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Lee L D.

Cleveland, OH

$43/hour

Experienced, Knowledgeable, 85-90% Sustainable Reading Success Rate

In-person lessons
10+ Hours
Background check passed as of 2/28/13
4.0 average from 4 ratings
A great tutor who is patient and determined to help students succeed.
— Jackie, Cleveland, OH on 9/19/14

$43/Hour


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Capital University
Psychology
Research Studies University of Michigan
Master's
Antioch University, Ohio
PhD

Education

Capital University (Psychology)

Research Studies University of Michigan (Master's)

Antioch University, Ohio (PhD)

About Lee L

I began working with children and teaching academic/behavior modification techniques in the mid 1990's. For the past 7 years I have worked specifically as a Cognitive & Educational Specialist, providing one-on-one brain-based tutoring to help students increase their learning potential. My brain-based "Comprenetic" tutoring is an approach that ensures a student develops the learning skills needed to permanently REMEMBER academic knowledge (preventing the need for additional tutoring in later years).

Areas in which I specialize are dyslexia and other reading difficulties, ADHD/Focus, processing speed and other unspecified learning disabilities.

Student growth is meticulously measured and recorded. Past student data demonstrates that the Comprenetic approach shows significant growth as early as 12 hours into the program. In addition, school reports show students continue to retain their new skills, and achieve high B's and A's.

Along with Comprenetic Tutoring, the following scientifically proven approaches are supplemented, Interactive Metronome (IM)and Integrated Listening System (iLs)

Utilizing these cognitive, multisensory approaches have been proven to change the processing abilities of the brain and sustain learning abilities. These approaches have been scientifically proven to increase focus/concentration, reading/reading comprehension, working memory, math skills and the focused rate at which students complete homework assignments.

I have extensively studied the processes of the brain and how to maximize learning. I completed my doctorate studies in Educational Psychology specializing in Learning Disabilities of Childhood. In 2008, I began a 3-year study to measure the effects and success of the programs I offer, using the data collected, a curriculum specific to dyslexia and nonspecific learning disabilities was developed and is pending publication.

Students in the study (and those who have received tutoring services) demonstrated an average of 87.89% overall increase in learning abilities. Follow up with students (3 and 5 years post initial programming) continues to demonstrate sustained academic abilities (average GPA with these students ranges from 3.2 - 3.8).

I continue to study ways to help develop brain based abilities, and look forward to helping your child develop strong academic skills.
I began working with children and teaching academic/behavior modification techniques in the mid 1990's. For the past 7 years I have worked specifically as a Cognitive & Educational Specialist, providing one-on-one brain-based tutoring to help students increase their learning potential. My brain-based "Comprenetic" tutoring is an approach that Read more

Policies
Travel Radius
Travels within 20 miles of Cleveland, OH 44121
Background Check: Passed
In-person lessons

"A great tutor who is patient and determined to help students succeed."

- Jackie, Cleveland, OH on 9/19/14

"A must if your child deals with attention issues!"

- Dale, Cleveland, OH on 10/20/12

"Great tutor"

- Tanya, Cleveland, OH on 5/25/12
Math:
Elementary (K-6th),
Elementary Math
English:
English, Reading,
Vocabulary, Writing
Language:
Reading,
Writing
History:
Writing
Special Needs:
ADHD,
Dyslexia,
Elementary (K-6th),
Elementary Math, Phonics,
Reading,
Special Needs,
Study Skills
Elementary Education:
ADHD,
Elementary (K-6th),
Elementary Math, Phonics,
Reading,
Spelling, Study Skills,
Vocabulary, Writing
Business:
Writing

Approved subjects are in bold.

Approved subjects

In most cases, tutors gain approval in a subject by passing a proficiency exam. For some subject areas, like music and art, tutors submit written requests to demonstrate their proficiency to potential students. If a tutor is interested but not yet approved in a subject, the subject will appear in non-bold font. Tutors need to be approved in a subject prior to beginning lessons.

ADHD

One of the most neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). ADHD is characterized by distractibility, impulsivity/hyperactivity. ADHD is an inability to sustain attention, divide attention and interrupts an individual’s working memory, as well as hinders the organizational thought process needed to complete tasks without prodding.

