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John K.

Educated and Experienced Math and Science Teacher

Educated and Experienced Math and Science Teacher

$50/hour

  • 3 hours tutoring

About John


Bio

I fell in love with teaching during my college days. My professors gave me the opportunity to teach a few classes of my own, and I soon discovered the joy of helping students to reach that "aha" moment when everything becomes clear. Now, I'm trying to bring those "aha" moments to students of math, from prealgebra through calculus and statistics.

Brief Bio: While obtaining my Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, I taught thermodynamics a few times. I enjoyed it enormously, and my students...

I fell in love with teaching during my college days. My professors gave me the opportunity to teach a few classes of my own, and I soon discovered the joy of helping students to reach that "aha" moment when everything becomes clear. Now, I'm trying to bring those "aha" moments to students of math, from prealgebra through calculus and statistics.

Brief Bio: While obtaining my Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, I taught thermodynamics a few times. I enjoyed it enormously, and my students seemed to think I was pretty good at it, so I chose to pursue a career in education. I spent many years developing my own science curriculum for children, and for the last few years I've been building my own website devoted to astronomy education. I have also taught various math subjects to various ages. Recently, I taught a "Mathematics in Everyday Life" course to college freshmen and I tutored students through a first-year Statistics course.

My Approach: I want to help you learn to master the tools of math, by breaking complex procedures down into simple pieces, and by helping you to see the reasons we do things the way that we do at each step. You become a more confident and more flexible problem-solver that way, able to choose the right tool for the job, and able to adapt to changing circumstances and changing requirements.

My Subjects: I've been using math my entire life. I lived and breathed algebra and calculus during my years as an engineer, and during my recent work with astronomy I've been especially reliant on my skills in trigonometry. So I'm quite handy with any area of math up through calculus, although I'm a little rusty with differential equations. I'm also comfortable with first-year probability and statistics, although I'm not familiar with modern specializations, like "Statistics for Psychology" or "Statistics for Business".

Please feel free to contact me with any questions. I'd enjoy hearing about what you are learning, and discussing whether there is anything I can do to help you.


Education

The University of Iowa
Physics
The University of Iowa
Masters
The University of Iowa
PhD

Policies


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Subjects

Corporate Training

Statistics

Statistics

Statistics as a subject is becoming very widespread. I may not be familiar with many of the subject specializations that are popping up (Statistics for Psychology, Statistics for Business, etc.), but I'm quite comfortable with the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics (measures of center and dispersion, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing). I recently tutored college students through a first-year statistics course covering these topics.

Elementary Education

Elementary Math

Elementary Math

I taught science to elementary and middle school students for 13 years. I have never led an elementary math class, but I have taught math classes at the middle school and college levels, and I tutored elementary math (including fractions, decimals, percents, and geometry) for about a year at a private company.

Homeschool

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Sometimes there are skills that are very useful, but only in a certain specialized area. Algebra I deals with foundational skills that are useful for life for everyone -- certainly for everyone going into a STEM profession, but also I think for any educated person in the modern world. I have been solving equations, using the quadratic formula, and making graphs for my entire adult life, and I have a year or two of experience teaching or tutoring these subjects as well. (Also, if you deal with computer graphics as I do, you will frequently deal with polynomials in the form of Bezier curves, which are used extensively in vector graphics to draw curved shapes.)
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

The concept of "functions" and the skill of dealing with functions of various kinds is vital to anyone going into science, math, or engineering. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of various paper astronomical cut-out projects, I use functions almost daily. Trigonometric functions are especially useful in astronomy, but polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions are common in engineering and science as well. Algebra II also sometimes includes an introduction to probability and statistics, which I recently tutored, and an introduction to calculus, which I used extensively in my former career as an engineer.
Calculus,

Calculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with CFD (computational fluid dynamics), and my PhD dissertation involved a new technique of Fourier analysis that I invented. Both of these involved heavy amounts of calculus.
Geometry,

