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Raymond B.

Math, microeconomics or criminal justice

Math, microeconomics or criminal justice

$35/hour

About Raymond


Bio

I have seven academic degrees, doctorate, master's, bachelor's and four associate degrees. Law, economics, philosophy, engineering, science, criminal justice and a second graduate economics degree with emphasis in mathematics. I enjoy math and criminal justice. I also have tutoring experience in microeconomics, which seems to be required in most business programs. I have a natural uncanny understanding of microeconomics. I know legal courses, such as you might find in criminal justice,...

I have seven academic degrees, doctorate, master's, bachelor's and four associate degrees. Law, economics, philosophy, engineering, science, criminal justice and a second graduate economics degree with emphasis in mathematics. I enjoy math and criminal justice. I also have tutoring experience in microeconomics, which seems to be required in most business programs. I have a natural uncanny understanding of microeconomics. I know legal courses, such as you might find in criminal justice, paralegal courses, business law, or sometimes in political science.

I have taught in community colleges, about ten years, in math, economics, philosophy and legal writing. I took the GRE in January 2014, with a 93 percentile on the writing portion, or a 5.0. I taught trigonometry, brief calculus, finite mathematics which included statistics, and every level of algebra from introductory to college algebra.

I recently obtained an engineering associate's degree, awarded May 2013, which was heavily mathematical, requiring linear algebra and differential equations. My master's degree in economics was with a mathematics option, which included econometrics and mathematical economics, with calculus I obtained an associate's degree in administration of justice Dec. 2013, which is primarily criminal justice.

I enjoy math of any kind, microeconomics and any criminal justice course. My father was very mathematical. I think I inherited his genes. He used to teach relatives the "rule of 9's" to check arithmetic. I was surprised he taught them all so well. I think it's worth knowing, to avoid mistakes.


Education

UCLA
economics philosophy
California State University at Los Angeles
Masters
Arizona State University
J.D.

Policies

  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person
  • Hourly Rate: $35
  • Travel policy: Within 30 miles of Atlanta, GA 30318
  • Lesson cancellation: 8 hours notice required
  • Background check passed on 4/17/2014

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

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Subjects

Business

Criminal Justice,

Criminal Justice

I have a J.D. degree, a doctorate in law. I also have an Associate's degree in Administration of Justice. It is the same as a criminal justice degree. All the courses were in criminal justice. I graduated with highest honors. I have been involved in criminal defense work for a couple decades.
Law,

Law

I have a J.D., or law degree. I also have an associate's degree in administration of justice studies. I have worked in law related fields for decades. I have taught legal writing in prisons, sponsored by local community colleges. I am also currently licensed to practice law in one state, although I am semi-retired.
Microeconomics

Microeconomics

I have an M.A. and B.A., master's and bachelor's degrees in economics. I graduated from California State University with a 3.89 GPA for the master's degree. All economics courses were A's. I tutored in microeconomics last year. The student received an A. I especially understand microeconomics, as it, in my opinion, is more mathematical and logical. In particular, elasticities are more easily understood if you know calculus. I have taught microeconomics in community colleges for several years. I have taught macro, but I prefer micro.

Corporate Training

Law,

Law

I have a J.D., or law degree. I also have an associate's degree in administration of justice studies. I have worked in law related fields for decades. I have taught legal writing in prisons, sponsored by local community colleges. I am also currently licensed to practice law in one state, although I am semi-retired.
Microeconomics,

Microeconomics

I have an M.A. and B.A., master's and bachelor's degrees in economics. I graduated from California State University with a 3.89 GPA for the master's degree. All economics courses were A's. I tutored in microeconomics last year. The student received an A. I especially understand microeconomics, as it, in my opinion, is more mathematical and logical. In particular, elasticities are more easily understood if you know calculus. I have taught microeconomics in community colleges for several years. I have taught macro, but I prefer micro.
Statistics

History

American History,

American History

I received over 700 on the American history SAT test. I took 2 American history courses in high school. I took 4 American history courses in college, at UCLA and a community college. I received all A's. I also took world history courses that, in part, dealt with American history.
Bible Studies,