Neurologically, individuals who struggle with ADHD have more challenges with motor planning and timing/rhythm within the cerebellum. The cerebellum (the little brain/quiet achiever) is the area responsible for motor planning, rhythm/timing, learning new skills and automaticity (speed of processing information). The cerebellum connects to the Reticular Activating System (RAS). RAS is the arousal area of the brain and regulates consciousness. Being aware creates a baseline “state of readiness” for learning and connects to the executive functioning area in the brain's Pre-frontal cortex (PFC). Student with ADHD have deficiencies in the PFC/Executive Functioning area of the brain as well as deficiencies in the cerebellum. Deficiencies in these areas impact cognitive abilities. Cognition is concentration of thought, reasoning and the ability to comprehend or understand, and mentally process information. Being aware cognitively influences a child’s ability to sustain attention, process sensory information, organize this information effectively, and carry out a series of instructions (such as getting reading for school, packing up necessary materials for homework and efficiently completing assignments).

To help the ADHD student develop and/or strengthen his/her brain’s timing/rhythm, motor planning, so cognition is stronger, concentration increased, and academic abilities achieved, I utilize a combination of three complementary interventions. Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improving motor skill planning, comprehension, organizational processing and self-driven behaviors. ) Interactive metronome (an approach to develop the timing/rhythm of the brain), and Audiblox (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and establish an ability to sustained/divided attention). Students with whom I have worked have shown marked improvement in focus, self-confidence, motivation and have increased report card grades from low c/d’s to b’s and a’s.

From September of 2008, through August of 2011, I conducted a study to measure the effects of the programs I offer on ADHD. 93% of the 73 students tested demonstrated improved working memory. 89% of the 73 students tested demonstrated an increase in concentration. 98% of the students demonstrated a 1.5 to 2.7 increase in GPA. The first groups of students (2008/2009 school year) continue to demonstrate academic growth solidifying the sustainability of the program.

I have also been interviewed several times on WKYC Channel 3 TV in Cleveland, Ohio about ADHD and other learning difficulties.

Dyslexia

The majority of my clients struggle with Dyslexia or other reading and spelling problems. After intervention, 90% of the students increase their ability to read by 2 and 3 grade levels usually within a 3 or 4 month time frame. Below demonstrates me knowledge, techniques and success rate with Dyslexia and other reading and spelling problems.

Dyslexia is a spectrum disorder, ranging from simply seeing letters backwards or inside-out, to encompassing difficulty reading, spelling and writing, and extending to a markedly severe inability to connect sound to symbol and/or recognize and understand written language.

There is evidence of visual perceptual and motor planning differences in people with dyslexia. Much research activity is currently dedicated to treating the visual or motor system, as some researchers have formulated theories that account for the coexistence of both visual and motor problems (in addition to the more widely accepted cognitive problems in the domain of phonological coding, rapid naming and sensory [visual/verbal] working memory).

To help students who struggle with dyslexia and/or other reading difficulties, I begin students on the Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improving motor skill planning, comprehension, organizational processing and self-driven behaviors). The iLs is set at a low frequency to target sensory motor, with activities that involve movement. At the same time, I implement the Brain Balance Academics™ program (a research-based curriculum that two other intervention specialists and I designed (pending publication). The BBA™ targets the sensory memory through pictures and motor movement to solidify symbol/sound awareness. (Example: /e/ has horns and teeth, he is referred to as “E”vil Ed with an evil laugh “eh eh eh. Students will make an evil face, form evil claw hands and laugh the evil laugh! Likewise, his brother, Bossy “E” quietly sneaks up to other vowels and demand “Say YOUR name.” Through the BBA™, curriculum, students with dyslexia/reading problems had developed a stronger sensory memory ability when decoding v/c/v. Sight words are targeted the same way. (Example: tomorrow is broken down with picture of “Tom” thinking if he will ride his bike “Or” “Row”.)

To increase fluency, students will practice decoding and reading sight words with the Interactive Metronome (an approach to develop the timing/rhythm of the brain). The IM is measured in milliseconds and provides cues to the student indicating that are approaching the task too impulsively or processing the information too slowly. Audiblox (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and recognize letter patterns) is also used. Students I have treated have increased sight word levels by 3 and 4 years and reading fluency/comprehension by 2 to 3 years. (This program was also part of a study to measure the effects of the programs. The 44 students in the study showed a combined 78% increase in the pre-post achievement tests.

