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Mike P.

Mr. Reading for Enjoyment (and puzzles too)

Mr. Reading for Enjoyment (and puzzles too)

$35/hour

About Mike


Bio

I work with students of all ages one-on-one with a variety of approaches and strategies. I like to put together simple research papers, narratives, poems, songs, and fantasy stories. It is even more fun when we illustrate what we are writing about. An engaging story, read aloud, goes a long way toward bringing up school work performance. Getting a hold of two copies of a book--say, Hunger Games, for example, is not very difficult. For the beginning reader, Patricia Pollcka has written and...

I work with students of all ages one-on-one with a variety of approaches and strategies. I like to put together simple research papers, narratives, poems, songs, and fantasy stories. It is even more fun when we illustrate what we are writing about. An engaging story, read aloud, goes a long way toward bringing up school work performance. Getting a hold of two copies of a book--say, Hunger Games, for example, is not very difficult. For the beginning reader, Patricia Pollcka has written and illustrated a great number of books that engag and inspire the emerging reading skills of young children. Discussing the book--developing the ability to solve context-clue and phonics-clue related components of the story should go hand in hand with a genuine appreciation for the material that is being read. It helps to see the movie afterward, but that would not be on the tutor's clock.

I also like to put children to work on practical problems, like making a pizza from the basic components that comprise it. Here we might: (1) keep a journal of our method and progress, (2) use math skills to increase recipe portions, keep track of expenses, compare to commercially available products, etc., (3) assemble brochures marketing and promoting our product--and anything else that might come to mind.

I have experience from my own classroom, classrooms of teachers I have subbed for, and many hours spent in college classrooms studying education. I also play piano and love to work on musical lessons.


Education

NEIU
undergrad

Policies

  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person
  • Hourly Rate: $35
  • Travel policy: Within 5 miles of Cicero, IL 60804
  • Lesson cancellation: 4 hours notice required
  • No background check

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

Schedule

Mike hasn’t set a schedule.


Subjects

Corporate Training

Grammar

Elementary Education

Elementary (K-6th),

Elementary (K-6th)

(For The Younger Student) I like to use developmentally appropriate activities, usually picture books and chapter books to get the basics of context based decoding and phonics based decoding implemented as we look at the materials and read together. We then write a story or a letter of our own. Finally we draw a picture and discuss how we feel about the matters at hand. For the more capable primary grade student, we can read from a chapter book, then write a critique of what we read. My experience draws on eight years of substitute teaching with Oak Park Schools(Pre-K through 8th grade), one year as a full-time teacher with my own classroom at Good Shepherd School where I taught language arts--a parochial school that was part of the Archdioceses of Chicago in the inner-city community of Little Village, four years with the Chicago Teachers Center of NEIU working with the 21st Century Scholars program for the development of college ready students from the inner-city where I taught language arts, time spent tutoring my clients in a residential treatment facility for abused children in Costa Mesa CA. I have a daughter who is a sixth grader, and we are working on learning songs on the keyboard with accompanying vocals. For any work in this K-6th grade realm, I would insist on documenting the steps we take to improve or enrich our understanding of school material with a folder filled with the outcome of our effort. I am the holder of a valid IL K-9 Initial Teachers Certification.
Phonics,

