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Grace F.

A mathematician and a physicist

A mathematician and a physicist

$60/hour

About Grace


Bio

My interest in teaching comes from my own love of learning. I believe that a large part of my job as a teacher and mentor is to transmit this love of learning and to bring out the best in my students, challenging them to exceed their own expectations in the classroom. I want to teach mathematics and science because of the important role that mathematics and statistics play in our understanding of science and because math is the language in which virtually all media presents information. It...

My interest in teaching comes from my own love of learning. I believe that a large part of my job as a teacher and mentor is to transmit this love of learning and to bring out the best in my students, challenging them to exceed their own expectations in the classroom. I want to teach mathematics and science because of the important role that mathematics and statistics play in our understanding of science and because math is the language in which virtually all media presents information. It also stems from a belief that environmental issues are intricately connected with technology and a sense of responsibility to educate a citizenry that is "literate" in environment sciences.

In considering how one goes about sharing one's love of learning, it is important to consider that learning strategies differ widely and that teaching strategies are not always easily matched with students' needs. In addition, students bring widely varying knowledge bases to the table in each course, so each course is different according to the background and learning preferences of that particular class. A further complication is that students also bring different levels of maturity, interest and motivation.

My goals in teaching are not just to promote learning of the subject matter. I also try to help the students learn to think logically, learn problem-solving methods and techniques, and improve writing skills (writing clearly and concisely, explaining systematic processes, providing valid reasons for logical arguments). In addition, I try to help students see the course material in a holistic context by requiring them to synthesize the various concepts of the course by applying them together.


Education

Old Dominion University
Physics and Applied
Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis
Masters
Indiana Weslayan University
Other

Policies

  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person
  • Hourly Rate: $60
  • Rate details: Rates are negotiable
  • Travel policy: Within 10 miles of Indianapolis, IN 46254
  • Lesson cancellation: 24 hours notice required
  • No background check

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

Schedule

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Subjects

Art

Needlework

Needlework

Needlework, as defined by "any form of decorative stitching done by hand" seems to be too broad, but there really is not a better way to define it. I have been learning all through my life about the different techniques and find that there is always something new to learn. Included will be all variations of stitchery: stamped embroidery, counted thread stitching, and canvas work, including needlepoint. Discussion might cover different kinds of canvases and fabric grounds, flosses, needles and other supplies, pattern design, marking, and finishing etc.

Corporate Training

Italian

Italian

The aim is to present the basis of spoken and written Italian. During the course the students will learn how to communicate in simple everyday situations and will also get in touch with some relevant Italian cultural features. The course is focused on communication: a pragmatic approach will be used, grammar and other theoretical aspects of the language will be discovered step by step together with the instructor. Students will also practice a lot of phonetics in order to learn how to read, write and spell properly the Italian language sounds.

Homeschool

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Algebra is a way of generalizing arithmetic. It uses letters called variables to represent any value in a given formula so that it becomes a general formula that can be applied to all numbers. In Algebra I we only study problems that use the real number system. Just like it sounds, it is a bunch of numbers that we use in real life and it excludes only the imaginary numbers.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

A primary goal of Algebra 2 is for students to conceptualize, analyze, and identify relationships among functions. Students will develop proficiency in analyzing and solving quadratic functions using complex numbers. Students will investigate and make conjectures about absolute value, radical, exponential, logarithmic and sine and cosine functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically, with and without technology. Students will extend their algebraic skills to compute with rational expressions and rational exponents. Students will work with and build an understanding of complex numbers and systems of equations and inequalities. Students will analyze statistical data and apply concepts of probability using permutations and combinations. Students will use technology such as graphing calculators. Students will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences
Calculus,

Calculus

Calculus is the study of 'Rates of Change'. Calculus as we know it today was developed in the later half of the seventeenth century by two mathematicians, Gottfried Leibniz and Isaac Newton. There are two main branches of calculus: Differential Calculus and Integral Calculus. Differential calculus determines the rate of change of a quantity, integral calculus finds the quantity where the rate of change is known.
Geometry,

Geometry

Geometry is designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. It includes the study of transformations and right triangle trigonometry. Inductive and deductive thinking skills are used in problem solving situations, and applications to the real world are stressed. It also emphasizes writing proofs to solve (prove) properties of geometric figures.
Physics,

Physics

A calculus-based study of the basic concepts of physics. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion, elasticity, fluid mechanics, thermal equilibrium, temperature, and the laws of thermodynamics with applications to ideal gases and thermodynamic processes.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

In Prealgebra we usually explore mathematical concepts that are foundational for success in algebra including algebraic expressions, integers, equations, decimals, fractions, ratios, proportions, percents, area, volume, and probability.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

Precalculus completes the formal study of the elementary functions begun in Algebra 1 and Algebra 2. Students focus on the use of technology, modeling, and problem solving involving data analysis, trigonometric and circular functions, their inverses, polar coordinates, complex numbers, conics, and quadratic relations. Discrete topics include the Principles of Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem, and sequences and series.
SAT Math

SAT Math

SAT Math includes elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry.