I have also been interviewed several times on WKYC Channel 3 TV in Cleveland, Ohio about ADHD and other learning difficulties.

Elementary (K-6th)

Learning is not always about how much you know, but how efficiently your brain manages the information it is given.

The majority of student with whom I have worked are between Kindergarten and 6th grade. The learning challenges may range in type (ex: math, reading, comprehension, or writing) however, all struggle with the speed or rate at which they are processing instruction or how well they can retain what they learn.

When working with K-6 students who have difficulty in school, I use a specific approach to strengthen their academic skills. It is common practice for me to begin students on the Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improving motor skill planning, comprehension, organizational processing and self-driven behaviors). The iLs is set at a low frequency to target sensory motor, with activities that involve sensory movement and focus. Audiblox, (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and establish an ability to sustained/divided attention and retain new information.) The SAW METHOD -- Brain Balance Academics™ program (a research-based curriculum that two other intervention specialists and I designed (pending publication). The SAW METHOD™ targets the sensory memory through pictures and motor movement to solidify symbol/sound awareness or concept association. (Example: a visual concept to spend time with your friend tomorrow or to go row a boat ( “Tom” or “row”) This approach is also effective when memorizing social study timelines or science facts.

I conducted a study with students between the ages of 5 and 10, specific to processing speed and learning. 75 students ranging in age 5 to 10 with non-specific learning disabilities participated in the study. Of these 75 K-6th grade students, 96% demonstrated increase scores on tests and report cards.

I have also been interviewed several times on WKYC Channel 3 TV in Cleveland, Ohio about learning difficulties.

Phonics

For 5 years I have spent significant time researching and studying how the brain processes sound and correlates sound to letters. As a result, I have developed strategies to apply brain balanced approaches to teaching phonics and reading fluency. These approaches have helped students go from below grade level to grade level and above in a few as three months time. See below my knowledge, techniques and success rate with students who have had difficulty developing the ability to sound out words.

Phonics is a method of teaching phonemic awareness in order for a student to be able to blend sounds/symbols to other sound/symbols to form words. Having an automatic ability to sound out words increases reading fluency.

Teaching phonics is a stratified process. Certain things have to be taught first, beginning with automatizing the underlying skills. The act of learning begins with reception of information through attention, concentration, and perception, perception being sensory motor (visual, auditory and haptic [discriminate, synthesize, analyze]). With reception the building blocks can more readily become automatized.

The building blocks for automaticity is strong phonological awareness and phonemic awareness (the ability decode and encode). Decoding and encoding is very important to the aspect of reading. Without being able to decode a word (visual), the reader will not understand the letters on the page. Likewise, without being able to encode (auditory) the listener will not be able to understand the language (sound/symbol association)

Working with dyslexic student has help me to work with decoding and encoding. It is common practice for me to begin students on the Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improving motor skill planning, comprehension, organizational processing and self-driven behaviors). The iLs is set at a low frequency to target sensory motor, with activities that involve sensory movement and focus. Audiblox, (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and establish an ability to sustained/divided attention and recognize letter patterns). The Brain Balance Academics™ program (a research-based curriculum that two other intervention specialists and I designed (pending publication). The BBA™ targets the sensory memory through pictures and motor movement to solidify symbol/sound awareness. (Example: /a/ as in apple. As you get ready to take a big bit out of you’re a big aaaant is on it … and you scream is surprise “aaaaaan aaaaaaant is on my aaaaaaapple!) Through the BBA™, curriculum, students with decoding/reading problems have developed stronger sensory memory abilities needed to decode and encode.

Students who participated in the Decoding (sounding out) study were given the above approaches for developing phonemic awareness. The phonics aspect to BBA™ had a combined increase of 98% increase in sound/symbol awareness. (62 students ranging in age 5 to 17 with auditory/visual processing and decoding/encoding difficulties participated in the study.)

I have also been interviewed several times on WKYC Channel 3 TV in Cleveland, Ohio about decoding and other learning difficulties.

