Over 2750 tutoring hours

John R.

Cedar Park, TX

$48/hour

Experienced Math/Physics/Chem/Stat Tutor

In-person lessons
4.9 average from 953 ratings
Plain and simple, John is the man!!
— Colin, Cedar Park, TX on 9/26/14

Message John

Send John a message explaining your needs and you will receive a response shortly. Have you already emailed John or another tutor? If so, you have an account! Sign in now

 Checking availability…
Please enter the tutor's email address.
Please enter the student's email address.
Please describe how you heard about us.
Replies in 1 hour
Replies in 1 hour

Receive responses from additional tutors

If you select this option, WyzAnt will ask interested tutors to contact you by email if they are able to help. A maximum of five different tutors will email you and none of your personal information, including your email address, will be released.

University of Texas, Austin
Mathematics

Education

University of Texas, Austin (Mathematics)

About John

As a tutor my goal has always been, and always will be, to have a positive impact on the lives of the students with whom I work . No magic wand will put the power of learning solely in my hands, but I am confident those students that come to me prepared to work will find me a valuable resource and an enthusiastic ally. I take my work, and my students' work, seriously and I have experienced a lot of success helping students through difficult classes over the years, as my ratings and testimonials attest, and I rejoice in those successes.

I don't think the importance of a good education can be overemphasized. Not everything a student learns in school will be something they use on a daily basis, but I believe the more one knows the more opportunities for success one possesses. Academia is not the end-all to knowledge. Ethics and experience rank as highly, but some doors only academia can open. The positive impact I hope to have with students includes helping them realize their potential that they may enjoy the fullness of opportunities that come from investing one's energies into activities that enrich the mind.

I have been working in the Austin area as a tutor for over 20 years, and working with WyzAnt since 2008. I majored in math at UT-Austin, taking over 50 credit hours in math alone, as well as 50+ combined credit hours in physics, chemistry, astronomy, and statistics. I began tutoring at Austin Community College while still in school in 1992, and also worked in the math department at UT as a grader, as part of my work-study program. Even as a grader I was never content to just leave a paper with checks and exes on it. I always tried to determine, and highlight, where students' work got off track, as well as acknowledge exemplary work.

My general hours of availability are 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. M-Th and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat and Sun. I work strictly out of my home in Cedar Park, using a dedicated room as a one-student classroom. It has a whiteboard, large desk for students, and other teaching aids for myself, as well as online wi-fi access for students who may need it for their assignments. Students must bring their own laptop, tablet, or smart phone, however.

Philosophy-wise, I believe there is no learning without effort, and to that end I strive to get my students increasingly involved in the solution process as we work through similar types of problems. Students will get more out of our time together if they attempt problems independently before and after our sessions. However, we all need some guidance through the challenging world of academia at times, and I discourage students from working themselves to the point of frustration before seeking help. Do what you can, and let's get through the rest together. :-)

PLEASE NOTE: 24-HOUR CANCELLATION POLICY. I will enforce the following cancellation policy on all same day cancellations: 1/2 hour the first time, 3/4 hour the second time, and 1 hour thereafter. No exceptions. However, longer-term students, that have a proven record of reliability, are often given the opportunity to convert this charge into credit.

Looking forward to meeting you, and to being a part of your academic success!

Sincerely,
John R.
As a tutor my goal has always been, and always will be, to have a positive impact on the lives of the students with whom I work . No magic wand will put the power of learning solely in my hands, but I am confident those students that come to me prepared to work will find me a valuable resource and an enthusiastic ally. I take my work, and my Read more

Policies
Cancellation
24 hours notice required

Group rates available.

Travel Radius
Travels within 0 miles of Cedar Park, TX 78613
Background Check: Passed
In-person lessons

"Plain and simple, John is the man!!"

- Colin, Cedar Park, TX on 9/26/14

"Knowledgeable and explained things well..."

- Brad, Round Rock, TX on 4/26/16

"Excellent tutor!"

- Brooke, Austin, TX on 3/30/16

"The most knowledgeable and patient tutor."

- Ashley, Austin, TX on 3/26/16

"Most prepared tutor I have ever used"

- Brandon, Austin, TX on 12/18/15

"Knowledgeable and patient."