Bible Studies

I have taken two semesters on the Bible, one on the Old Testament, one on the New. Both courses were taken from the chaplain at the VA Hospital in Tucson, Arizona. He also taught at Grand Canyon University and Pima Community College. He served in Iraq. I got A's in both courses. I have had other religion courses, about four, and other philosophy courses some related to religion, ten or more which discussed religion and the Bible. My personal background involves relatives and friends from an assortment of christian churches, Quakers, fundamentalist Baptists, Lutherans, Catholics, Seventh Day Adventists, Episcopalians, and Jehovah's Witnesses. My personal view is the real dispute is not so much literalism versus allegories, but what degree of literalism is used and where, for a particular interpretation or verse. Currently, I attend a church with a Bible study that has the Gospel of Thomas as the focus with related gospel passages. I feel comfortable with either a fundamentalist person, a "progressive" interpretation, or anywhere in between, whatever a student wants. That may sound a little indecisive or evasive, but I like a wide perspective, while realizing most people do center on a particular viewpoint. I could be supportive to anyone of faith in any particular Bible interpretation, such as Creationism or Bishop Spong's "Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism' which seems to be really Tillich's ground of being viewpoint. I have been surprised at how often Bible verses show up in secular places, such as on the UN building with an Isaiah quote, or Abraham Lincoln's united we stand. Obama publicly repeated Isaiah 9:10 at Ground Zero. Years ago I learned a little Hebrew, while attending a Jewish Temple. I think Hebrew helps in the Old Testament. Geography, history and culture are useful too. I do not feel I should impose my views, which are a little indecisive anyway, on anyone. But I try to stay knowledgeable about Bible topics and current events related to the Bible. In particular, I was surprised to see how the JEPD Torah theory is still widely presented as universally accepted, yet in the past 30 years, major criticisms and alternative theories have been advanced. Depending on your predisposition, you could use the criticism to argue Moses is the author, or to just have an alternative secular theory. I took a philosophy course from an instructor who presented JEPD as beyond dispute, as his father had been a pastor and learned it. The book of Daniel is interesting. I took a Western Civilization or world history course and paid close attention to the corresponding secular history. Bible scholars have changed their views over the years. I have read several C.S. Lewis books. Lewis is a literature expert, and the Bible as literature is another perspective. He has perhaps an Anglican fundamentalist Bible view. I have never taught a Sunday school class, probably because I would feel uncomfortable trying to comply with the church's particular objectives. In contrast, I would have no difficulty trying to give a particular individual or student the objective and viewpoint they wanted, even if it may not be near what I might be thinking, but also compare their view with what the text or course seems to be requiring. Bible viewpoints are in flux, including mine. I met a woman in a Bible study who believed in astrology. While I don't believe in astrology, I gave her verses that supported her viewpoint, the 3 wise men following a star, as astrologers, and Jesus saying look for the man carrying a water pitcher, which definitely sounds like Aquarius, following Pisces, the fish, symbol of Jesus, at least the acronym in Greek. I am familiar with Bible translations, three Catholic versions, Jehovah's Witnesses', George Lamsa's Aramaic, Living translation or paraphrasing, King James New King James, Revised Standard and numerous others. I have read "Science of God" by an MIT physicist, Gerald Schoeder, who looks at the Hebrew Old Testament. He translates 7 days of creation as corresponding to 13 billion years after an Einstein time translation. More liberal interpretations focus on allegories and the moral teaching. Conservatives look to a literal translation to support the moral teaching. I still clearly remember the senior pastor in my church, who had a doctorate in divinity while working on a 2nd doctorate, confuse Esther and Ruth, concerning which book never mentioned God. He said Ruth. I knew it was Esther and lovingly "corrected" him. Antony Flew, the former atheist now deist, has a book, There is a God, with an appendix on how the gospels and Jesus treat women. The surprise is Jesus treated women as equals, in contrast to the Jewish culture and era of the time, and in contrast to virtually any teachings of the time, such as Aristotle and Plato or neoplatonism, other religions or cultures.
Geography,

Geography

I have an interest in history, with about eight history courses completed. Each history course is virtually a geography course. History is about wars, and wars take place virtually everywhere on earth. That gives a geography background just knowing what happened, where and when. My father used to have maps all over his rooms. My favorite maps were linguistic, giving instead of national boundaries, colored areas where different languages were spoken. They tended to explain where the wars occurred as well. For example, Basque separatist movements involve a group with a unique language in Europe, unlike any other.
Government & Politics,

