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Aric F.

Stanford-educated Active-Learning Tutor for Math, Spanish, SAT + More

Stanford-educated Active-Learning Tutor for Math, Spanish, SAT + More

$75/hour

  • 158 hours tutoring

  • Studio City, CA 91604

About Aric


Bio

Hi there! Though currently living and working in Southern California, I am an undergraduate at Stanford University pursuing a B.S. in Physics and a B.A. Philosophy. These disciplines may seem unrelated, but I am attracted to both for largely the same reason, indeed the same reason that I am passionate about tutoring: I have always been fascinated by the basic building blocks of knowledge. Even when studying less abstract topics like Biology, History, and Economics - which happen to be some of...

Hi there! Though currently living and working in Southern California, I am an undergraduate at Stanford University pursuing a B.S. in Physics and a B.A. Philosophy. These disciplines may seem unrelated, but I am attracted to both for largely the same reason, indeed the same reason that I am passionate about tutoring: I have always been fascinated by the basic building blocks of knowledge. Even when studying less abstract topics like Biology, History, and Economics - which happen to be some of my favorite to tutor - I find that asking "Why?" and "How?" often leads me back to the fundamental laws of nature and of life. This ground-up approach to understanding has propelled my career as both a learner and an educator, and is just one of the ways that my journey as a student informs my methods as a tutor.

My personal tutoring experience spans a variety of settings, including a combined three years of work for both Hawken School and Stanford as an official Math, Science, Spanish and English peer tutor, as well as one year volunteering with Esperanza, Inc., a non-profit dedicated to supporting underprivileged youth during the college application process. I also co-created and taught the Logic & Rhetoric curriculum at the Champion Briefs Institute, an award-winning speech and debate summer intensive. Each of these organizations emphasizes the unique role of the tutor as both teacher and peer, a philosophy that has also defined my four years of private tutoring. In fact, my ability to relate to clients as a fellow active student - one only a few years removed from negotiating standardized tests and the seven-hour school day myself - has proved to be one of my most valuable assets as a teacher. Often, I find that tutoring is as much about unlearning bad habits and correcting misconceptions as it is developing effective study tools. Thinking like a student, then, and anticipating when and why one might go astray becomes just as important as thinking like an educator and illuminating the best path forward.

A successful academic journey, I believe, begins with a relationship. My priority is always to foster a trusting environment in which students feel comfortable asking questions, expressing frustrations, and challenging themselves. Beyond that initial goal - in fact because of it - my approach varies widely from tutee to tutee based on personal objectives and needs, which I continually assess based on feedback from students as well as their teachers and guardians. For some students, building a solid foundation of time management and organizational skills is our first and most crucial step. For others, it is learning to breakdown complex problems and tasks into simpler components.

Regardless of the individual, however, one key aspect of my process remains constant: I believe in active learning. Whenever possible, I avoid merely teaching definitions and formulas, instead focusing on the development of critical thinking skills that students can use to make connections and solve problems for themselves. In practice, this means that the lesson plans I create for each session usually begin with an active review, in which I guide students through a series of customized questions designed to deepen their understanding in the areas with which they most need help. From there, my students take the lead as we work through any assignments or study guides they may have, pausing along the way to clarify concepts and address questions as they organically arise. When rote memorization is unavoidable, I make ample use of mnemonics and extended, personally meaningful examples to ensure that students fully grasp the necessary content.

My ultimate goal as a tutor is to make myself obsolete, equipping each of my students with the tools they need to tackle new material and derive knowledge on their own. If you think my approach could be helpful in your preparations for the SAT, the ACT, or a course in any of my listed subjects, please feel free to contact me; I would be happy to answer any questions you may have or to schedule a free consultation and discuss my potential role in the many options available to you. I look forward to helping you maximize your scholarly potential.


Education

B.A. Stanford University (in progress)
Physics

Policies

  • Hourly rate: $75
  • Rate details: For group lessons, I take 25% off for each added student (so 2 students pay $45/hr per student, 3 students pay $33.75/hr per student, etc.)
  • Tutor’s lessons: In-person
  • Travel policy: Within 25 miles of Studio City, CA 91604
  • Lesson cancellation: 12 hours notice required
  • Background check passed on 5/27/2017

  • Your first lesson is backed by our Good Fit Guarantee

Schedule

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Subjects

Business

Public Speaking

Public Speaking

As a competitor on and then captain of my high school debate team, I was twice the OHSSL State Runner-up in Lincoln-Douglas debate and the 2014 National Runner-up in Impromptu Speaking. After graduating, I helped develop the public speaking and rhetoric curriculum for both the Champion Briefs Institute, where I worked as a summer intensive instructor, and the inaugural season of National Speech & Debate Association webinars. I am also a professional actor and member of the Screen Actors Guild, and so have extensive training in vocal technique, stage presence and emotive skills. When tutoring in public speaking, my first priority is always to create a lighthearted atmosphere - often through fun physical and vocal warm-ups - in which students feel comfortable experimenting and making mistakes. From there, I seek to provide well-rounded instruction that, depending on the individual student's needs, usually draws heavily from both the technical skills of argument that are central to forensics and performative techniques that can be applied from the theatrical world.