Geometry

As a science teacher, I developed many paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres that students could cut out and make. This was fun for me and for them, but more to the point: Calculating where to draw the lines in the designs involved large amounts of geometry.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Being able to deal fluently with negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and proportions are skills that are useful to any citizen of the modern world. They are also essential for anyone going into a STEM career. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of paper sundials and other astronomical paper cut-out projects, I use these skills daily, and I recently taught a "Math in Everyday Life" class to college freshmen that covered many of these same topics.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with logarithms, complex numbers, and trigonometry. I also run a website devoted to astronomy education, which presents paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres of my own design -- and the design of these things involved extensive amounts of trigonometry and geometry.
Statistics

Statistics

Statistics as a subject is becoming very widespread. I may not be familiar with many of the subject specializations that are popping up (Statistics for Psychology, Statistics for Business, etc.), but I'm quite comfortable with the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics (measures of center and dispersion, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing). I recently tutored college students through a first-year statistics course covering these topics.

Math

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Sometimes there are skills that are very useful, but only in a certain specialized area. Algebra I deals with foundational skills that are useful for life for everyone -- certainly for everyone going into a STEM profession, but also I think for any educated person in the modern world. I have been solving equations, using the quadratic formula, and making graphs for my entire adult life, and I have a year or two of experience teaching or tutoring these subjects as well. (Also, if you deal with computer graphics as I do, you will frequently deal with polynomials in the form of Bezier curves, which are used extensively in vector graphics to draw curved shapes.)
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

The concept of "functions" and the skill of dealing with functions of various kinds is vital to anyone going into science, math, or engineering. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of various paper astronomical cut-out projects, I use functions almost daily. Trigonometric functions are especially useful in astronomy, but polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions are common in engineering and science as well. Algebra II also sometimes includes an introduction to probability and statistics, which I recently tutored, and an introduction to calculus, which I used extensively in my former career as an engineer.
Calculus,

Calculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with CFD (computational fluid dynamics), and my PhD dissertation involved a new technique of Fourier analysis that I invented. Both of these involved heavy amounts of calculus.
Geometry,

Geometry

As a science teacher, I developed many paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres that students could cut out and make. This was fun for me and for them, but more to the point: Calculating where to draw the lines in the designs involved large amounts of geometry.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Being able to deal fluently with negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and proportions are skills that are useful to any citizen of the modern world. They are also essential for anyone going into a STEM career. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of paper sundials and other astronomical paper cut-out projects, I use these skills daily, and I recently taught a "Math in Everyday Life" class to college freshmen that covered many of these same topics.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with logarithms, complex numbers, and trigonometry. I also run a website devoted to astronomy education, which presents paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres of my own design -- and the design of these things involved extensive amounts of trigonometry and geometry.
Statistics,

Statistics

Statistics as a subject is becoming very widespread. I may not be familiar with many of the subject specializations that are popping up (Statistics for Psychology, Statistics for Business, etc.), but I'm quite comfortable with the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics (measures of center and dispersion, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing). I recently tutored college students through a first-year statistics course covering these topics.
Trigonometry,

Trigonometry

As a science teacher, I developed many paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres that students could cut out and make. This was fun for me and for them, but more to the point: Calculating where to draw the lines in the designs involved large amounts of trigonometry -- both "normal" planar trigonometry, and spherical trigonometry.
Probability

Most Popular

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Sometimes there are skills that are very useful, but only in a certain specialized area. Algebra I deals with foundational skills that are useful for life for everyone -- certainly for everyone going into a STEM profession, but also I think for any educated person in the modern world. I have been solving equations, using the quadratic formula, and making graphs for my entire adult life, and I have a year or two of experience teaching or tutoring these subjects as well. (Also, if you deal with computer graphics as I do, you will frequently deal with polynomials in the form of Bezier curves, which are used extensively in vector graphics to draw curved shapes.)
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

