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Gabriel E.

Patient, encouraging tutor for physics/math/Python (Stanford grad)

Patient, encouraging tutor for physics/math/Python (Stanford grad)

$80/hour

About Gabriel


Bio

Hi! I'm Gabriel, a Stanford grad with 10 years of experience tutoring physics, math, and Python. I’m a patient and encouraging tutor with a research background in the teaching of physics. Read more about my education, tutoring style, and experience below.

EDUCATION

My B.S. in physics is from Stanford, with distinction. At Stanford, I developed skills for learning counterintuitive physics concepts, solving difficult problems with math, and doing technical research in the lab and in Python....

Hi! I'm Gabriel, a Stanford grad with 10 years of experience tutoring physics, math, and Python. I’m a patient and encouraging tutor with a research background in the teaching of physics. Read more about my education, tutoring style, and experience below.

EDUCATION

My B.S. in physics is from Stanford, with distinction. At Stanford, I developed skills for learning counterintuitive physics concepts, solving difficult problems with math, and doing technical research in the lab and in Python. That's also where I got really excited about teaching physics, math, and Python. My passion for teaching took me to the top-ten physics Ph.D. program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I've been studying physics education research: the science of how people learn physics and the art of how to teach it. My Master's project studied how students find curiosity, excitement, and motivation in physics class. Right now I'm taking a break from school while helping out with research at a science museum in San Francisco.

My education has been both fulfilling and challenging. I know what it's like to struggle with difficult concepts, self-confidence, and a sense of purpose or belonging. A big reason I offer academic support is because it’s meaningful to people who are experiencing personal struggles.

TUTORING STYLE

As a tutor, I'm patient, encouraging, and knowledgeable.

I’m patient. Learning takes thinking, and thinking takes time. I like to let my students can talk through their thoughts at their pace. I listen fully and non-judgmentally before offering my perspective.

I’m encouraging. I believe in every student's ability to learn. The most important thing I do for my students is help them believe in themselves.

I’m knowledgeable. I feel at home in difficult conceptual terrain. When my students get lost, I know how to find them and help them get back on track. My knowledge of how learning works is my compass.

TUTORING EXPERIENCE

Stanford's peer tutoring center was where I really learned how to tutor physics and math. At first it was challenging to help struggling students solve problems I had never seen before; my knowledge was tested by dozens every week. But my training quickly taught me that my listening skills were even more important than my knowledge. Listening carefully and empathetically to my students opened up options for helping them gain clarity from even the most confusing of problems. As I witnessed my students struggle and grow, I cemented my belief that everyone can learn physics and math if they have effective support. In my final year I was selected as a lead tutor and helped train the new recruits in effective tutoring for physics and math. I tutored through Stanford's peer tutoring center for three years before graduating.

At Stanford, I also designed and taught a two-credit Python course for fellow physics majors. In ten weeks, students went from basic coding knowledge to confidently creating a significant project in the terminal. I was involved as a teacher, course designer, or mentor to other teachers for four years.

My tutoring practice is informed by my classroom teaching experience. I worked as a teaching assistant for five semesters in graduate school, in addition to one semester as a substitute teacher at an independent high school and one quarter as an undergraduate. In graduate school, I helped design and teach a next-generation lab course in which students designed their own experiments. I loved that the open-ended design brought out students' imagination and creativity, although this made it a challenging teaching assignment. I learned to quickly assess a student's learning needs and offer encouraging pointers to help them reach understanding.

I've been tutoring privately since 2015. My students have studied subjects ranging from middle school science to graduate school differential equations. They tell me that my support brings them newfound enjoyment, confidence, and success in their studies.


Education

B.S., Physics, with distinction, Stanford University
undergrad
M.S., Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Masters

Policies

  • Hourly Rate: $80
  • Rate details: I offer a full sliding scale for students to whom my standard rate poses a hardship.
  • Lesson cancellation: 4 hours notice required
  • No background check

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

Schedule

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Subjects

Computer

Python

Homeschool

Calculus,

Calculus

Limits, derivatives, related rates, integrals, infinite series... These concepts were all really tough for me when I was first learning them in 10th grade, but after many years of training in physics, I have not only become familiar with them but indeed learned to live and breathe single-variable calculus, as a prerequisite to learning vector calculus, Riemannian geometry, and differential equations. Learning physics has required me both to memorize the details of the the definitions and also arrive at a functional, conceptual understanding of derivatives and integrals, and it is by uniting this pair of tools—the reductionism of language and the holism of visualization—that I have helped my peers at Stanford and other students to understand calculus for themselves. If you find calculus difficult now, don't worry: I can help you understand it too.
Physics,