Government & Politics

I have been a Democrat, a Republican, a Libertarian, a Green and an independent. I can recite every American president, in order, but not all their wives. I have a J.D. in law and an associate's degree with highest honors in administration of justice studies. I have taken two political science courses, focusing on the constitution and government. I have two degrees in economics. Politics and government involve economics and money. I have taken six history courses. Much of history is politics and changing governments. I got involved in some local political campaigns. Low information voters decide elections, along with last minute personal attacks on the opponent. My academic degrees in law, economics, and philosophy are each a part of government and politics. I have taken about 15 philosophy courses, including philosophy of law, ethics and social values, and courses dealing with government, such as Plato's Republic. I have taken about 40 law courses, all dealing with some aspect of government. I have had possibly 40 economics course, all dealing with the major influence or objective of political figures, how to redistribute wealth or create wealth. We used to have merit selection for federal employees. Now we have more of the spoils system and reward for political loyalty. No one got fired over 9/11. No one got fired over Benghazi. Our system rewards loyalty over competence. But I am open to any political view, marxist to libertarian, or anything in between. We need more creative ideas and less ideological ideas. In the private sphere, what works makes money. In the political sphere what works gets less funding, and what does not work gets more funding, to keep it going.
Philosophy,

Philosophy

I have a bachelor's degree in philosophy from UCLA. I graduated cum laude. I have taught business ethics in a community college philosophy department in Mesa, Arizona. I also took about 7 more philosophy courses in the past couple years, planning to teach philosophy in one of these areas, including standard courses: logic, intro to philosophy, philosophy of religion; God, mind & matter, ethics and social values, philosophy of science. I also took an ancient philosophy course at the University of Arizona in 2010, on Plato and Aristotle. I received an A and perfect score on one test that the instructor used to illustrate to other students what he wanted for answers. Philosophy, in many ways, is like mathematics. Many of the classic mathematicians are also philosophers, and vice versa. I have a math background as well. Philosophy is possibly the only basic college academic field where discussion of religion and God are not only allowed but required. I have several religion courses as well, all A's.
Religion

Religion

I have a bachelor's degree from UCLA in philosophy. I graduated cum laude. The degree was a double major. The philosophy degree included course in philosophy of religion. I earned another recent associate's degree which included about 7 philosophy courses and 5 religion courses, including Asian religion, Old Testament, New Testament, philosophy of religion, and religion in popular culture. I attend a local Atlanta church, where the senior pastor has one doctor's degree in divinity and is working on a second doctorate. When he discusses the Bible, I sometimes correct him, which is probably impolite, but I couldn't help it. He got Esther and Ruth mixed up. They used Bishop Spong's book on fundamentalism which is out of date as to current JEPD theories. I knew more about George Lamsa's Aramaic Bible than he did, and he was taking graduate course in it. My Asian religion course covered Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism (or Taoism), Shintoism and Confucianism. I used to attend a synagogue and learned a little Hebrew. I also took a philosophy course, "Mind, Matter and God," with a community college professor, who just semi-retired. He told me he could use him as a reference if I wanted one. His name is Stu Barr, at Pima Community College, Tucson, Arizona. I took other religious courses from another philosophy professor at Pima Community College, Paul Lee. He would likely give a reference as well. He liked my two novel ontological arguments for the existence of God, similar to Anselm's. I took two other religion courses from the chaplain at the VA Hospital in Tucson. This was all in the past couple years. Going back much further, I took a philosophy of religion course from UCLA Professor Albritton, who probably retired years ago. He gave me an A. All religion courses were A's. The Asian religion course about a year or so ago, was taught by an instructor named Billings. I wrote a lengthy paper on the Falun Gong in China. It was so lengthy, closer to novel size, he would have to remember it. Falun Gong is a composite of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Traditional Chinese Medicine. I've visited endless churches, including the Nation of Islam, although they did watch white people very carefully. I keep an open mind, and focus on facts and history. I must have picked that up like my Asian instructor Billings, as he avoided giving his personal views at every step, unlike many other instructors.