- Liza, Cedar Park, TX on 12/7/15

"Really Great Tutor"

- Billy, Round Rock, TX on 10/29/15

"Knows his stuff and was very patient with me."

- Jennifer, Austin, TX on 10/18/15

"Knowledgeable and explained in easy to understand language"

- Tony, Pflugerville, TX on 9/22/15

"Knowledgeable and flexible!"

- Donna, Cedar Park, TX on 6/18/15

"Willing to schedule at a moment's notice"

- Dave, Cedar Park, TX on 3/6/15

"Very helpful and willing to work with us"

- Michael, Cedar Park, TX on 3/6/15

"Daughter enjoys her sessions and tutor feedback is great for parents!"

- MARLA, Leander, TX on 2/12/15

"Very knowledgeable and patient!"

- Sandra, Leander, TX on 2/8/15

"Simply great"

- Robert, Austin, TX on 12/6/14

"Great First Impression"

- Sandi, Leander, TX on 11/17/14

"Excellent Tutor"

- Michelle, Leander, TX on 6/4/13

"A world of difference!!!!!"

- Lisa, Round Rock, TX on 5/27/13

"Best Physics Teacher Ever!"

- Dee Dee, Cedar Park, TX on 5/19/13

"Great tutor to my son!"

- Beatriz, Pflugerville, TX on 4/26/13

"Excellent, dedicated, result-oriented tutor."

- Simona, Austin, TX on 2/22/13

"Kind and Knowledgeable"

- Rona, Cedar Park, TX on 2/18/13

"Has made a huge impact!"

- Yvonne, Round Rock, TX on 12/19/12

"Great Tutor"

- Christine, Cedar Park, TX on 12/11/12

"Solid Teacher"

- Peter, Cedar Park, TX on 11/15/12

"Goes the extra mile!"

- Kathryn, Austin, TX on 5/19/12

"Great Tutor Who Understands How Young Minds Work!"

- Vanessa, Cedar Park, TX on 3/16/12

"Excellent Tutor. Knows his clients."

- Robbin, Leander, TX on 2/24/12

"Patient and Easy to Understand- Amazing!"

- Melissa, Cedar Park, TX on 10/12/11
Science:
Chemistry,
Physics

Approved subjects are in bold.

Approved subjects

In most cases, tutors gain approval in a subject by passing a proficiency exam. For some subject areas, like music and art, tutors submit written requests to demonstrate their proficiency to potential students. If a tutor is interested but not yet approved in a subject, the subject will appear in non-bold font. Tutors need to be approved in a subject prior to beginning lessons.

Algebra 1

Algebra is not a subject many students get excited about right off the bat. However, I find that students' interest in the subject grows as they find they can master topics they once found merely confusing, and strong algebra skills are imperative to success in higher level math classes, and in many science classes, so I always encourage students to do their best, even when it gets a bit tedious.

As an algebra tutor my goal is to help students create a mental framework for the various topics they encounter in the class, and to discern between those that are topic specific, such as to linear or quadratic functions, for example, and those that can be applied more generally, such as transformations, and properties of inverse functions. I strongly encourage students to adopt a best practices model for their work, and to not work in a minimalist fashion. And, lastly, I encourage students to keep a math journal reflecting the various aspects of topics discussed in the class. The only way to succeed in algebra is to have an ordered understanding of the many topics covered, and getting those topics down in an orderly written form, in their own words, is a great way of building that mental framework.

Algebra 2

Algebra is not a subject many students get excited about right off the bat. However, I find that students' interest in the subject grows as they find they can master topics they once found merely confusing, and strong algebra skills are imperative to success in higher level math classes, and in many science classes, so I always encourage students to do their best, even when it gets a bit tedious.

As an algebra tutor my goal is to help students create a mental framework for the various topics they encounter in the class, and to discern between those that are topic specific, such as to linear or quadratic functions, for example, and those that can be applied more generally, such as transformations, and properties of inverse functions. I strongly encourage students to adopt a best practices model for their work, and to not work in a minimalist fashion. And, lastly, I encourage students to keep a math journal reflecting the various aspects of topics discussed in the class. The only way to succeed in algebra is to have an ordered understanding of the many topics covered, and getting those topics down in an orderly written form, in their own words, is a great way of building that mental framework.