Corporate Training

Public Speaking,

Public Speaking

As a competitor on and then captain of my high school debate team, I was twice the OHSSL State Runner-up in Lincoln-Douglas debate and the 2014 National Runner-up in Impromptu Speaking. After graduating, I helped develop the public speaking and rhetoric curriculum for both the Champion Briefs Institute, where I worked as a summer intensive instructor, and the inaugural season of National Speech & Debate Association webinars. I am also a professional actor and member of the Screen Actors Guild, and so have extensive training in vocal technique, stage presence and emotive skills. When tutoring in public speaking, my first priority is always to create a lighthearted atmosphere - often through fun physical and vocal warm-ups - in which students feel comfortable experimenting and making mistakes. From there, I seek to provide well-rounded instruction that, depending on the individual student's needs, usually draws heavily from both the technical skills of argument that are central to forensics and performative techniques that can be applied from the theatrical world.
Spanish,

Spanish

I am an undergraduate at Stanford University, where I also work as an official peer tutor for the Spanish department. Though I have been speaking Spanish since age five and am a DELE Level C2 (fluent) speaker, Spanish is not one of my native languages, so I have first-hand experience with the way it is taught in high school classrooms and the areas in which confusion can often arise. So, after first carefully assessing the topics with which students most need help, I design custom active-learning lesson plans for each session that include both written and verbal exercises. Whenever possible, I avoid rote memorization of vocabulary and grammar rules, instead trying to organically integrate this knowledge into repetitive practice so that they are eventually second-nature. By using personally meaningful examples and supplementing in-person sessions with recommended listening, reading and online practice on platforms like StudySpanish, I have been able to rapidly increase interest and fluency in Spanish for students at a wide variety of levels. I would love to help you do the same!
Grammar, Proofreading, Statistics

Elementary Education

Elementary Math,

Elementary Math

Though it can seem like the simplest of subjects, I take the most care with - and get the most gratification from - tutoring elementary math, for the simple reason that it can make or break the foundation for a student's educational future. The importance of laying this foundation deliberately and specifically cannot be overstated; because students at this level are still developing their basic learning skills and intuition about the world, I believe an effective lesson must be customized around their own learning style and speed, as well as their personal interests. My own approach does this by focusing an active-learning rather than lecturing. For each session, I create a set of personally-relevant problems and extended examples that build upon each other to introduce and flesh out a particular topics, letting the student take the lead in working through them and making connections. My role is much more to ask leading questions than give answers, stepping in to clarify misconceptions or explain ideas only when needed so that students are not unnecessarily confused by explanations that do not apply to their own ways of thinking. This "organic" approach allows me to observe how a student naturally approaches problem solving, so that each subsequent lesson can be further tailored to their own habits and needs. If done right, I firmly believe that the confusion so often prevalent in a math classroom setting can be entirely avoided, and that any student can develop the confidence and skill to recognize and solve the simple steps involved in elementary problems.
Elementary Science, Grammar, Reading, Spelling, Vocabulary

English

ACT English,

ACT English

The ACT English section is specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. I always supplement these in-person sessions with assignments that can be completed individually so that growth can be steadily maintained up until test day. More often than not, confusion arises in the ACT English section not because students cannot find what they think is a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the English section with confidence.
ACT Reading,

ACT Reading

The ACT Reading section is specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on reading comprehension - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. I always supplement these in-person sessions with assignments that can be completed individually so that growth can be steadily maintained up until test day. More often than not, confusion arises in the ACT Reading section not because students cannot find what they think is a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the English section with confidence.
Public Speaking,

Public Speaking

As a competitor on and then captain of my high school debate team, I was twice the OHSSL State Runner-up in Lincoln-Douglas debate and the 2014 National Runner-up in Impromptu Speaking. After graduating, I helped develop the public speaking and rhetoric curriculum for both the Champion Briefs Institute, where I worked as a summer intensive instructor, and the inaugural season of National Speech & Debate Association webinars. I am also a professional actor and member of the Screen Actors Guild, and so have extensive training in vocal technique, stage presence and emotive skills. When tutoring in public speaking, my first priority is always to create a lighthearted atmosphere - often through fun physical and vocal warm-ups - in which students feel comfortable experimenting and making mistakes. From there, I seek to provide well-rounded instruction that, depending on the individual student's needs, usually draws heavily from both the technical skills of argument that are central to forensics and performative techniques that can be applied from the theatrical world.
SAT Reading,

SAT Reading

The new SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section was specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. More often than not, confusion arises on SAT Reading and Writing questions not because students cannot find a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the Reading and Writing section.
SAT Writing,

SAT Writing

The new SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section was specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. I always supplement these in-person sessions with assignments that can be completed individually so that growth can be steadily maintained up until test day. More often than not, confusion arises on SAT Reading and Writing questions not because students cannot find a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the Reading and Writing section.
Writing,

Writing

In my four years of tutoring English both privately and on staff at the Hawken School Writing Center, I have discovered first-hand that one of the best ways to improve one's own writing is to edit that of others. All writers grow attached to their own work, which can make offering it up for criticism - especially self-criticism - a difficult and daunting task, but examining texts written by others allows students to focus on the mechanics of writing, unhindered by the emotions and intentions attached to their own work. For this reason, I use a "ground-up" approach to teaching writing, starting with simple exercises that teach students to identify and then use the building blocks of language (word choice, conciseness, and structure, for example). With these fundamentals firmly established, we can apply them to tackling larger writing assignments - ideally focused on topics that are personally relevant and interesting to each student - and developing the nuances that separate good writing from great. While math, science and even history are governed by laws and certain objective truths, the ability to write well can often feel like an intangible talent that must be given rather than taught. That idea, that the right words simply come to some people and not to others, is what can make the blinking cursor so intimidating and writers block so common. My priority is to create an environment in which students feel comfortable pushing themselves and making mistakes. In fact, for larger writing assignments, I actively encourage the technique of "free writing" to get students in the habit of simply jotting down ideas that can later be refined in the drafting and editing process. With a careful, customized practiced and a systematic approach, I firmly believe the vague idea of "good writing" can be demystified and deconstructed, and that any student can learn to master the English language.
English, Grammar, Proofreading, Reading, Spelling, Vocabulary