Phonics

LISTEN, READ, THEN WRITE I have noticed that teachers like to have the tape deck version of a story avail for a student to read along with. I would gladly read the story to the student pointing at the parts of the word that comes up in the story, syllable by syllable. After we read the story, we take a spelling test that features words we have just read. I can sccaffold the effort of the student by sounding out the phoneme and strive toward allowing the student to gain a sense of self-mastery with their reading and writing lesson. Regarding the actual nuts and bolts of decoding a simple set of pictures and sentences,we look at the words on the page and sound out the parts of the words. For instance, the word "surprise." Suh and reapeat suh; then ur and repaeat ur, then puh and reapeat puh, then ruh, repeat, then eye and repeat, finally zuh. We gradually run the sounds together a bit faster and faster, pointing to the phonemes each time with each go-through. Then we come up with words that end with the same sound, like goodbyes, pretty eyes, etc. We write stories and sound out the word as we try to find the right letter for that word. My experience draws on a four-year ELED degree program at NEIU,eight years of substitute teaching with Oak Park Schools(Pre-K through 8th grade), one year as a full-time teacher with my own classroom at Good Shepherd School where I taught language arts--a parochial school that was part of the Archdioceses of Chicago in the inner-city community of Little Village, four years with the Chicago teachers center of NEIU working with the 21st Century Scholars program for the development of college ready students from the inner-city where I taught language arts, and time spent tutoring my clients in a residential treatment facility for abused children in Costa Mesa CA. I have a daughter who is a sixth grader, and we are working on learning songs on the keyboard with accompanying vocals. For any work in this K-6th grade realm, I would insist on documenting the steps we take to improve or enrich our understanding of school material with a folder filled with the outcome of our effort. I am the holder of a valid IL K-9 Initial Teachers Certification.
Reading,

Reading

For children K-8, I insist on decoding the word when it causes the student to pause. I will help scaffold that task by describing the context clues that help us anticipate the word in question. To see the movie upon which a book is based (usually vice-versa) is also very helpful, but that would have to done on the student's own time.
Study Skills,

Study Skills

CHARTS, STICKERS, AND MORE CHARTS. Study skills are about deciding what we want to learn, how much time we want to set aside to learn it, and how we can be sure that we learned anything. This is where planning and assessment come together in tutoring. The point of validation would be the completion or mastery of the lesson, such as when the moment comes where the student reads through the decoding book on her own with no assistance. We then add a sticker to the chart to confirm that we have accomplished something for that lesson. We can also integrate subjects by working on percentage points of improvement in spelling tests, for instance, and making a fun, attractive chart based on that information. I prefer to a series of outlines, and index cards to prepare for the next lesson, building on the knowledge base in a systematic way. Short little multiple-choice quizzes and colorful stickers to attach to successfully completed quizzes are a fine motivator for most students in the K-5 range. For the youngest ones, the forming of a lower-case 'p' may work well instead of a multiple-choice question, and be just as deserving of a colorful sticker. Keeping track of time spent reading or working on puzzles when the tutor is not present can also be useful in collecting a portfolio of study materials that correspond to the school requirements of the student. Self-assessment check lists work well in the realm of study skills also: what do I need to learn the most? (check) Have I set aside time to work on that? (check) Finally, taking pride in writing letters and words that look very much like the instructional material's example goes a long way toward organizing thoughts and allowing those thoughts to be communicated. Just working on writing words that look good on the page can be a cause for better result, not just a good description of a good student.
Elementary Math, Elementary Science, Grammar, Vocabulary

English

Reading,

Reading

For children K-8, I insist on decoding the word when it causes the student to pause. I will help scaffold that task by describing the context clues that help us anticipate the word in question. To see the movie upon which a book is based (usually vice-versa) is also very helpful, but that would have to done on the student's own time.
Grammar, Vocabulary

Homeschool

Elementary (K-6th),

Elementary (K-6th)

(For The Younger Student) I like to use developmentally appropriate activities, usually picture books and chapter books to get the basics of context based decoding and phonics based decoding implemented as we look at the materials and read together. We then write a story or a letter of our own. Finally we draw a picture and discuss how we feel about the matters at hand. For the more capable primary grade student, we can read from a chapter book, then write a critique of what we read. My experience draws on eight years of substitute teaching with Oak Park Schools(Pre-K through 8th grade), one year as a full-time teacher with my own classroom at Good Shepherd School where I taught language arts--a parochial school that was part of the Archdioceses of Chicago in the inner-city community of Little Village, four years with the Chicago Teachers Center of NEIU working with the 21st Century Scholars program for the development of college ready students from the inner-city where I taught language arts, time spent tutoring my clients in a residential treatment facility for abused children in Costa Mesa CA. I have a daughter who is a sixth grader, and we are working on learning songs on the keyboard with accompanying vocals. For any work in this K-6th grade realm, I would insist on documenting the steps we take to improve or enrich our understanding of school material with a folder filled with the outcome of our effort. I am the holder of a valid IL K-9 Initial Teachers Certification.
Reading,