Homeschool

Calculus,

Calculus

In high school, I passed the Advanced Placement test for calculus. I took more advanced calculus courses in college. including graduate economics courses that involved calculus and engineering courses using calculus. I taught "Brief Calculus" several semesters, an abbreviated calculus course designed for business majors. I took a probability upper division course at the University of Arizona, which required calculus.
Microeconomics,

Microeconomics

I have an M.A. and B.A., master's and bachelor's degrees in economics. I graduated from California State University with a 3.89 GPA for the master's degree. All economics courses were A's. I tutored in microeconomics last year. The student received an A. I especially understand microeconomics, as it, in my opinion, is more mathematical and logical. In particular, elasticities are more easily understood if you know calculus. I have taught microeconomics in community colleges for several years. I have taught macro, but I prefer micro.
Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Prealgebra, Precalculus, SAT Math, Statistics

Math

Calculus,

Calculus

In high school, I passed the Advanced Placement test for calculus. I took more advanced calculus courses in college. including graduate economics courses that involved calculus and engineering courses using calculus. I taught "Brief Calculus" several semesters, an abbreviated calculus course designed for business majors. I took a probability upper division course at the University of Arizona, which required calculus.
Finite Math,

Finite Math

I taught one finite math course, in Mohave Community College, Kingman, Arizona, years ago. "Finite math" seems to be a mixture of statistics and matrix algebra. At least that was the course and text I taught. I've had about ten statistics courses, one upper division probability course, and three courses in matrix algebra, linear algebra and the Simplex method. I believe that covers the basic "finite math" material. "Finite math" also seems to include any topic in math up to but not including calculus, or possibly a slight preview of calculus. I took another course, "topics in math" that included a grab bag collection of topics of probability, logic, business or finance or business math, such as calculating mortgage payments. Calculus has continuous functions and sets. Finite math is discrete math, with discrete variables. Apparently "discrete math," as another math course, is a slightly more advanced version of "finite math." I feel very comfortable with statistics, probability and matrix algebra. If there are more topics in a particular "finite math" course, I have probably studied them at some point, and they are not that difficult.
Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Prealgebra, Precalculus, Probability, SAT Math, Statistics, Trigonometry

Most Popular

Calculus,

Calculus

In high school, I passed the Advanced Placement test for calculus. I took more advanced calculus courses in college. including graduate economics courses that involved calculus and engineering courses using calculus. I taught "Brief Calculus" several semesters, an abbreviated calculus course designed for business majors. I took a probability upper division course at the University of Arizona, which required calculus.
Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Prealgebra, Precalculus, Statistics

Other

Bible Studies,

Bible Studies

I have taken two semesters on the Bible, one on the Old Testament, one on the New. Both courses were taken from the chaplain at the VA Hospital in Tucson, Arizona. He also taught at Grand Canyon University and Pima Community College. He served in Iraq. I got A's in both courses. I have had other religion courses, about four, and other philosophy courses some related to religion, ten or more which discussed religion and the Bible. My personal background involves relatives and friends from an assortment of christian churches, Quakers, fundamentalist Baptists, Lutherans, Catholics, Seventh Day Adventists, Episcopalians, and Jehovah's Witnesses. My personal view is the real dispute is not so much literalism versus allegories, but what degree of literalism is used and where, for a particular interpretation or verse. Currently, I attend a church with a Bible study that has the Gospel of Thomas as the focus with related gospel passages. I feel comfortable with either a fundamentalist person, a "progressive" interpretation, or anywhere in between, whatever a student wants. That may sound a little indecisive or evasive, but I like a wide perspective, while realizing most people do center on a particular viewpoint. I could be supportive to anyone of faith in any particular Bible interpretation, such as Creationism or Bishop Spong's "Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism' which seems to be really Tillich's ground of being viewpoint. I have been surprised at how often Bible verses show up in secular places, such as on the UN building with an Isaiah quote, or Abraham Lincoln's united we stand. Obama publicly repeated Isaiah 9:10 at Ground Zero. Years ago I learned a little Hebrew, while attending a Jewish Temple. I think Hebrew helps in the Old Testament. Geography, history and culture are useful too. I do not feel I should impose my views, which are a little indecisive anyway, on anyone. But I try to stay knowledgeable about Bible topics and current events related to the Bible. In particular, I was surprised to see how the JEPD Torah theory is still widely presented as universally accepted, yet in the past 30 years, major criticisms and alternative theories have been advanced. Depending on your predisposition, you could use the criticism to argue Moses is the author, or to just have an alternative secular theory. I took a philosophy course from an instructor who presented JEPD as beyond dispute, as his father had been a pastor and learned it. The book of Daniel is interesting. I took a Western Civilization or world history course and paid close attention to the corresponding secular history. Bible scholars have changed their views over the years. I have read several C.S. Lewis books. Lewis is a literature expert, and the Bible as literature is another perspective. He has perhaps an Anglican fundamentalist Bible view. I have never taught a Sunday school class, probably because I would feel uncomfortable trying to comply with the church's particular objectives. In contrast, I would have no difficulty trying to give a particular individual or student the objective and viewpoint they wanted, even if it may not be near what I might be thinking, but also compare their view with what the text or course seems to be requiring. Bible viewpoints are in flux, including mine. I met a woman in a Bible study who believed in astrology. While I don't believe in astrology, I gave her verses that supported her viewpoint, the 3 wise men following a star, as astrologers, and Jesus saying look for the man carrying a water pitcher, which definitely sounds like Aquarius, following Pisces, the fish, symbol of Jesus, at least the acronym in Greek. I am familiar with Bible translations, three Catholic versions, Jehovah's Witnesses', George Lamsa's Aramaic, Living translation or paraphrasing, King James New King James, Revised Standard and numerous others. I have read "Science of God" by an MIT physicist, Gerald Schoeder, who looks at the Hebrew Old Testament. He translates 7 days of creation as corresponding to 13 billion years after an Einstein time translation. More liberal interpretations focus on allegories and the moral teaching. Conservatives look to a literal translation to support the moral teaching. I still clearly remember the senior pastor in my church, who had a doctorate in divinity while working on a 2nd doctorate, confuse Esther and Ruth, concerning which book never mentioned God. He said Ruth. I knew it was Esther and lovingly "corrected" him. Antony Flew, the former atheist now deist, has a book, There is a God, with an appendix on how the gospels and Jesus treat women. The surprise is Jesus treated women as equals, in contrast to the Jewish culture and era of the time, and in contrast to virtually any teachings of the time, such as Aristotle and Plato or neoplatonism, other religions or cultures.
Geography,