History

American History, European History, Geography, Philosophy, World History

Homeschool

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring Algebra I in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra I and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have more experience tutoring Algebra 2 than any other subject, having done so as an official peer tutor for both Hawken Upper School and Stanford University, as well as in four years of private math coaching and one year on staff at the non-profit Esperanza, Inc. Though I make a point of tailoring my approach to the individual needs and learning styles of each student, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is usually to keep problem-solving as the central focus. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical and interactive learning tools such as Desmos®, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra 2 and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Calculus,

Calculus

The leap from precalculus to calculus is perhaps the most daunting in the life of most math students, but it is also a golden opportunity to lay a robust academic foundation for nearly every scientific field. In fact, it can easily be argued that calculus is what makes math useful for real life, and because it is so intimately related to the world we live in every day the principles of calculus can actually be grasped rather intuitively if properly taught. My priority when teaching calculus is always to foster that intuition, making sure that students do not focus on simply memorizing formulas and techniques but on developing the knowledge they need to fully understand and derive them for themselves. Though I make a point of adapting my methods to each individual student's learning style, accomplishing this almost always involves an active-learning approach, in which I design a custom set of problems and extended examples for each lesson that are personally-relevant to the student and that build upon each other to introduce and elaborate on concepts. My sessions are therefore highly student-driven - my role is much less about answering questions as it is asking them, guiding students to make connections and draw conclusions for themselves while stepping in to clarify concepts and misconceptions as they arise organically. This focus on problem-solving can also be adapted to work through a student's own homework assignments if they feel more comfortable completing them in-session than on their own. In either case, I make sure to constantly relate the techniques used in an individual problem back to the core concepts of calculus (namely derivatives, integrals and the idea of infinitesimals) so that working through questions is not merely a rote task, but a contribution to and reinforcement of a fundamental understanding of calculus and its applications.
Chemistry,

Chemistry

I have studied chemistry in almost every conceivable context: I completed a traditional high school Honors Chemistry course, then independently-studied for the SAT Chemistry Subject Test and AP Chemistry Exams (on which I was able to attain perfect scores of 800 and 5, respectively), and am now studying physical chemistry at Stanford University. I also conducted chemical engineering research on nanoparticles at Case Western Reserve University, for which I won 4th-place in Chemistry at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This diversity of experiences has familiarized me not just with a variety of chemistry topics, but with various teaching styles as well, and a pride myself on adapting my methods based on continued feedback from students, parents, guardians and teachers about what works best with their particular learning style. A few things about my approach remain constant however. Whenever possible, I use a "flipped-classroom" active-learning model, in which I end each session by briefly introducing a new topic and then leaving students with a video - sometimes one from a free online resource such as Khan Academy or Crash Course, but often one specifically created for that student by me - that more fully explains it. Our in-person time, then, can be spent on assignments or customized sets of personally-relevant problems that I create for each session, pausing as we work through them together to clarify misconceptions and elaborate on ideas as they arise organically. Chemistry is fundamentally a problem-solving discipline, and in my experience this emphasis on critical reasoning rather than memorization can profoundly increase interest in and mastery of chemical concepts in just a few sessions.
Geometry,

Geometry

I have been tutoring geometry for a longer period of time than any other subject, beginning with becoming an official peer tutor while completing Honors Geometry as a freshman in high school. I am highly familiar, therefore, with both how geometry is taught in schools and the areas in which confusion often arises, which are often best clarified through guided 1-on-1 instruction. Being a highly visual topic, geometry is best understood I find through active problem-solving and diagram-drawing, so the lesson plans I design are always centered around guiding students through a custom sequence of problems that systematically explain and expand upon a given topic. I also make use of online tools such as Desmos with which students can build and play with geometric constructions and develop a very intuitive grasp of how they change and relate to one another.
Physics,

Physics

Though it is often feared as the most "mathy" of the sciences, the mathematical roots of physics make it possible to master without memorizing terms or even learning to use lab equipment. In fact, at an introductory level, physics is little more than applied algebra, and can be just as simple with a little guidance on how to set-up and solve equations as they relate to real-world phenomena. My teaching method, inspired by my own national-renowned high school physics teacher Robert Shurtz, focuses on just that: a systematic method of translating real-world problems into a list of known and unknown variables, and then selecting, setting-up and solving an appropriate equation that relates those variables. The active-learning lesson plans that I design for every session are customized for each student, sequentially applying this method to a series of problems that build upon each other to illuminate the specific concepts with which they most need help. Once fully understood, this basic method can be used to solve the vast majority of physics problems a student will encounter. Personally, it allowed me to become one of 400 national semi-finalist for the U.S. Physics Team, an experience that changed my life as a student and educator, and I would love to help you use it to achieve your goals in physics, whatever they may be.
Piano,

Piano

With four music-related degrees between my two parents and only sibling, the household in which I grew up lived and breathed music. I personally began my formal classical training at age four in the Preparatory Division at the prestigious Cleveland Institute of Music, where I studied music theory, composition, Dalcroze Eurhythmics, and the complete Suzuki piano curriculum in addition to receiving traditional piano instruction. This well-rounded music education, further supplemented when I began studying and performing jazz piano at age twelve, informs my holistic approach to tutoring piano. I teach all of my beginning students in accordance with the Simply Music Piano Method, which - like the Orff Schulwerk, the Kodály Method and other widely-accepted pedagogical techniques - is a "playing-based" approach that seeks to create an immersive environment for music-learning mirroring the one in which human beings naturally acquire language. Technical knowledge of notation and theory is introduced only after students have learned to play, sing and move their bodies to music. Though my experience in one-on-one piano instruction is mostly limited to children between the ages of 4 and 12, I am also qualified to teach intermediate and advanced repertoire, having competed at a national level in both jazz and classical piano.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring prealgebra both in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation for studying algebra and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