Reading

For children K-8, I insist on decoding the word when it causes the student to pause. I will help scaffold that task by describing the context clues that help us anticipate the word in question. To see the movie upon which a book is based (usually vice-versa) is also very helpful, but that would have to done on the student's own time.
Study Skills

Study Skills

CHARTS, STICKERS, AND MORE CHARTS. Study skills are about deciding what we want to learn, how much time we want to set aside to learn it, and how we can be sure that we learned anything. This is where planning and assessment come together in tutoring. The point of validation would be the completion or mastery of the lesson, such as when the moment comes where the student reads through the decoding book on her own with no assistance. We then add a sticker to the chart to confirm that we have accomplished something for that lesson. We can also integrate subjects by working on percentage points of improvement in spelling tests, for instance, and making a fun, attractive chart based on that information. I prefer to a series of outlines, and index cards to prepare for the next lesson, building on the knowledge base in a systematic way. Short little multiple-choice quizzes and colorful stickers to attach to successfully completed quizzes are a fine motivator for most students in the K-5 range. For the youngest ones, the forming of a lower-case 'p' may work well instead of a multiple-choice question, and be just as deserving of a colorful sticker. Keeping track of time spent reading or working on puzzles when the tutor is not present can also be useful in collecting a portfolio of study materials that correspond to the school requirements of the student. Self-assessment check lists work well in the realm of study skills also: what do I need to learn the most? (check) Have I set aside time to work on that? (check) Finally, taking pride in writing letters and words that look very much like the instructional material's example goes a long way toward organizing thoughts and allowing those thoughts to be communicated. Just working on writing words that look good on the page can be a cause for better result, not just a good description of a good student.

Most Popular

Elementary (K-6th),

Elementary (K-6th)

(For The Younger Student) I like to use developmentally appropriate activities, usually picture books and chapter books to get the basics of context based decoding and phonics based decoding implemented as we look at the materials and read together. We then write a story or a letter of our own. Finally we draw a picture and discuss how we feel about the matters at hand. For the more capable primary grade student, we can read from a chapter book, then write a critique of what we read. My experience draws on eight years of substitute teaching with Oak Park Schools(Pre-K through 8th grade), one year as a full-time teacher with my own classroom at Good Shepherd School where I taught language arts--a parochial school that was part of the Archdioceses of Chicago in the inner-city community of Little Village, four years with the Chicago Teachers Center of NEIU working with the 21st Century Scholars program for the development of college ready students from the inner-city where I taught language arts, time spent tutoring my clients in a residential treatment facility for abused children in Costa Mesa CA. I have a daughter who is a sixth grader, and we are working on learning songs on the keyboard with accompanying vocals. For any work in this K-6th grade realm, I would insist on documenting the steps we take to improve or enrich our understanding of school material with a folder filled with the outcome of our effort. I am the holder of a valid IL K-9 Initial Teachers Certification.
Reading,

Reading

For children K-8, I insist on decoding the word when it causes the student to pause. I will help scaffold that task by describing the context clues that help us anticipate the word in question. To see the movie upon which a book is based (usually vice-versa) is also very helpful, but that would have to done on the student's own time.
Study Skills

Study Skills

CHARTS, STICKERS, AND MORE CHARTS. Study skills are about deciding what we want to learn, how much time we want to set aside to learn it, and how we can be sure that we learned anything. This is where planning and assessment come together in tutoring. The point of validation would be the completion or mastery of the lesson, such as when the moment comes where the student reads through the decoding book on her own with no assistance. We then add a sticker to the chart to confirm that we have accomplished something for that lesson. We can also integrate subjects by working on percentage points of improvement in spelling tests, for instance, and making a fun, attractive chart based on that information. I prefer to a series of outlines, and index cards to prepare for the next lesson, building on the knowledge base in a systematic way. Short little multiple-choice quizzes and colorful stickers to attach to successfully completed quizzes are a fine motivator for most students in the K-5 range. For the youngest ones, the forming of a lower-case 'p' may work well instead of a multiple-choice question, and be just as deserving of a colorful sticker. Keeping track of time spent reading or working on puzzles when the tutor is not present can also be useful in collecting a portfolio of study materials that correspond to the school requirements of the student. Self-assessment check lists work well in the realm of study skills also: what do I need to learn the most? (check) Have I set aside time to work on that? (check) Finally, taking pride in writing letters and words that look very much like the instructional material's example goes a long way toward organizing thoughts and allowing those thoughts to be communicated. Just working on writing words that look good on the page can be a cause for better result, not just a good description of a good student.