The concept of "functions" and the skill of dealing with functions of various kinds is vital to anyone going into science, math, or engineering. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of various paper astronomical cut-out projects, I use functions almost daily. Trigonometric functions are especially useful in astronomy, but polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions are common in engineering and science as well. Algebra II also sometimes includes an introduction to probability and statistics, which I recently tutored, and an introduction to calculus, which I used extensively in my former career as an engineer.
Calculus,

Calculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with CFD (computational fluid dynamics), and my PhD dissertation involved a new technique of Fourier analysis that I invented. Both of these involved heavy amounts of calculus.
Geometry,

Geometry

As a science teacher, I developed many paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres that students could cut out and make. This was fun for me and for them, but more to the point: Calculating where to draw the lines in the designs involved large amounts of geometry.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Being able to deal fluently with negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and proportions are skills that are useful to any citizen of the modern world. They are also essential for anyone going into a STEM career. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of paper sundials and other astronomical paper cut-out projects, I use these skills daily, and I recently taught a "Math in Everyday Life" class to college freshmen that covered many of these same topics.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with logarithms, complex numbers, and trigonometry. I also run a website devoted to astronomy education, which presents paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres of my own design -- and the design of these things involved extensive amounts of trigonometry and geometry.
Statistics

Statistics

Statistics as a subject is becoming very widespread. I may not be familiar with many of the subject specializations that are popping up (Statistics for Psychology, Statistics for Business, etc.), but I'm quite comfortable with the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics (measures of center and dispersion, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing). I recently tutored college students through a first-year statistics course covering these topics.

Science

Astronomy

Astronomy

I taught science to elementary and middle school students for 13 years, developing my own curriculum along the way. In Astronomy, I developed constellation charts for identifying constellations, as well as various paper cut-outs (sundials, astrolabes, planispheres, etc.) that students could make. I currently run my own website devoted to astronomy education.

Summer

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Sometimes there are skills that are very useful, but only in a certain specialized area. Algebra I deals with foundational skills that are useful for life for everyone -- certainly for everyone going into a STEM profession, but also I think for any educated person in the modern world. I have been solving equations, using the quadratic formula, and making graphs for my entire adult life, and I have a year or two of experience teaching or tutoring these subjects as well. (Also, if you deal with computer graphics as I do, you will frequently deal with polynomials in the form of Bezier curves, which are used extensively in vector graphics to draw curved shapes.)
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

The concept of "functions" and the skill of dealing with functions of various kinds is vital to anyone going into science, math, or engineering. As a former engineer, as a teacher, and as the developer of various paper astronomical cut-out projects, I use functions almost daily. Trigonometric functions are especially useful in astronomy, but polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions are common in engineering and science as well. Algebra II also sometimes includes an introduction to probability and statistics, which I recently tutored, and an introduction to calculus, which I used extensively in my former career as an engineer.
Calculus,

Calculus

In my former life as an engineer, I worked extensively with CFD (computational fluid dynamics), and my PhD dissertation involved a new technique of Fourier analysis that I invented. Both of these involved heavy amounts of calculus.
Geometry,

Geometry

As a science teacher, I developed many paper sundials, astrolabes, and planispheres that students could cut out and make. This was fun for me and for them, but more to the point: Calculating where to draw the lines in the designs involved large amounts of geometry.
Statistics

Statistics

Statistics as a subject is becoming very widespread. I may not be familiar with many of the subject specializations that are popping up (Statistics for Psychology, Statistics for Business, etc.), but I'm quite comfortable with the basics of descriptive and inferential statistics (measures of center and dispersion, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing). I recently tutored college students through a first-year statistics course covering these topics.

Examples of Expertise


John has provided examples of their subject expertise by answering 2 questions submitted by students on Wyzant’s Ask an Expert.

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Contact John

Response time: 29 minutes

$50/hour

John K.'s Photo

John K.

$50/hour

  • No subscriptions or upfront payments

  • Only pay for the time you need

  • Find the right fit, or your first hour is free

Contact John

Response time: 29 minutes