As the bridge from algebra to the study of calculus, and therefore the foundation of advanced study in any of the maths and sciences, precalculus is one of the most important subjects in the student's math career. Unfortunately, because it often covers a wide variety of seemingly disjointed topics, it can also be one of the most difficult to master. My teaching methods focuses on simplifying this wide-variety of topics into a few core skills that, once mastered, can be applied to solve a range of problems using systematic critical thinking. I design each lesson plan around a custom set of questions and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student, and that incrementally build on each other to develop a full understanding of the given topic. My role is a tutor, then, is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting the student take the lead as they work through these problems and make connections for themselves while stepping in to clarify misconceptions as they arise organically. This active-learning approach, coupled with occasional use of mnemonics and tips for learning the few concepts that should actually be memorized, equips each of my students with a robust problem-solving ability and a strong foundation for their future studies.
SAT Math,

SAT Math

Compared both to other standardized tests like the ACT Math section and to typical math tests from a high school course, the SAT Math section tests the ability to quickly recognize basic concepts and avoid common errors much more than complex problem-solving. Though this can seem daunting, it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to properly prepare for the exam, because it means test-takers will encounter a very finite set of question types. By learning to see each of these questions "inside-out" like a test-writer, identifying not just what the question is asking but what concept it is testing, students can learn to recognize and avoid the most common traps and pitfalls, and from there perform the simple computations needed to arrive at the correct answer efficiently. My teaching method for the SAT Math section is specifically built to develop this skill quickly. A typical session will begin with a quick content review of a mathematical concept such as logarithms or geometric problem-solving, but the majority of each lesson is dedicated to applying that content to various SAT question types, emphasizing how critical thinking can be used to "see through" the question and rapidly identify the correct multiple-choice answer. By test day, students will be armed with: helpful mnemonics and tips for the few mathematical concepts that should actually be memorized; strategies for relieving testing anxiety; knowledge of how to get the most out of their calculator; and, most importantly, extensive problem-solving practice. For each of my past students, all of that has added up to a formula for confidence and success.
SAT Reading,

SAT Reading

The new SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section was specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. More often than not, confusion arises on SAT Reading and Writing questions not because students cannot find a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the Reading and Writing section.
Spanish,

Spanish

I am an undergraduate at Stanford University, where I also work as an official peer tutor for the Spanish department. Though I have been speaking Spanish since age five and am a DELE Level C2 (fluent) speaker, Spanish is not one of my native languages, so I have first-hand experience with the way it is taught in high school classrooms and the areas in which confusion can often arise. So, after first carefully assessing the topics with which students most need help, I design custom active-learning lesson plans for each session that include both written and verbal exercises. Whenever possible, I avoid rote memorization of vocabulary and grammar rules, instead trying to organically integrate this knowledge into repetitive practice so that they are eventually second-nature. By using personally meaningful examples and supplementing in-person sessions with recommended listening, reading and online practice on platforms like StudySpanish, I have been able to rapidly increase interest and fluency in Spanish for students at a wide variety of levels. I would love to help you do the same!
Writing,

Writing

In my four years of tutoring English both privately and on staff at the Hawken School Writing Center, I have discovered first-hand that one of the best ways to improve one's own writing is to edit that of others. All writers grow attached to their own work, which can make offering it up for criticism - especially self-criticism - a difficult and daunting task, but examining texts written by others allows students to focus on the mechanics of writing, unhindered by the emotions and intentions attached to their own work. For this reason, I use a "ground-up" approach to teaching writing, starting with simple exercises that teach students to identify and then use the building blocks of language (word choice, conciseness, and structure, for example). With these fundamentals firmly established, we can apply them to tackling larger writing assignments - ideally focused on topics that are personally relevant and interesting to each student - and developing the nuances that separate good writing from great. While math, science and even history are governed by laws and certain objective truths, the ability to write well can often feel like an intangible talent that must be given rather than taught. That idea, that the right words simply come to some people and not to others, is what can make the blinking cursor so intimidating and writers block so common. My priority is to create an environment in which students feel comfortable pushing themselves and making mistakes. In fact, for larger writing assignments, I actively encourage the technique of "free writing" to get students in the habit of simply jotting down ideas that can later be refined in the drafting and editing process. With a careful, customized practiced and a systematic approach, I firmly believe the vague idea of "good writing" can be demystified and deconstructed, and that any student can learn to master the English language.
Biology, English, Reading, Spelling, Statistics

Language

Spanish

Spanish

I am an undergraduate at Stanford University, where I also work as an official peer tutor for the Spanish department. Though I have been speaking Spanish since age five and am a DELE Level C2 (fluent) speaker, Spanish is not one of my native languages, so I have first-hand experience with the way it is taught in high school classrooms and the areas in which confusion can often arise. So, after first carefully assessing the topics with which students most need help, I design custom active-learning lesson plans for each session that include both written and verbal exercises. Whenever possible, I avoid rote memorization of vocabulary and grammar rules, instead trying to organically integrate this knowledge into repetitive practice so that they are eventually second-nature. By using personally meaningful examples and supplementing in-person sessions with recommended listening, reading and online practice on platforms like StudySpanish, I have been able to rapidly increase interest and fluency in Spanish for students at a wide variety of levels. I would love to help you do the same!