Other

Study Skills

Study Skills

CHARTS, STICKERS, AND MORE CHARTS. Study skills are about deciding what we want to learn, how much time we want to set aside to learn it, and how we can be sure that we learned anything. This is where planning and assessment come together in tutoring. The point of validation would be the completion or mastery of the lesson, such as when the moment comes where the student reads through the decoding book on her own with no assistance. We then add a sticker to the chart to confirm that we have accomplished something for that lesson. We can also integrate subjects by working on percentage points of improvement in spelling tests, for instance, and making a fun, attractive chart based on that information. I prefer to a series of outlines, and index cards to prepare for the next lesson, building on the knowledge base in a systematic way. Short little multiple-choice quizzes and colorful stickers to attach to successfully completed quizzes are a fine motivator for most students in the K-5 range. For the youngest ones, the forming of a lower-case 'p' may work well instead of a multiple-choice question, and be just as deserving of a colorful sticker. Keeping track of time spent reading or working on puzzles when the tutor is not present can also be useful in collecting a portfolio of study materials that correspond to the school requirements of the student. Self-assessment check lists work well in the realm of study skills also: what do I need to learn the most? (check) Have I set aside time to work on that? (check) Finally, taking pride in writing letters and words that look very much like the instructional material's example goes a long way toward organizing thoughts and allowing those thoughts to be communicated. Just working on writing words that look good on the page can be a cause for better result, not just a good description of a good student.

Special Needs

Phonics,

Phonics

LISTEN, READ, THEN WRITE I have noticed that teachers like to have the tape deck version of a story avail for a student to read along with. I would gladly read the story to the student pointing at the parts of the word that comes up in the story, syllable by syllable. After we read the story, we take a spelling test that features words we have just read. I can sccaffold the effort of the student by sounding out the phoneme and strive toward allowing the student to gain a sense of self-mastery with their reading and writing lesson. Regarding the actual nuts and bolts of decoding a simple set of pictures and sentences,we look at the words on the page and sound out the parts of the words. For instance, the word "surprise." Suh and reapeat suh; then ur and repaeat ur, then puh and reapeat puh, then ruh, repeat, then eye and repeat, finally zuh. We gradually run the sounds together a bit faster and faster, pointing to the phonemes each time with each go-through. Then we come up with words that end with the same sound, like goodbyes, pretty eyes, etc. We write stories and sound out the word as we try to find the right letter for that word. My experience draws on a four-year ELED degree program at NEIU,eight years of substitute teaching with Oak Park Schools(Pre-K through 8th grade), one year as a full-time teacher with my own classroom at Good Shepherd School where I taught language arts--a parochial school that was part of the Archdioceses of Chicago in the inner-city community of Little Village, four years with the Chicago teachers center of NEIU working with the 21st Century Scholars program for the development of college ready students from the inner-city where I taught language arts, and time spent tutoring my clients in a residential treatment facility for abused children in Costa Mesa CA. I have a daughter who is a sixth grader, and we are working on learning songs on the keyboard with accompanying vocals. For any work in this K-6th grade realm, I would insist on documenting the steps we take to improve or enrich our understanding of school material with a folder filled with the outcome of our effort. I am the holder of a valid IL K-9 Initial Teachers Certification.
Study Skills