Geography

I have an interest in history, with about eight history courses completed. Each history course is virtually a geography course. History is about wars, and wars take place virtually everywhere on earth. That gives a geography background just knowing what happened, where and when. My father used to have maps all over his rooms. My favorite maps were linguistic, giving instead of national boundaries, colored areas where different languages were spoken. They tended to explain where the wars occurred as well. For example, Basque separatist movements involve a group with a unique language in Europe, unlike any other.
Government & Politics,

Government & Politics

I have been a Democrat, a Republican, a Libertarian, a Green and an independent. I can recite every American president, in order, but not all their wives. I have a J.D. in law and an associate's degree with highest honors in administration of justice studies. I have taken two political science courses, focusing on the constitution and government. I have two degrees in economics. Politics and government involve economics and money. I have taken six history courses. Much of history is politics and changing governments. I got involved in some local political campaigns. Low information voters decide elections, along with last minute personal attacks on the opponent. My academic degrees in law, economics, and philosophy are each a part of government and politics. I have taken about 15 philosophy courses, including philosophy of law, ethics and social values, and courses dealing with government, such as Plato's Republic. I have taken about 40 law courses, all dealing with some aspect of government. I have had possibly 40 economics course, all dealing with the major influence or objective of political figures, how to redistribute wealth or create wealth. We used to have merit selection for federal employees. Now we have more of the spoils system and reward for political loyalty. No one got fired over 9/11. No one got fired over Benghazi. Our system rewards loyalty over competence. But I am open to any political view, marxist to libertarian, or anything in between. We need more creative ideas and less ideological ideas. In the private sphere, what works makes money. In the political sphere what works gets less funding, and what does not work gets more funding, to keep it going.
Law,

Law

I have a J.D., or law degree. I also have an associate's degree in administration of justice studies. I have worked in law related fields for decades. I have taught legal writing in prisons, sponsored by local community colleges. I am also currently licensed to practice law in one state, although I am semi-retired.
Microeconomics,

Microeconomics

I have an M.A. and B.A., master's and bachelor's degrees in economics. I graduated from California State University with a 3.89 GPA for the master's degree. All economics courses were A's. I tutored in microeconomics last year. The student received an A. I especially understand microeconomics, as it, in my opinion, is more mathematical and logical. In particular, elasticities are more easily understood if you know calculus. I have taught microeconomics in community colleges for several years. I have taught macro, but I prefer micro.
Philosophy,