Math

ACT Math,

ACT Math

Compared both to other standardized tests like the SAT Math section and to regular math tests that a student is likely to encounter during the high school year, the ACT Math section is a fast-paced exam that emphasizes quick recognition of concepts much more than complex problem-solving ability. Though this can seem daunting, it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to properly prepare for the exam, because it means test-takers will encounter a much more limited set of question types. By learning to see each of these questions "inside-out", identifying not just what the question is asking but what concept it is testing, students can learn to recognize and avoid the traps and pitfalls that test-makers often design, and from there perform the simple computations needed to arrive at the correct answer efficiently. My teaching method for the ACT Math section is specifically built to develop this skill quickly. A typical session will begin with a quick content review of a mathematical concept such as logarithms or geometric problem-solving, but the majority of each lesson is dedicated to applying that content to various ACT question types, emphasizing how critical thinking can be used to "see through" the question and rapidly identify the correct multiple-choice answer. By test day, students will be armed with: helpful mnemonics and tips for the few mathematical concepts that should actually be memorized; strategies for relieving testing anxiety; knowledge of how to get the most out of their calculator; and, most importantly, extensive problem-solving practice. For each of my past students, all of that has added up to a formula for confidence and success.
Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring Algebra I in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra I and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have more experience tutoring Algebra 2 than any other subject, having done so as an official peer tutor for both Hawken Upper School and Stanford University, as well as in four years of private math coaching and one year on staff at the non-profit Esperanza, Inc. Though I make a point of tailoring my approach to the individual needs and learning styles of each student, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is usually to keep problem-solving as the central focus. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical and interactive learning tools such as Desmos®, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra 2 and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Calculus,

Calculus

The leap from precalculus to calculus is perhaps the most daunting in the life of most math students, but it is also a golden opportunity to lay a robust academic foundation for nearly every scientific field. In fact, it can easily be argued that calculus is what makes math useful for real life, and because it is so intimately related to the world we live in every day the principles of calculus can actually be grasped rather intuitively if properly taught. My priority when teaching calculus is always to foster that intuition, making sure that students do not focus on simply memorizing formulas and techniques but on developing the knowledge they need to fully understand and derive them for themselves. Though I make a point of adapting my methods to each individual student's learning style, accomplishing this almost always involves an active-learning approach, in which I design a custom set of problems and extended examples for each lesson that are personally-relevant to the student and that build upon each other to introduce and elaborate on concepts. My sessions are therefore highly student-driven - my role is much less about answering questions as it is asking them, guiding students to make connections and draw conclusions for themselves while stepping in to clarify concepts and misconceptions as they arise organically. This focus on problem-solving can also be adapted to work through a student's own homework assignments if they feel more comfortable completing them in-session than on their own. In either case, I make sure to constantly relate the techniques used in an individual problem back to the core concepts of calculus (namely derivatives, integrals and the idea of infinitesimals) so that working through questions is not merely a rote task, but a contribution to and reinforcement of a fundamental understanding of calculus and its applications.
Geometry,

Geometry

I have been tutoring geometry for a longer period of time than any other subject, beginning with becoming an official peer tutor while completing Honors Geometry as a freshman in high school. I am highly familiar, therefore, with both how geometry is taught in schools and the areas in which confusion often arises, which are often best clarified through guided 1-on-1 instruction. Being a highly visual topic, geometry is best understood I find through active problem-solving and diagram-drawing, so the lesson plans I design are always centered around guiding students through a custom sequence of problems that systematically explain and expand upon a given topic. I also make use of online tools such as Desmos with which students can build and play with geometric constructions and develop a very intuitive grasp of how they change and relate to one another.
Physics,

Physics

Though it is often feared as the most "mathy" of the sciences, the mathematical roots of physics make it possible to master without memorizing terms or even learning to use lab equipment. In fact, at an introductory level, physics is little more than applied algebra, and can be just as simple with a little guidance on how to set-up and solve equations as they relate to real-world phenomena. My teaching method, inspired by my own national-renowned high school physics teacher Robert Shurtz, focuses on just that: a systematic method of translating real-world problems into a list of known and unknown variables, and then selecting, setting-up and solving an appropriate equation that relates those variables. The active-learning lesson plans that I design for every session are customized for each student, sequentially applying this method to a series of problems that build upon each other to illuminate the specific concepts with which they most need help. Once fully understood, this basic method can be used to solve the vast majority of physics problems a student will encounter. Personally, it allowed me to become one of 400 national semi-finalist for the U.S. Physics Team, an experience that changed my life as a student and educator, and I would love to help you use it to achieve your goals in physics, whatever they may be.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring prealgebra both in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation for studying algebra and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

As the bridge from algebra to the study of calculus, and therefore the foundation of advanced study in any of the maths and sciences, precalculus is one of the most important subjects in the student's math career. Unfortunately, because it often covers a wide variety of seemingly disjointed topics, it can also be one of the most difficult to master. My teaching methods focuses on simplifying this wide-variety of topics into a few core skills that, once mastered, can be applied to solve a range of problems using systematic critical thinking. I design each lesson plan around a custom set of questions and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student, and that incrementally build on each other to develop a full understanding of the given topic. My role is a tutor, then, is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting the student take the lead as they work through these problems and make connections for themselves while stepping in to clarify misconceptions as they arise organically. This active-learning approach, coupled with occasional use of mnemonics and tips for learning the few concepts that should actually be memorized, equips each of my students with a robust problem-solving ability and a strong foundation for their future studies.
SAT Math,

