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Oscar H.

Empathy-driven, detail-oriented tutoring in Math, Spanish, & Test Prep

Empathy-driven, detail-oriented tutoring in Math, Spanish, & Test Prep

$40/hour

About Oscar


Bio

I have attended relatively small schools my entire life, at which I have had the pleasure of meeting all sorts of wonderful and talented teachers who have inspired me to teach, as well. As a recent graduate from Benjamin Franklin High School, and a current student at the University of New Orleans, I sincerely value and enjoy high-quality, one-on-one, learning and teaching.

There are a couple small but important (to me) points I'd like to address before getting into my qualifications. 1) I...

I have attended relatively small schools my entire life, at which I have had the pleasure of meeting all sorts of wonderful and talented teachers who have inspired me to teach, as well. As a recent graduate from Benjamin Franklin High School, and a current student at the University of New Orleans, I sincerely value and enjoy high-quality, one-on-one, learning and teaching.

There are a couple small but important (to me) points I'd like to address before getting into my qualifications. 1) I try my best to encourage and guide students to a point where they no longer get stressed out by new material, or put up walls when they see something they don't like. And 2) I try to reinforce the idea that every problem can be solved. I will never tell a student, "Oh, I don't know. Let's move on." Particularly with math, it's just as (if not more) important to me to teach students ways to approach problems, as well as just how to solve those problems.

I spent my latter years at Franklin working with the Peer Assistance Team (PAT) as a tutor for Algebra and Physics. I now work with the Student Support Services (SSS) at UNO as a math tutor for everything from Algebra to Calculus. In addition, I just enjoy math so much. I get a visceral joy from completing problems, no matter how easy or difficult, and as such, I keep textbooks just so I can reference them for my other classes and my own life.

While I have no formal experience teaching Spanish or Latin, outside of providing pointers in and around class to fellow students, I am a native Spanish speaker who took four years of the language anyway, just to reinforce everything for myself, and I have spent many years learning Latin for my own use and pleasure. Just like with math, I keep Spanish and Latin textbooks on my home bookshelf, which I regularly reference when I've inevitably forgotten something small.

All in all, I have over five years of experience formally and informally assisting my peers with a subject they were having trouble in, and more importantly, with helping them learn to approach problem-solving and get past their fears and stumbling blocks.

New Orleans is a small enough city that I have no problem being flexible with my time and location. I am happy to meet with a student or students at their home or college, but personally, I will most often prefer meeting in a public place that I can get to easily, at least while I'm getting my bearings straight with freelance tutoring.

Finally, as I will likely be using public transportation to meet with students, I have a 12- to 24-hour cancellation policy, just to ensure that no one's efforts go to waste.

If you are interested, I am absolutely excited to meet you and help you in whatever academic way I can!


Education

University of New Orleans
Mathematics

Policies

  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person
  • Hourly Rate: $40
  • Travel policy: Within 8 miles of Metairie, LA 70005
  • Lesson cancellation: 12 hours notice required
  • No background check

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

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Subjects

Corporate Training

Latin,

Latin

In high school, I took three years of Latin, which started with basic grammar and went up to translating / interpreting Vergil's "The Aeneid." As a Summa cum Laude (Gold medal) scoring student on National Latin Exam, I adored every second of it, as I adore any language (dead or otherwise), and I am always honored to pass on knowledge about such a beautiful thing. During my second and third years of the class, I acted essentially as a TA (Teacher's Assistant), working through translations with groups of students inside or out of class. My teacher, the venerable Dr. Stephen Pearce (or "Prof"), who has been teaching Latin for literal decades, even took time to teach me ways to teach, which has helped me for every subject, including Latin.
Spanish

Spanish

As a native Spanish speaker, my Guatemalan family having raised me on the language, it comes easy to understand. As a Spanish student for over four years, my teachers having reinforced and explained away every ambiguity in the language, it now comes easy to teach, as well. In the few instances where I've taught Spanish to friends from the ground up, I've done it the way I think every language should be taught -- pronunciation->types of words->types of sentences. Spanish, like any Math, is best taught as a slow, cumulative climb. That's how I approach / make sense of it.