Physics

Understanding physics feels like having x-ray vision. From rainbows to supernovas, from electric engines to quantum computers, so many parts of the human experience are understood with the same conceptual building blocks: motion, energy, space, and symmetry. With their new knowledge and style of thinking, physics students can acquire an indispensable lens into scientific, engineering, and non-technical pursuits. Unfortunately, most students experience physics courses as a mess of diagrams, formulas, and numbers. Professors teach from the formulas alone, neglecting a conceptual understanding of the math. Problem-based physics tests seem to ask students to calculate quickly and accurately, so that’s what they learn to do. But students in ongoing study will quickly learn that calculation alone isn’t enough to find confident understanding. With my students, I work in two simultaneous brain spaces: the math and the concepts. Every formula has a conceptual interpretation; every concept can be expressed mathematically. Lessons are about searching for that connection, and daunting problems become sources of inspiration. When we carefully pick apart a conceptual knot, my students find new clarity in a concept or its connection to the math. Our short time in lessons gives them new tools for understanding lectures and readings, tackling homework problems, and performing on tests. I believe physics is for everyone. Many of my students may have been taught to believe that they’re not smart enough, or not a good enough student, or otherwise unsuited for developing a confident grasp of such a highly regarded discipline as physics. When my students express their doubts and fears in the supportive space of tutoring, they find that they’re able to draw on hidden strengths and build new confidence. The next time those doubts and fears come up, they don’t have as much power anymore. My background includes the complete high school and undergraduate physics curriculum. I tutor students studying mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light and sound waves, thermodynamics or statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and special or general relativity. I tutor courses based on algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, vector calculus, calculus of variations, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra, and Riemannian geometry. I’m always eager to expand my expertise and would be happy to consider tutoring students in courses not on this list.
Algebra 1

Math

Calculus,

Calculus

Limits, derivatives, related rates, integrals, infinite series... These concepts were all really tough for me when I was first learning them in 10th grade, but after many years of training in physics, I have not only become familiar with them but indeed learned to live and breathe single-variable calculus, as a prerequisite to learning vector calculus, Riemannian geometry, and differential equations. Learning physics has required me both to memorize the details of the the definitions and also arrive at a functional, conceptual understanding of derivatives and integrals, and it is by uniting this pair of tools—the reductionism of language and the holism of visualization—that I have helped my peers at Stanford and other students to understand calculus for themselves. If you find calculus difficult now, don't worry: I can help you understand it too.
Linear Algebra,

Linear Algebra

Linear algebra is the gateway to the world of the professional mathematician. The mathematical objects of interest are high-dimensional space and matrix equations, but in order to study them in rigorous detail we also need mental objects many students aren’t used to: definitions, theorems, and proofs. These are the mathematician’s bread and butter. Studying them opens up a world of possibilities to the curious student, from abstract algebra to quantum physics. Unfortunately, linear algebra courses usually gloss over proof-based mathematics. Everyone knows how to construct a proof by contradiction, right? No, professor, they don’t. As a tutor, I help my students make sense out of set notation, definitions, and the proof-writing process. Once they have that under their belt, the class isn’t such a firehose anymore. Linear algebra courses aren’t known for emphasizing conceptual understanding either. Believe it or not, concepts like vector spaces and linear transformations can be visualized and understood. I offer my students pathways to that understanding through careful examples, illuminating diagrams, and handheld objects. Once the ideas make intuitive sense, calculations and proofs start to feel less like paradoxes and more like jigsaw puzzles.
Physics,