SAT Math

Compared both to other standardized tests like the ACT Math section and to typical math tests from a high school course, the SAT Math section tests the ability to quickly recognize basic concepts and avoid common errors much more than complex problem-solving. Though this can seem daunting, it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to properly prepare for the exam, because it means test-takers will encounter a very finite set of question types. By learning to see each of these questions "inside-out" like a test-writer, identifying not just what the question is asking but what concept it is testing, students can learn to recognize and avoid the most common traps and pitfalls, and from there perform the simple computations needed to arrive at the correct answer efficiently. My teaching method for the SAT Math section is specifically built to develop this skill quickly. A typical session will begin with a quick content review of a mathematical concept such as logarithms or geometric problem-solving, but the majority of each lesson is dedicated to applying that content to various SAT question types, emphasizing how critical thinking can be used to "see through" the question and rapidly identify the correct multiple-choice answer. By test day, students will be armed with: helpful mnemonics and tips for the few mathematical concepts that should actually be memorized; strategies for relieving testing anxiety; knowledge of how to get the most out of their calculator; and, most importantly, extensive problem-solving practice. For each of my past students, all of that has added up to a formula for confidence and success.
Trigonometry,

Trigonometry

I have worked as a math office peer tutor for both Hawken Upper School and Stanford University, and have more experience tutoring trigonometry and its precalculus applications than virtually any other subject. In that time, I have found that trigonometry is often confusing for students simply because of their approach; the subject is often taught as a series of isolated formulas and equations to be remembered and used for specific problems, without tying these disparate concepts together in a unified conceptual framework. I deliberately try to do the opposite, using highly visual methods to develop a solid foundational understanding of trigonometry's geometric roots that can then be built on to solve a variety of problems using critical thinking skills alone, eliminating the need to memorize formulas without context. I use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of visual and interactive learning tools such as Desmos®, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in trigonometry and the confidence needed to apply it to more advanced topics in math and science.
Probability, Statistics

Most Popular

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring Algebra I in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra I and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have more experience tutoring Algebra 2 than any other subject, having done so as an official peer tutor for both Hawken Upper School and Stanford University, as well as in four years of private math coaching and one year on staff at the non-profit Esperanza, Inc. Though I make a point of tailoring my approach to the individual needs and learning styles of each student, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is usually to keep problem-solving as the central focus. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical and interactive learning tools such as Desmos®, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra 2 and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Calculus,

Calculus

The leap from precalculus to calculus is perhaps the most daunting in the life of most math students, but it is also a golden opportunity to lay a robust academic foundation for nearly every scientific field. In fact, it can easily be argued that calculus is what makes math useful for real life, and because it is so intimately related to the world we live in every day the principles of calculus can actually be grasped rather intuitively if properly taught. My priority when teaching calculus is always to foster that intuition, making sure that students do not focus on simply memorizing formulas and techniques but on developing the knowledge they need to fully understand and derive them for themselves. Though I make a point of adapting my methods to each individual student's learning style, accomplishing this almost always involves an active-learning approach, in which I design a custom set of problems and extended examples for each lesson that are personally-relevant to the student and that build upon each other to introduce and elaborate on concepts. My sessions are therefore highly student-driven - my role is much less about answering questions as it is asking them, guiding students to make connections and draw conclusions for themselves while stepping in to clarify concepts and misconceptions as they arise organically. This focus on problem-solving can also be adapted to work through a student's own homework assignments if they feel more comfortable completing them in-session than on their own. In either case, I make sure to constantly relate the techniques used in an individual problem back to the core concepts of calculus (namely derivatives, integrals and the idea of infinitesimals) so that working through questions is not merely a rote task, but a contribution to and reinforcement of a fundamental understanding of calculus and its applications.
Chemistry,

Chemistry

I have studied chemistry in almost every conceivable context: I completed a traditional high school Honors Chemistry course, then independently-studied for the SAT Chemistry Subject Test and AP Chemistry Exams (on which I was able to attain perfect scores of 800 and 5, respectively), and am now studying physical chemistry at Stanford University. I also conducted chemical engineering research on nanoparticles at Case Western Reserve University, for which I won 4th-place in Chemistry at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This diversity of experiences has familiarized me not just with a variety of chemistry topics, but with various teaching styles as well, and a pride myself on adapting my methods based on continued feedback from students, parents, guardians and teachers about what works best with their particular learning style. A few things about my approach remain constant however. Whenever possible, I use a "flipped-classroom" active-learning model, in which I end each session by briefly introducing a new topic and then leaving students with a video - sometimes one from a free online resource such as Khan Academy or Crash Course, but often one specifically created for that student by me - that more fully explains it. Our in-person time, then, can be spent on assignments or customized sets of personally-relevant problems that I create for each session, pausing as we work through them together to clarify misconceptions and elaborate on ideas as they arise organically. Chemistry is fundamentally a problem-solving discipline, and in my experience this emphasis on critical reasoning rather than memorization can profoundly increase interest in and mastery of chemical concepts in just a few sessions.
Geometry,

Geometry

I have been tutoring geometry for a longer period of time than any other subject, beginning with becoming an official peer tutor while completing Honors Geometry as a freshman in high school. I am highly familiar, therefore, with both how geometry is taught in schools and the areas in which confusion often arises, which are often best clarified through guided 1-on-1 instruction. Being a highly visual topic, geometry is best understood I find through active problem-solving and diagram-drawing, so the lesson plans I design are always centered around guiding students through a custom sequence of problems that systematically explain and expand upon a given topic. I also make use of online tools such as Desmos with which students can build and play with geometric constructions and develop a very intuitive grasp of how they change and relate to one another.
Physics,