Philosophy

I have a bachelor's degree in philosophy from UCLA. I graduated cum laude. I have taught business ethics in a community college philosophy department in Mesa, Arizona. I also took about 7 more philosophy courses in the past couple years, planning to teach philosophy in one of these areas, including standard courses: logic, intro to philosophy, philosophy of religion; God, mind & matter, ethics and social values, philosophy of science. I also took an ancient philosophy course at the University of Arizona in 2010, on Plato and Aristotle. I received an A and perfect score on one test that the instructor used to illustrate to other students what he wanted for answers. Philosophy, in many ways, is like mathematics. Many of the classic mathematicians are also philosophers, and vice versa. I have a math background as well. Philosophy is possibly the only basic college academic field where discussion of religion and God are not only allowed but required. I have several religion courses as well, all A's.
Religion

Religion

I have a bachelor's degree from UCLA in philosophy. I graduated cum laude. The degree was a double major. The philosophy degree included course in philosophy of religion. I earned another recent associate's degree which included about 7 philosophy courses and 5 religion courses, including Asian religion, Old Testament, New Testament, philosophy of religion, and religion in popular culture. I attend a local Atlanta church, where the senior pastor has one doctor's degree in divinity and is working on a second doctorate. When he discusses the Bible, I sometimes correct him, which is probably impolite, but I couldn't help it. He got Esther and Ruth mixed up. They used Bishop Spong's book on fundamentalism which is out of date as to current JEPD theories. I knew more about George Lamsa's Aramaic Bible than he did, and he was taking graduate course in it. My Asian religion course covered Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism (or Taoism), Shintoism and Confucianism. I used to attend a synagogue and learned a little Hebrew. I also took a philosophy course, "Mind, Matter and God," with a community college professor, who just semi-retired. He told me he could use him as a reference if I wanted one. His name is Stu Barr, at Pima Community College, Tucson, Arizona. I took other religious courses from another philosophy professor at Pima Community College, Paul Lee. He would likely give a reference as well. He liked my two novel ontological arguments for the existence of God, similar to Anselm's. I took two other religion courses from the chaplain at the VA Hospital in Tucson. This was all in the past couple years. Going back much further, I took a philosophy of religion course from UCLA Professor Albritton, who probably retired years ago. He gave me an A. All religion courses were A's. The Asian religion course about a year or so ago, was taught by an instructor named Billings. I wrote a lengthy paper on the Falun Gong in China. It was so lengthy, closer to novel size, he would have to remember it. Falun Gong is a composite of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Traditional Chinese Medicine. I've visited endless churches, including the Nation of Islam, although they did watch white people very carefully. I keep an open mind, and focus on facts and history. I must have picked that up like my Asian instructor Billings, as he avoided giving his personal views at every step, unlike many other instructors.

Science

Philosophy

Philosophy

I have a bachelor's degree in philosophy from UCLA. I graduated cum laude. I have taught business ethics in a community college philosophy department in Mesa, Arizona. I also took about 7 more philosophy courses in the past couple years, planning to teach philosophy in one of these areas, including standard courses: logic, intro to philosophy, philosophy of religion; God, mind & matter, ethics and social values, philosophy of science. I also took an ancient philosophy course at the University of Arizona in 2010, on Plato and Aristotle. I received an A and perfect score on one test that the instructor used to illustrate to other students what he wanted for answers. Philosophy, in many ways, is like mathematics. Many of the classic mathematicians are also philosophers, and vice versa. I have a math background as well. Philosophy is possibly the only basic college academic field where discussion of religion and God are not only allowed but required. I have several religion courses as well, all A's.

Summer

Calculus,

Calculus

In high school, I passed the Advanced Placement test for calculus. I took more advanced calculus courses in college. including graduate economics courses that involved calculus and engineering courses using calculus. I taught "Brief Calculus" several semesters, an abbreviated calculus course designed for business majors. I took a probability upper division course at the University of Arizona, which required calculus.
Microeconomics,

Microeconomics

I have an M.A. and B.A., master's and bachelor's degrees in economics. I graduated from California State University with a 3.89 GPA for the master's degree. All economics courses were A's. I tutored in microeconomics last year. The student received an A. I especially understand microeconomics, as it, in my opinion, is more mathematical and logical. In particular, elasticities are more easily understood if you know calculus. I have taught microeconomics in community colleges for several years. I have taught macro, but I prefer micro.
Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, SAT Math, Statistics

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Raymond B.

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