Reading

Teaching reading and math is a stratified process. Certain things have to be taught first, beginning with automatizing the underlying skills. The act of learning begins with reception (efficiently receiving information) through attention, concentration, and perception. Perception is a sensory motor (visual, auditory and haptic (haptic is to discriminate, synthesize, analyze)). With effective reception, the building blocks of learning become automatic.

When working with students who have difficulty with reading and math, I use a specific approach to strengthen visual and auditory memory. It is common practice for me to begin students on the Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improving motor skill planning, comprehension, organizational processing and self-driven behaviors). The iLs is set at a low frequency to target sensory motor, with activities that involve sensory movement and focus. Audiblox, (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and establish an ability to sustained/divided attention and recognize letter patterns). The SAW METHOD -- Brain Balance Academics™ program (a research-based curriculum that two other intervention specialists and I designed (pending publication). The SAW METHOD™ targets the sensory memory through pictures and motor movement to solidify symbol/sound awareness. (Example: /a/ as in apple. As you get ready to take a big bit out of you’re a big aaaant is on it ... and you scream is surprise “aaaaaan aaaaaaant is on my aaaaaaapple!)

Through the SAW METHOD™, students with decoding/reading problems have developed stronger sensory memory abilities needed to decode and encode. Likewise, these same students struggling with math use a number pattern approach that is also enhanced through sensory and working memory.

Special Needs

The majority of special needs students I work with struggle with Cognitive Delays and Auditory Processing. I have found that these disabilities are connected to an imbalance in brain’s timing/rhythm, motor planning connected to muscle movement, and spatial awareness. These disabilities also impact the ability to understand or comprehend instruction and behavior management. To help these students develop listening and learning skills, I utilize a combination of several complementary interventions. The Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improves motor skill planning and comprehension. The Interactive Metronome (an approach to develop the timing/rhythm of the brain), and Audiblox (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and establish an ability to sustained/divided attention and comprehend instruction).

Students with cognitive delays and auditory processing with whom I have worked have shown marked improvement in focus and comprehension. In addition, they now demonstrate an increased ability to manage behavior and articulate what they have learned.

From May of 2011 through March 2012, I began a study to measure the effects of the programs I offer for cognitive delays and auditory processing. So far, 66% of the students tested demonstrated improved working memory, an increase in coordination and spatial awareness. One student, completely unable to process conversation, went on to obtain a retail job where she became the role-mode for how new employees should handle customers.

Study Skills

Weak study skills can be the result of many things, an inability to remember information learned is one of the most challenging blocks when it comes to developing study skills.

The techniques I use when working with students who have weak study skills, help them develop efficient strategies to organize information, retain that information and decrease the amount of time devoted to homework.

When the memory is working efficiently, students find studying easier and thus, become more motivated to study.

It is common practice for me to begin students on the Integrated Listening System (iLs) (a research-based program that stimulates cerebellar activity, strengthening the neural connections and improving motor skill planning, comprehension, organizational processing and self-driven behaviors). The iLs is set at a low frequency to target sensory motor, with activities that involve sensory movement and focus. Audiblox, (a series of cognitive and academic skill activities that develop the ability to plan and sequence, increase sensory and working memory, and establish an ability to sustained/divided attention and retain new information.)

75 students who struggled with memory and weak study skills participated in a 2 year research project to determine the effects of the programs I implement. Of these 75 students, 96% demonstrated increased scores on tests and report cards.

Capital University
Psychology
Research Studies University of Michigan
Master's
Antioch University, Ohio
PhD

Education

Capital University (Psychology)

Research Studies University of Michigan (Master's)

Antioch University, Ohio (PhD)

A great tutor who is patient and determined to help students succeed.

My son struggles with ADHD. Dr. Lee has worked tirelessly with him to improve his focus and processing speed. She's helping him develop the tools he needs now, and will need in the future, to reach the potential we know he has to succeed. My son's teachers have seen much improvement in his self-confidence and desire to participate. Since working with Dr. Lee, my son is keeping pace with his classm

— Jackie, Cleveland, OH on 9/19/14

Hourly rate

Standard Hourly Rate: $43.00

Travel policy

Lee L will travel within 20 miles of Cleveland, OH 44121.