Language

Italian

Italian

The aim is to present the basis of spoken and written Italian. During the course the students will learn how to communicate in simple everyday situations and will also get in touch with some relevant Italian cultural features. The course is focused on communication: a pragmatic approach will be used, grammar and other theoretical aspects of the language will be discovered step by step together with the instructor. Students will also practice a lot of phonetics in order to learn how to read, write and spell properly the Italian language sounds.

Math

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Algebra is a way of generalizing arithmetic. It uses letters called variables to represent any value in a given formula so that it becomes a general formula that can be applied to all numbers. In Algebra I we only study problems that use the real number system. Just like it sounds, it is a bunch of numbers that we use in real life and it excludes only the imaginary numbers.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

A primary goal of Algebra 2 is for students to conceptualize, analyze, and identify relationships among functions. Students will develop proficiency in analyzing and solving quadratic functions using complex numbers. Students will investigate and make conjectures about absolute value, radical, exponential, logarithmic and sine and cosine functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically, with and without technology. Students will extend their algebraic skills to compute with rational expressions and rational exponents. Students will work with and build an understanding of complex numbers and systems of equations and inequalities. Students will analyze statistical data and apply concepts of probability using permutations and combinations. Students will use technology such as graphing calculators. Students will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences
Calculus,

Calculus

Calculus is the study of 'Rates of Change'. Calculus as we know it today was developed in the later half of the seventeenth century by two mathematicians, Gottfried Leibniz and Isaac Newton. There are two main branches of calculus: Differential Calculus and Integral Calculus. Differential calculus determines the rate of change of a quantity, integral calculus finds the quantity where the rate of change is known.
Geometry,

Geometry

Geometry is designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. It includes the study of transformations and right triangle trigonometry. Inductive and deductive thinking skills are used in problem solving situations, and applications to the real world are stressed. It also emphasizes writing proofs to solve (prove) properties of geometric figures.
Physics,

Physics

A calculus-based study of the basic concepts of physics. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion, elasticity, fluid mechanics, thermal equilibrium, temperature, and the laws of thermodynamics with applications to ideal gases and thermodynamic processes.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

In Prealgebra we usually explore mathematical concepts that are foundational for success in algebra including algebraic expressions, integers, equations, decimals, fractions, ratios, proportions, percents, area, volume, and probability.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

Precalculus completes the formal study of the elementary functions begun in Algebra 1 and Algebra 2. Students focus on the use of technology, modeling, and problem solving involving data analysis, trigonometric and circular functions, their inverses, polar coordinates, complex numbers, conics, and quadratic relations. Discrete topics include the Principles of Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem, and sequences and series.
Probability,

Probability

The aim is to provide the student with the basic background and knowledge of probability and probability distribution in the discrete case. It helps in developing the student’s understanding and intellectual skills in dealing and modeling the uncertainty when describing random phenomena and experiments. It prepare thereby the student to understand the theory and methods of statistics on different levels in his forthcoming study at statistical program.
SAT Math,

SAT Math

SAT Math includes elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry.
Trigonometry

Trigonometry

Trigonometry is the branch of mathematics concerned with specific functions of angles and their application to calculations. There are six functions of an angle commonly used in trigonometry. Their names and abbreviations are sine (sin), cosine (cos), tangent (tan), cotangent (cot), secant (sec), and cosecant (csc).

Most Popular

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Algebra is a way of generalizing arithmetic. It uses letters called variables to represent any value in a given formula so that it becomes a general formula that can be applied to all numbers. In Algebra I we only study problems that use the real number system. Just like it sounds, it is a bunch of numbers that we use in real life and it excludes only the imaginary numbers.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

A primary goal of Algebra 2 is for students to conceptualize, analyze, and identify relationships among functions. Students will develop proficiency in analyzing and solving quadratic functions using complex numbers. Students will investigate and make conjectures about absolute value, radical, exponential, logarithmic and sine and cosine functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically, with and without technology. Students will extend their algebraic skills to compute with rational expressions and rational exponents. Students will work with and build an understanding of complex numbers and systems of equations and inequalities. Students will analyze statistical data and apply concepts of probability using permutations and combinations. Students will use technology such as graphing calculators. Students will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences
Calculus,

Calculus

Calculus is the study of 'Rates of Change'. Calculus as we know it today was developed in the later half of the seventeenth century by two mathematicians, Gottfried Leibniz and Isaac Newton. There are two main branches of calculus: Differential Calculus and Integral Calculus. Differential calculus determines the rate of change of a quantity, integral calculus finds the quantity where the rate of change is known.
Geometry,

Geometry

Geometry is designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. It includes the study of transformations and right triangle trigonometry. Inductive and deductive thinking skills are used in problem solving situations, and applications to the real world are stressed. It also emphasizes writing proofs to solve (prove) properties of geometric figures.
Physics,

Physics

A calculus-based study of the basic concepts of physics. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion, elasticity, fluid mechanics, thermal equilibrium, temperature, and the laws of thermodynamics with applications to ideal gases and thermodynamic processes.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

In Prealgebra we usually explore mathematical concepts that are foundational for success in algebra including algebraic expressions, integers, equations, decimals, fractions, ratios, proportions, percents, area, volume, and probability.
Precalculus

Precalculus

Precalculus completes the formal study of the elementary functions begun in Algebra 1 and Algebra 2. Students focus on the use of technology, modeling, and problem solving involving data analysis, trigonometric and circular functions, their inverses, polar coordinates, complex numbers, conics, and quadratic relations. Discrete topics include the Principles of Mathematical Induction, the Binomial Theorem, and sequences and series.