Calculus

Many of the difficulties students encounter in calculus stem from gaps in their understanding of topics covered in algebra and precalculus. My method for teaching calculus is to relate the new ideas discussed in calculus to topics covered in previous classes. In this manner, any gaps or forgotten knowledge will necessarily be reviewed in the process, too.

For students in college or high school AP classes the pace of the course can also be a challenge, but as part of helping students through particular problems, my goal is also to help them relate ideas from multiple sections together, and to help them develop a conceptual understanding of the underlying principles at work, including graphical implications of many of the formulas used in calculus, as well as how these principles do, and do not, generalize. Using formulas is a necessary part of calculus, but in order to apply calculus to physics, for example, one must have a solid understanding of the underlying principles as well. Having studied advanced calculus, and several upper division physics classes, I can help students develop a deeper understanding of the material, as well as apply the various formulas correctly.

Chemistry

College and AP chemistry classes will contain more complicated, multi-step problems, often related to energy considerations, but a deeper understanding of the underlying general principles governing a process can help make sense of the ordering of the required steps needed to solve a complicated problem, and as I work through specific exercises with students, I will also emphasize these principles and how they apply.

Differential Equations

Differential Equations is truly one of my favorite subjects to tutor. Although I enjoy tutoring a wide range of math classes, I was never really excited about math until I enrolled in this class. While at UT-Austin, I made A's in Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, Real Analysis, and Vector and Tensor Analysis. I also made A's in the physics classes that required the techniques taught within them: Wave Motion and Optics, Classical Dynamics, Classical Electrodynamics, and Kinematic Astronomy. One caveat: many DE classes now include MatLab exercises. I am not familiar with MatLab.

Discrete Math

As an introduction to counting methods (combinatorics) and proofs, Discrete Math is one of the first proofs courses I took at UT-Austin. I made an A in the class as well as in many other related upper division math classes, including Linear Algebra, Probability, Real Analysis and Topology. Although I have seen variability in the difficulty of this class, based on the aims of the different teachers teaching them, I have yet to need to turn anyone away and feel very comfortable with the material.

Geometry

Geometry is one of the classes where I have seen some dramatic turnarounds in student performance. My experience has been that, due to the less formulaic nature of the class, that students get used to in arithmetic and algebra, students are not always sure what is expected of them in geometry. As a tutor, my goal is to help students understand what is expected of them in, for example, presenting a proof, as well as to help them fill in any gaps in the required algebra they may have forgotten, or simply not gotten to yet. I will instruct students to focus on the various postulates, theorems, and definitions required for success in geometry. Proofs are largely a matter of brainstorming first, and then stringing together a series of steps connecting the given information to the desired result, and justifying each of those steps with a postulate, theorem, or definition.

Linear Algebra

Linear algebra is both a computational and a proofs course. However, different instructors will often focus on different aspects of the course, so there is a fair amount of variability among individual courses. As a math major, I have studied a wide range of mathematics and am well-suited for tutoring linear algebra, but proofs cannot always be quickly generated on the fly. When possible, I ask students to let me spend a day or so on the material before our session, in order that the session itself may go more smoothly. For much of the simpler material, such as matrix or vector operations, being able to brainstorm on the material beforehand may not be of much importance, but it doesn't hurt.

Logic

As a math major, I made A's in several proof courses, including intro to real analysis, and real analysis.

Physics

Physics is going to be a challenge for nearly every student the first time through. Ideally, I like to meet with students early in their studies and help them understand what I consider the most important topic for them to master first, vectors. This understanding is crucial to success in the class, but some students may not have the prerequisite math (precalculus), and/or the importance of vectors may be underemphasized by their teachers.

Beyond that I like to present strict algorithmic methods students can consistently apply when solving general classes of problems, as for kinematics, Newton's Laws, conservation of momentum, work and energy, and rotational dynamics, etc. Having studied calculus-based general physics, upper-division Newtonian physics, classical electrodynamics, and waves and optics, as well as having tutored high school and college physics for several years, I can help students keep the big picture in mind as they determine which equations, and how to use them, to solve easy or complicated physics problems.