Physics

Understanding physics feels like having x-ray vision. From rainbows to supernovas, from electric engines to quantum computers, so many parts of the human experience are understood with the same conceptual building blocks: motion, energy, space, and symmetry. With their new knowledge and style of thinking, physics students can acquire an indispensable lens into scientific, engineering, and non-technical pursuits. Unfortunately, most students experience physics courses as a mess of diagrams, formulas, and numbers. Professors teach from the formulas alone, neglecting a conceptual understanding of the math. Problem-based physics tests seem to ask students to calculate quickly and accurately, so that’s what they learn to do. But students in ongoing study will quickly learn that calculation alone isn’t enough to find confident understanding. With my students, I work in two simultaneous brain spaces: the math and the concepts. Every formula has a conceptual interpretation; every concept can be expressed mathematically. Lessons are about searching for that connection, and daunting problems become sources of inspiration. When we carefully pick apart a conceptual knot, my students find new clarity in a concept or its connection to the math. Our short time in lessons gives them new tools for understanding lectures and readings, tackling homework problems, and performing on tests. I believe physics is for everyone. Many of my students may have been taught to believe that they’re not smart enough, or not a good enough student, or otherwise unsuited for developing a confident grasp of such a highly regarded discipline as physics. When my students express their doubts and fears in the supportive space of tutoring, they find that they’re able to draw on hidden strengths and build new confidence. The next time those doubts and fears come up, they don’t have as much power anymore. My background includes the complete high school and undergraduate physics curriculum. I tutor students studying mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light and sound waves, thermodynamics or statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and special or general relativity. I tutor courses based on algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, vector calculus, calculus of variations, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra, and Riemannian geometry. I’m always eager to expand my expertise and would be happy to consider tutoring students in courses not on this list.
Algebra 1

Most Popular

Calculus,

Calculus

Limits, derivatives, related rates, integrals, infinite series... These concepts were all really tough for me when I was first learning them in 10th grade, but after many years of training in physics, I have not only become familiar with them but indeed learned to live and breathe single-variable calculus, as a prerequisite to learning vector calculus, Riemannian geometry, and differential equations. Learning physics has required me both to memorize the details of the the definitions and also arrive at a functional, conceptual understanding of derivatives and integrals, and it is by uniting this pair of tools—the reductionism of language and the holism of visualization—that I have helped my peers at Stanford and other students to understand calculus for themselves. If you find calculus difficult now, don't worry: I can help you understand it too.
Physics,

Physics

Understanding physics feels like having x-ray vision. From rainbows to supernovas, from electric engines to quantum computers, so many parts of the human experience are understood with the same conceptual building blocks: motion, energy, space, and symmetry. With their new knowledge and style of thinking, physics students can acquire an indispensable lens into scientific, engineering, and non-technical pursuits. Unfortunately, most students experience physics courses as a mess of diagrams, formulas, and numbers. Professors teach from the formulas alone, neglecting a conceptual understanding of the math. Problem-based physics tests seem to ask students to calculate quickly and accurately, so that’s what they learn to do. But students in ongoing study will quickly learn that calculation alone isn’t enough to find confident understanding. With my students, I work in two simultaneous brain spaces: the math and the concepts. Every formula has a conceptual interpretation; every concept can be expressed mathematically. Lessons are about searching for that connection, and daunting problems become sources of inspiration. When we carefully pick apart a conceptual knot, my students find new clarity in a concept or its connection to the math. Our short time in lessons gives them new tools for understanding lectures and readings, tackling homework problems, and performing on tests. I believe physics is for everyone. Many of my students may have been taught to believe that they’re not smart enough, or not a good enough student, or otherwise unsuited for developing a confident grasp of such a highly regarded discipline as physics. When my students express their doubts and fears in the supportive space of tutoring, they find that they’re able to draw on hidden strengths and build new confidence. The next time those doubts and fears come up, they don’t have as much power anymore. My background includes the complete high school and undergraduate physics curriculum. I tutor students studying mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light and sound waves, thermodynamics or statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and special or general relativity. I tutor courses based on algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, vector calculus, calculus of variations, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra, and Riemannian geometry. I’m always eager to expand my expertise and would be happy to consider tutoring students in courses not on this list.
Algebra 1