Science

Astronomy,

Astronomy

A general program that focuses on the planetary, galactic, and stellar phenomena occurring in outer space. Includes instruction in celestial mechanics, cosmology, stellar physics, galactic evolution, quasars, stellar distribution and motion, interstellar medium, atomic and molecular constituents of astronomical phenomena, planetary science, solar system evolution, and specific methodologies such as optical astronomy, radioastronomy, and theoretical astronomy.
Physical Science,

Physical Science

This usually is a college preparatory course designed to serve as a solid foundation for the study of Physics. Topics to be investigated are phases of matter, force and motion, work, simple machines, conservation and transformation of energy, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. The role of the student in this course is to develop inquiry and problem solving skills within the context of scientific investigation.
Physics

Physics

A calculus-based study of the basic concepts of physics. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion, elasticity, fluid mechanics, thermal equilibrium, temperature, and the laws of thermodynamics with applications to ideal gases and thermodynamic processes.

Sports/Recreation

Cooking,

Cooking

I teach proper skills, procedures and methods to create delicious, healthy meals at home for you and your family. And many of my classes are designed using local organic produce and grass fed meats, as well as local products, staples and accessories easily available to the home cook.
Needlework,

Needlework

Needlework, as defined by "any form of decorative stitching done by hand" seems to be too broad, but there really is not a better way to define it. I have been learning all through my life about the different techniques and find that there is always something new to learn. Included will be all variations of stitchery: stamped embroidery, counted thread stitching, and canvas work, including needlepoint. Discussion might cover different kinds of canvases and fabric grounds, flosses, needles and other supplies, pattern design, marking, and finishing etc.
Sewing

Sewing

This is an introduction to beginners to the basics of sewing: sewing terms, using the sewing machine, selecting fabric, reading a pattern envelope, layout fabric and pattern, marking and cutting fabric. Learn how to interpret the pattern directions and sew each piece together. Another could be teaching to design and make patterns for more advanced learners

Summer

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Algebra is a way of generalizing arithmetic. It uses letters called variables to represent any value in a given formula so that it becomes a general formula that can be applied to all numbers. In Algebra I we only study problems that use the real number system. Just like it sounds, it is a bunch of numbers that we use in real life and it excludes only the imaginary numbers.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

A primary goal of Algebra 2 is for students to conceptualize, analyze, and identify relationships among functions. Students will develop proficiency in analyzing and solving quadratic functions using complex numbers. Students will investigate and make conjectures about absolute value, radical, exponential, logarithmic and sine and cosine functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically, with and without technology. Students will extend their algebraic skills to compute with rational expressions and rational exponents. Students will work with and build an understanding of complex numbers and systems of equations and inequalities. Students will analyze statistical data and apply concepts of probability using permutations and combinations. Students will use technology such as graphing calculators. Students will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life's experiences
Calculus,

Calculus

Calculus is the study of 'Rates of Change'. Calculus as we know it today was developed in the later half of the seventeenth century by two mathematicians, Gottfried Leibniz and Isaac Newton. There are two main branches of calculus: Differential Calculus and Integral Calculus. Differential calculus determines the rate of change of a quantity, integral calculus finds the quantity where the rate of change is known.
Geometry,

Geometry

Geometry is designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. It includes the study of transformations and right triangle trigonometry. Inductive and deductive thinking skills are used in problem solving situations, and applications to the real world are stressed. It also emphasizes writing proofs to solve (prove) properties of geometric figures.
Italian,

Italian

The aim is to present the basis of spoken and written Italian. During the course the students will learn how to communicate in simple everyday situations and will also get in touch with some relevant Italian cultural features. The course is focused on communication: a pragmatic approach will be used, grammar and other theoretical aspects of the language will be discovered step by step together with the instructor. Students will also practice a lot of phonetics in order to learn how to read, write and spell properly the Italian language sounds.
Physics,

Physics

A calculus-based study of the basic concepts of physics. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion, elasticity, fluid mechanics, thermal equilibrium, temperature, and the laws of thermodynamics with applications to ideal gases and thermodynamic processes.
SAT Math

SAT Math

SAT Math includes elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry.

Test Preparation

SAT Math

SAT Math

SAT Math includes elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry.

Examples of Expertise


Grace has provided examples of their subject expertise by answering 2 questions submitted by students on Wyzant’s Ask an Expert.

Ratings and Reviews


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Contact Grace

Response time: 10 minutes

$60/hour

Grace F.

$60/hour

  • No subscriptions or upfront payments

  • Only pay for the time you need

  • Find the right fit, or your first hour is free

Contact Grace

Response time: 10 minutes