Prealgebra

Strictly speaking, pre-algebra refers to the arithmetic required for success in algebra, such as how to work with positive and negative numbers, how to apply the arithmetic operations (+, -, *, and /) to fractions, how to work with exponents, and the correct "order of operations" to apply to expressions containing multiple arithmetic symbols. However, there are also often underemphasized aspects of pre-algebra that students will do well to focus on, too: those of mathematical definitions and properties of numbers and number systems, that are used extensively in algebra, such as the commutative and associative properties of addition and multiplication, the distributive property, the sets of: natural, whole, integer, rational, irrational, and real numbers, and many others.

As a tutor, I don't want to see students get overly bogged down in this abstract aspect of the class. I want students to be able to use them in a second-nature sort of way. But transitioning from arithmetic to algebra is abstract in nature, and it is imperative, if students are to understand what they are reading in an algebra textbook, or the instructions on a test or homework, that they have a proper understanding of the vocabulary used, and the general properties of numbers drawn upon, within a text, or by a teacher. Furthermore, it is exactly these types of definitions and properties that are most important in a class like geometry, where a student has to justify each step of their work with a definition, postulate, or theorem. As a pre-algebra tutor, I help students work through specific problems, but also remind them of the properties of numbers used to justify the steps involved, in the hopes they will be able to apply these definitions and properties in ever more sophisticated ways in their ongoing study of mathematics.

Precalculus

Precalculus is a class where most students will start to have some issues, even if they have been doing very well in earlier math classes. I suspect this difficulty arises for two main reasons: one is the novelty of new functions encountered, such as the trigonometric functions, and two, because this class draws heavily upon properties of functions studied in algebra, which may have been forgotten or underappreciated. As a pre-calculus tutor, my goal is to remind students of these properties, where applicable, and to help ease the transition into trigonometry by breaking down the various aspects of the trigonometric functions into those that must simply be memorized, and those that are interrelated. I will also help them minimize the amount of rote memorization required by exploiting the interconnections between many of the topics covered.

Statistics

I think the key to first-year statistics is keeping the big picture in mind, both figuratively and literally. All of the sections over normal distributions, t-distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing are so closely related. If one understands what the Central Limit Theorem implies, and how to exploit it, one can quickly work through several sections in the text with no problem. My goal as a tutor is to help students grasp the big picture, understand the Central Limit Theorem, and see how various sections in the text are interrelated.

Graphs are also a great tool to visualizing the probabilities studied in statistics, and many teachers require students to include graphs in their work. I also prefer to get a good picture before trying to use formulas to find probabilities. My experience has been that until a student can consistently generate the correct pictures, they will struggle with the formulas, but once they understand how to correlate desired probabilities with their corresponding graphs, they can easily adjust the formulas as they move through related sections in the material, and consistently generate correct answers.

Trigonometry

Trigonometry is a class where most students will start to have some issues, even if they have been doing very well in earlier math classes. I suspect this is for two main reasons: one is the novelty of new functions encountered and, two, because this class draws heavily upon properties of functions studied in algebra, but which may have been forgotten or underappreciated. As a trigonometry tutor, my goal is to remind students of these properties, where applicable, and to help ease the transition into trigonometry by breaking down the various aspects of the trigonometric functions into those that must simply be memorized, and those that are interrelated. I will also help them minimize the amount of rote memorization required by exploiting the interconnections between many of the topics covered.

University of Texas, Austin
Mathematics

Education

University of Texas, Austin (Mathematics)

Plain and simple, John is the man!! — Been working with John for the last couple months, and he is by far the best tutor I've had. Trust me when I say this, I've had a lot of them. His patience with going over the same material in different ways to apply my material has helped me tremendously. I give him a 5 star review. Thanks John. ...

— Colin, Cedar Park, TX on 9/26/14

Hourly rate

Standard Hourly Rate: $48.00

Cancellation: 24 hours notice required

Group rates available.

Travel policy

John will travel within 0 miles of Cedar Park, TX 78613.