Physics

Though it is often feared as the most "mathy" of the sciences, the mathematical roots of physics make it possible to master without memorizing terms or even learning to use lab equipment. In fact, at an introductory level, physics is little more than applied algebra, and can be just as simple with a little guidance on how to set-up and solve equations as they relate to real-world phenomena. My teaching method, inspired by my own national-renowned high school physics teacher Robert Shurtz, focuses on just that: a systematic method of translating real-world problems into a list of known and unknown variables, and then selecting, setting-up and solving an appropriate equation that relates those variables. The active-learning lesson plans that I design for every session are customized for each student, sequentially applying this method to a series of problems that build upon each other to illuminate the specific concepts with which they most need help. Once fully understood, this basic method can be used to solve the vast majority of physics problems a student will encounter. Personally, it allowed me to become one of 400 national semi-finalist for the U.S. Physics Team, an experience that changed my life as a student and educator, and I would love to help you use it to achieve your goals in physics, whatever they may be.
Piano,

Piano

With four music-related degrees between my two parents and only sibling, the household in which I grew up lived and breathed music. I personally began my formal classical training at age four in the Preparatory Division at the prestigious Cleveland Institute of Music, where I studied music theory, composition, Dalcroze Eurhythmics, and the complete Suzuki piano curriculum in addition to receiving traditional piano instruction. This well-rounded music education, further supplemented when I began studying and performing jazz piano at age twelve, informs my holistic approach to tutoring piano. I teach all of my beginning students in accordance with the Simply Music Piano Method, which - like the Orff Schulwerk, the Kodály Method and other widely-accepted pedagogical techniques - is a "playing-based" approach that seeks to create an immersive environment for music-learning mirroring the one in which human beings naturally acquire language. Technical knowledge of notation and theory is introduced only after students have learned to play, sing and move their bodies to music. Though my experience in one-on-one piano instruction is mostly limited to children between the ages of 4 and 12, I am also qualified to teach intermediate and advanced repertoire, having competed at a national level in both jazz and classical piano.
Prealgebra,

Prealgebra

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring prealgebra both in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation for studying algebra and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Precalculus,

Precalculus

As the bridge from algebra to the study of calculus, and therefore the foundation of advanced study in any of the maths and sciences, precalculus is one of the most important subjects in the student's math career. Unfortunately, because it often covers a wide variety of seemingly disjointed topics, it can also be one of the most difficult to master. My teaching methods focuses on simplifying this wide-variety of topics into a few core skills that, once mastered, can be applied to solve a range of problems using systematic critical thinking. I design each lesson plan around a custom set of questions and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student, and that incrementally build on each other to develop a full understanding of the given topic. My role is a tutor, then, is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting the student take the lead as they work through these problems and make connections for themselves while stepping in to clarify misconceptions as they arise organically. This active-learning approach, coupled with occasional use of mnemonics and tips for learning the few concepts that should actually be memorized, equips each of my students with a robust problem-solving ability and a strong foundation for their future studies.
Spanish,

Spanish

I am an undergraduate at Stanford University, where I also work as an official peer tutor for the Spanish department. Though I have been speaking Spanish since age five and am a DELE Level C2 (fluent) speaker, Spanish is not one of my native languages, so I have first-hand experience with the way it is taught in high school classrooms and the areas in which confusion can often arise. So, after first carefully assessing the topics with which students most need help, I design custom active-learning lesson plans for each session that include both written and verbal exercises. Whenever possible, I avoid rote memorization of vocabulary and grammar rules, instead trying to organically integrate this knowledge into repetitive practice so that they are eventually second-nature. By using personally meaningful examples and supplementing in-person sessions with recommended listening, reading and online practice on platforms like StudySpanish, I have been able to rapidly increase interest and fluency in Spanish for students at a wide variety of levels. I would love to help you do the same!
Writing,

Writing

In my four years of tutoring English both privately and on staff at the Hawken School Writing Center, I have discovered first-hand that one of the best ways to improve one's own writing is to edit that of others. All writers grow attached to their own work, which can make offering it up for criticism - especially self-criticism - a difficult and daunting task, but examining texts written by others allows students to focus on the mechanics of writing, unhindered by the emotions and intentions attached to their own work. For this reason, I use a "ground-up" approach to teaching writing, starting with simple exercises that teach students to identify and then use the building blocks of language (word choice, conciseness, and structure, for example). With these fundamentals firmly established, we can apply them to tackling larger writing assignments - ideally focused on topics that are personally relevant and interesting to each student - and developing the nuances that separate good writing from great. While math, science and even history are governed by laws and certain objective truths, the ability to write well can often feel like an intangible talent that must be given rather than taught. That idea, that the right words simply come to some people and not to others, is what can make the blinking cursor so intimidating and writers block so common. My priority is to create an environment in which students feel comfortable pushing themselves and making mistakes. In fact, for larger writing assignments, I actively encourage the technique of "free writing" to get students in the habit of simply jotting down ideas that can later be refined in the drafting and editing process. With a careful, customized practiced and a systematic approach, I firmly believe the vague idea of "good writing" can be demystified and deconstructed, and that any student can learn to master the English language.
Biology, English, Reading, Statistics

Music

Piano,

Piano

With four music-related degrees between my two parents and only sibling, the household in which I grew up lived and breathed music. I personally began my formal classical training at age four in the Preparatory Division at the prestigious Cleveland Institute of Music, where I studied music theory, composition, Dalcroze Eurhythmics, and the complete Suzuki piano curriculum in addition to receiving traditional piano instruction. This well-rounded music education, further supplemented when I began studying and performing jazz piano at age twelve, informs my holistic approach to tutoring piano. I teach all of my beginning students in accordance with the Simply Music Piano Method, which - like the Orff Schulwerk, the Kodály Method and other widely-accepted pedagogical techniques - is a "playing-based" approach that seeks to create an immersive environment for music-learning mirroring the one in which human beings naturally acquire language. Technical knowledge of notation and theory is introduced only after students have learned to play, sing and move their bodies to music. Though my experience in one-on-one piano instruction is mostly limited to children between the ages of 4 and 12, I am also qualified to teach intermediate and advanced repertoire, having competed at a national level in both jazz and classical piano.
Music Theory