Science

Physics

Physics

Understanding physics feels like having x-ray vision. From rainbows to supernovas, from electric engines to quantum computers, so many parts of the human experience are understood with the same conceptual building blocks: motion, energy, space, and symmetry. With their new knowledge and style of thinking, physics students can acquire an indispensable lens into scientific, engineering, and non-technical pursuits. Unfortunately, most students experience physics courses as a mess of diagrams, formulas, and numbers. Professors teach from the formulas alone, neglecting a conceptual understanding of the math. Problem-based physics tests seem to ask students to calculate quickly and accurately, so that’s what they learn to do. But students in ongoing study will quickly learn that calculation alone isn’t enough to find confident understanding. With my students, I work in two simultaneous brain spaces: the math and the concepts. Every formula has a conceptual interpretation; every concept can be expressed mathematically. Lessons are about searching for that connection, and daunting problems become sources of inspiration. When we carefully pick apart a conceptual knot, my students find new clarity in a concept or its connection to the math. Our short time in lessons gives them new tools for understanding lectures and readings, tackling homework problems, and performing on tests. I believe physics is for everyone. Many of my students may have been taught to believe that they’re not smart enough, or not a good enough student, or otherwise unsuited for developing a confident grasp of such a highly regarded discipline as physics. When my students express their doubts and fears in the supportive space of tutoring, they find that they’re able to draw on hidden strengths and build new confidence. The next time those doubts and fears come up, they don’t have as much power anymore. My background includes the complete high school and undergraduate physics curriculum. I tutor students studying mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light and sound waves, thermodynamics or statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and special or general relativity. I tutor courses based on algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, vector calculus, calculus of variations, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra, and Riemannian geometry. I’m always eager to expand my expertise and would be happy to consider tutoring students in courses not on this list.

Summer

Calculus,

Calculus

Limits, derivatives, related rates, integrals, infinite series... These concepts were all really tough for me when I was first learning them in 10th grade, but after many years of training in physics, I have not only become familiar with them but indeed learned to live and breathe single-variable calculus, as a prerequisite to learning vector calculus, Riemannian geometry, and differential equations. Learning physics has required me both to memorize the details of the the definitions and also arrive at a functional, conceptual understanding of derivatives and integrals, and it is by uniting this pair of tools—the reductionism of language and the holism of visualization—that I have helped my peers at Stanford and other students to understand calculus for themselves. If you find calculus difficult now, don't worry: I can help you understand it too.
Physics,

Physics

Understanding physics feels like having x-ray vision. From rainbows to supernovas, from electric engines to quantum computers, so many parts of the human experience are understood with the same conceptual building blocks: motion, energy, space, and symmetry. With their new knowledge and style of thinking, physics students can acquire an indispensable lens into scientific, engineering, and non-technical pursuits. Unfortunately, most students experience physics courses as a mess of diagrams, formulas, and numbers. Professors teach from the formulas alone, neglecting a conceptual understanding of the math. Problem-based physics tests seem to ask students to calculate quickly and accurately, so that’s what they learn to do. But students in ongoing study will quickly learn that calculation alone isn’t enough to find confident understanding. With my students, I work in two simultaneous brain spaces: the math and the concepts. Every formula has a conceptual interpretation; every concept can be expressed mathematically. Lessons are about searching for that connection, and daunting problems become sources of inspiration. When we carefully pick apart a conceptual knot, my students find new clarity in a concept or its connection to the math. Our short time in lessons gives them new tools for understanding lectures and readings, tackling homework problems, and performing on tests. I believe physics is for everyone. Many of my students may have been taught to believe that they’re not smart enough, or not a good enough student, or otherwise unsuited for developing a confident grasp of such a highly regarded discipline as physics. When my students express their doubts and fears in the supportive space of tutoring, they find that they’re able to draw on hidden strengths and build new confidence. The next time those doubts and fears come up, they don’t have as much power anymore. My background includes the complete high school and undergraduate physics curriculum. I tutor students studying mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light and sound waves, thermodynamics or statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and special or general relativity. I tutor courses based on algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, vector calculus, calculus of variations, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra, and Riemannian geometry. I’m always eager to expand my expertise and would be happy to consider tutoring students in courses not on this list.
Algebra 1

Examples of Expertise


Gabriel has provided examples of their subject expertise by answering 1 question submitted by students on Wyzant’s Ask an Expert.

Ratings and Reviews


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Reviews

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Knowledgeable and engaging tutor

I have a 16-year-old son who is struggling with physics. I signed him up for an online lesson with Gabriel and he was quite pessimistic about it. The class was engaging, interesting and easy to follow. My son told me he really enjoyed it and that now he has understanding about his assignment. I am very happy about it as it hasn't been easy to get my teenager interested or engaged in school work. Granted we had only one class so far but I definitely recommend Gabriel for anyone looking to brush up on skills in physics.

Egle, 4 lessons with Gabriel
Contact Gabriel

Response time: 3 hours

$80/hour

Gabriel E.

$80/hour

  • No subscriptions or upfront payments

  • Only pay for the time you need

  • Find the right fit, or your first hour is free

Contact Gabriel

Response time: 3 hours