Study Skills

CHARTS, STICKERS, AND MORE CHARTS. Study skills are about deciding what we want to learn, how much time we want to set aside to learn it, and how we can be sure that we learned anything. This is where planning and assessment come together in tutoring. The point of validation would be the completion or mastery of the lesson, such as when the moment comes where the student reads through the decoding book on her own with no assistance. We then add a sticker to the chart to confirm that we have accomplished something for that lesson. We can also integrate subjects by working on percentage points of improvement in spelling tests, for instance, and making a fun, attractive chart based on that information. I prefer to a series of outlines, and index cards to prepare for the next lesson, building on the knowledge base in a systematic way. Short little multiple-choice quizzes and colorful stickers to attach to successfully completed quizzes are a fine motivator for most students in the K-5 range. For the youngest ones, the forming of a lower-case 'p' may work well instead of a multiple-choice question, and be just as deserving of a colorful sticker. Keeping track of time spent reading or working on puzzles when the tutor is not present can also be useful in collecting a portfolio of study materials that correspond to the school requirements of the student. Self-assessment check lists work well in the realm of study skills also: what do I need to learn the most? (check) Have I set aside time to work on that? (check) Finally, taking pride in writing letters and words that look very much like the instructional material's example goes a long way toward organizing thoughts and allowing those thoughts to be communicated. Just working on writing words that look good on the page can be a cause for better result, not just a good description of a good student.

Summer

Elementary (K-6th),

Elementary (K-6th)

(For The Younger Student) I like to use developmentally appropriate activities, usually picture books and chapter books to get the basics of context based decoding and phonics based decoding implemented as we look at the materials and read together. We then write a story or a letter of our own. Finally we draw a picture and discuss how we feel about the matters at hand. For the more capable primary grade student, we can read from a chapter book, then write a critique of what we read. My experience draws on eight years of substitute teaching with Oak Park Schools(Pre-K through 8th grade), one year as a full-time teacher with my own classroom at Good Shepherd School where I taught language arts--a parochial school that was part of the Archdioceses of Chicago in the inner-city community of Little Village, four years with the Chicago Teachers Center of NEIU working with the 21st Century Scholars program for the development of college ready students from the inner-city where I taught language arts, time spent tutoring my clients in a residential treatment facility for abused children in Costa Mesa CA. I have a daughter who is a sixth grader, and we are working on learning songs on the keyboard with accompanying vocals. For any work in this K-6th grade realm, I would insist on documenting the steps we take to improve or enrich our understanding of school material with a folder filled with the outcome of our effort. I am the holder of a valid IL K-9 Initial Teachers Certification.
Reading,

Reading

For children K-8, I insist on decoding the word when it causes the student to pause. I will help scaffold that task by describing the context clues that help us anticipate the word in question. To see the movie upon which a book is based (usually vice-versa) is also very helpful, but that would have to done on the student's own time.
Study Skills

Study Skills

CHARTS, STICKERS, AND MORE CHARTS. Study skills are about deciding what we want to learn, how much time we want to set aside to learn it, and how we can be sure that we learned anything. This is where planning and assessment come together in tutoring. The point of validation would be the completion or mastery of the lesson, such as when the moment comes where the student reads through the decoding book on her own with no assistance. We then add a sticker to the chart to confirm that we have accomplished something for that lesson. We can also integrate subjects by working on percentage points of improvement in spelling tests, for instance, and making a fun, attractive chart based on that information. I prefer to a series of outlines, and index cards to prepare for the next lesson, building on the knowledge base in a systematic way. Short little multiple-choice quizzes and colorful stickers to attach to successfully completed quizzes are a fine motivator for most students in the K-5 range. For the youngest ones, the forming of a lower-case 'p' may work well instead of a multiple-choice question, and be just as deserving of a colorful sticker. Keeping track of time spent reading or working on puzzles when the tutor is not present can also be useful in collecting a portfolio of study materials that correspond to the school requirements of the student. Self-assessment check lists work well in the realm of study skills also: what do I need to learn the most? (check) Have I set aside time to work on that? (check) Finally, taking pride in writing letters and words that look very much like the instructional material's example goes a long way toward organizing thoughts and allowing those thoughts to be communicated. Just working on writing words that look good on the page can be a cause for better result, not just a good description of a good student.

$35/hour

Mike P.

$35/hour

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