English

ACT English,

ACT English

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. English, while not a subject I've professionally tutored yet, was and is always one of my stronger subjects in school, especially when it comes to grammar. With 45 minutes to complete 75 questions, the English section of the ACT is a sprint, and I feel versed enough in the subject to not only teach the material, but also methods for finishing in a timely manner.
ACT Reading

ACT Reading

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. The reading portion of the ACT is one of the two shortest sections of the test, so, just like with the rest of the test, it's a sprint. It doesn't test you on if you can read -- that's assumed; it tests you on if you can read/skim quickly and accurately enough to answer various questions about purpose, tone, etc.. I can teach you how to read the test so you can maximize the amount of time you spend answering questions versus just scrolling through the passages.

Homeschool

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from basic slope to systems of inequalities to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from factoring to conic sections to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Calculus,

Calculus

In middle school, Calculus was the holy grail of mathematics I could not wait to attain. Ten years later, I've taken multiple Calculus classes of increasing levels of difficulty, mostly for fun, and I've even had the luxury of learning it from amazing teachers from whom I've inherited many great teaching techniques (which I've been using while tutoring Calculus in college!).
Spanish

Spanish

As a native Spanish speaker, my Guatemalan family having raised me on the language, it comes easy to understand. As a Spanish student for over four years, my teachers having reinforced and explained away every ambiguity in the language, it now comes easy to teach, as well. In the few instances where I've taught Spanish to friends from the ground up, I've done it the way I think every language should be taught -- pronunciation->types of words->types of sentences. Spanish, like any Math, is best taught as a slow, cumulative climb. That's how I approach / make sense of it.

Language

Latin,

Latin

In high school, I took three years of Latin, which started with basic grammar and went up to translating / interpreting Vergil's "The Aeneid." As a Summa cum Laude (Gold medal) scoring student on National Latin Exam, I adored every second of it, as I adore any language (dead or otherwise), and I am always honored to pass on knowledge about such a beautiful thing. During my second and third years of the class, I acted essentially as a TA (Teacher's Assistant), working through translations with groups of students inside or out of class. My teacher, the venerable Dr. Stephen Pearce (or "Prof"), who has been teaching Latin for literal decades, even took time to teach me ways to teach, which has helped me for every subject, including Latin.
Spanish

Spanish

As a native Spanish speaker, my Guatemalan family having raised me on the language, it comes easy to understand. As a Spanish student for over four years, my teachers having reinforced and explained away every ambiguity in the language, it now comes easy to teach, as well. In the few instances where I've taught Spanish to friends from the ground up, I've done it the way I think every language should be taught -- pronunciation->types of words->types of sentences. Spanish, like any Math, is best taught as a slow, cumulative climb. That's how I approach / make sense of it.

Math

ACT Math,

ACT Math

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. Math is already my strongest subject. The Math portion of the ACT involves fairly simple concepts and (more importantly) knowing how to execute those concepts quickly, which is where I come in -- even if you know how to do all the math on the test, it's more important that you know how to do it swiftly.
Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from basic slope to systems of inequalities to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from factoring to conic sections to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Calculus

Calculus

In middle school, Calculus was the holy grail of mathematics I could not wait to attain. Ten years later, I've taken multiple Calculus classes of increasing levels of difficulty, mostly for fun, and I've even had the luxury of learning it from amazing teachers from whom I've inherited many great teaching techniques (which I've been using while tutoring Calculus in college!).

Most Popular

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from basic slope to systems of inequalities to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from factoring to conic sections to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Calculus,

Calculus

In middle school, Calculus was the holy grail of mathematics I could not wait to attain. Ten years later, I've taken multiple Calculus classes of increasing levels of difficulty, mostly for fun, and I've even had the luxury of learning it from amazing teachers from whom I've inherited many great teaching techniques (which I've been using while tutoring Calculus in college!).
Spanish

Spanish

As a native Spanish speaker, my Guatemalan family having raised me on the language, it comes easy to understand. As a Spanish student for over four years, my teachers having reinforced and explained away every ambiguity in the language, it now comes easy to teach, as well. In the few instances where I've taught Spanish to friends from the ground up, I've done it the way I think every language should be taught -- pronunciation->types of words->types of sentences. Spanish, like any Math, is best taught as a slow, cumulative climb. That's how I approach / make sense of it.

Science

ACT Science

ACT Science

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. Science, coming in at 35 minutes to answer 40 questions, is one of the two shortest sections of the ACT. In fact, it often feels a lot like the Reading section, but with more numbers / science words. The part of this section I emphasize is that it's fundamentally a test on your ability to parse data for conclusions -- scientific-method style -- not a test on balancing chemical equations and such. I can break down ways to approach this with you.

Summer

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from basic slope to systems of inequalities to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have been taking, tutoring, or otherwise using Algebra 1 and 2 for about six years now. It was one of my main subjects when tutoring in high school, and is currently my main subject tutoring in college. I have taught everything from factoring to conic sections to everyone from 12 year olds to 60 year olds. Math is fundamentally cumulative, and I, as the tutor, emphasize going down a rung whenever needed to explain a smaller concept before returning to the bigger concept.
Calculus,

Calculus

In middle school, Calculus was the holy grail of mathematics I could not wait to attain. Ten years later, I've taken multiple Calculus classes of increasing levels of difficulty, mostly for fun, and I've even had the luxury of learning it from amazing teachers from whom I've inherited many great teaching techniques (which I've been using while tutoring Calculus in college!).
Spanish

Spanish

As a native Spanish speaker, my Guatemalan family having raised me on the language, it comes easy to understand. As a Spanish student for over four years, my teachers having reinforced and explained away every ambiguity in the language, it now comes easy to teach, as well. In the few instances where I've taught Spanish to friends from the ground up, I've done it the way I think every language should be taught -- pronunciation->types of words->types of sentences. Spanish, like any Math, is best taught as a slow, cumulative climb. That's how I approach / make sense of it.

Test Preparation

ACT English,

ACT English

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. English, while not a subject I've professionally tutored yet, was and is always one of my stronger subjects in school, especially when it comes to grammar. With 45 minutes to complete 75 questions, the English section of the ACT is a sprint, and I feel versed enough in the subject to not only teach the material, but also methods for finishing in a timely manner.
ACT Math,

ACT Math

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. Math is already my strongest subject. The Math portion of the ACT involves fairly simple concepts and (more importantly) knowing how to execute those concepts quickly, which is where I come in -- even if you know how to do all the math on the test, it's more important that you know how to do it swiftly.
ACT Reading,

ACT Reading

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. The reading portion of the ACT is one of the two shortest sections of the test, so, just like with the rest of the test, it's a sprint. It doesn't test you on if you can read -- that's assumed; it tests you on if you can read/skim quickly and accurately enough to answer various questions about purpose, tone, etc.. I can teach you how to read the test so you can maximize the amount of time you spend answering questions versus just scrolling through the passages.
ACT Science

ACT Science

As a fairly recent graduate from Ben Franklin, a high school which (at least when I was there) required us to take the ACT in-school in our junior year, all of my teachers readily prepared us for the test. In the end, I got a 30, and then I got a 31 when I took it a second time outside of school a year later. Science, coming in at 35 minutes to answer 40 questions, is one of the two shortest sections of the ACT. In fact, it often feels a lot like the Reading section, but with more numbers / science words. The part of this section I emphasize is that it's fundamentally a test on your ability to parse data for conclusions -- scientific-method style -- not a test on balancing chemical equations and such. I can break down ways to approach this with you.

Ratings and Reviews


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$40/hour

Oscar H.

$40/hour

  • No subscriptions or upfront payments

  • Only pay for the time you need

  • Find the right fit, or your first hour is free

Contact Oscar

Response time: 1 minute