Other

Geography, Philosophy

Science

ACT Science,

ACT Science

I was able to score a perfect 36 on the ACT Science section (and the test overall) and am now a physics major at Stanford, so I am highly familiar with both science as a field and the nuances of the subject on the ACT. Using a combination of test-specific tips and tricks and general practice with critical thinking skills and techniques, I have been able to significantly improve several past students scores in just a few sessions, and I would be thrilled to help you do the same.
Biochemistry,

Biochemistry

I have studied chemistry in almost every conceivable context, most recently as a physical chemist at Stanford University. I also conducted chemical engineering research on biochemical applications of nanoparticles at Case Western Reserve University, for which I won 4th-place in Chemistry at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This diversity of experiences has familiarized me not just with a variety of chemistry and biochemistry topics, but with various teaching styles as well, and a pride myself on adapting my methods based on continued feedback from students and their teachers about what works best with their particular learning style.
Chemistry,

Chemistry

I have studied chemistry in almost every conceivable context: I completed a traditional high school Honors Chemistry course, then independently-studied for the SAT Chemistry Subject Test and AP Chemistry Exams (on which I was able to attain perfect scores of 800 and 5, respectively), and am now studying physical chemistry at Stanford University. I also conducted chemical engineering research on nanoparticles at Case Western Reserve University, for which I won 4th-place in Chemistry at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This diversity of experiences has familiarized me not just with a variety of chemistry topics, but with various teaching styles as well, and a pride myself on adapting my methods based on continued feedback from students, parents, guardians and teachers about what works best with their particular learning style. A few things about my approach remain constant however. Whenever possible, I use a "flipped-classroom" active-learning model, in which I end each session by briefly introducing a new topic and then leaving students with a video - sometimes one from a free online resource such as Khan Academy or Crash Course, but often one specifically created for that student by me - that more fully explains it. Our in-person time, then, can be spent on assignments or customized sets of personally-relevant problems that I create for each session, pausing as we work through them together to clarify misconceptions and elaborate on ideas as they arise organically. Chemistry is fundamentally a problem-solving discipline, and in my experience this emphasis on critical reasoning rather than memorization can profoundly increase interest in and mastery of chemical concepts in just a few sessions.
Physical Science,

Physical Science

Physical science can often seem daunting to students who are put-off by equations, formulas, and terms to be memorized. In practice, though, physical science is simply about developing and applying scientific intuition about the world, something that all students practice (often without even realizing it) and are capable of mastering with a little guidance. Based on my four years of tutoring introductory science courses, I strongly believe that active learning is the best way to foster understanding of physical topics, meaning that my customized lesson plans eliminate lecturing and memorization whenever possible in favor of working through problems with students. In short, I ask far more questions of my students than I answer, guiding them to make connections and discoveries on their own. The problems and extended examples I design are meant to be personally relevant to each student, and systematically build upon one another to eventually achieve a complete understanding of a given topic.
Physics,

Physics

Though it is often feared as the most "mathy" of the sciences, the mathematical roots of physics make it possible to master without memorizing terms or even learning to use lab equipment. In fact, at an introductory level, physics is little more than applied algebra, and can be just as simple with a little guidance on how to set-up and solve equations as they relate to real-world phenomena. My teaching method, inspired by my own national-renowned high school physics teacher Robert Shurtz, focuses on just that: a systematic method of translating real-world problems into a list of known and unknown variables, and then selecting, setting-up and solving an appropriate equation that relates those variables. The active-learning lesson plans that I design for every session are customized for each student, sequentially applying this method to a series of problems that build upon each other to illuminate the specific concepts with which they most need help. Once fully understood, this basic method can be used to solve the vast majority of physics problems a student will encounter. Personally, it allowed me to become one of 400 national semi-finalist for the U.S. Physics Team, an experience that changed my life as a student and educator, and I would love to help you use it to achieve your goals in physics, whatever they may be.
Anatomy, Astronomy, Biology, Philosophy, Psychology

Sports/Recreation

Track & Field

Track & Field

In my six-year competitive Track & Field career, I had the opportunity to compete as a team captain at both the middle and high school levels. In both cases, my responsibilities included designing and implementing workouts and nutrition plans for middle-distance and distance runners, both male and female, across a wide range of ages and skill levels. Individually, I raced at least once in every competitive distance in high school athletics, from 100 to 3200 meters, but specialized in the 400 and 800 meters with personal record times of 0:49.68 and 1:59.08, respectively. I was the 2014 CVC 400 Meter Conference Champion and a four-time OHSAA Regional Finalist, including anchoring a school record-setting 4x400m relay team. I make a point of keeping up-to-date with exercise science literature and coaching best practices in order to construct highly scientific and individualized workout plans, but believe that a successful coach-athlete relationship in track must first and foremost foster mutual trust and enthusiasm for the sport.

Summer

Algebra 1,

Algebra 1

Too often, algebra is feared as the first abstract subject students encounter in their mathematical education, but when taught properly it can be as intuitive as elementary operations like multiplication and division. In my four years of experience tutoring Algebra I in schools and with private clients, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is often keeping problems grounded in reality. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical learning tools based on the Hands-On Equations® method, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra I and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Algebra 2,

Algebra 2

I have more experience tutoring Algebra 2 than any other subject, having done so as an official peer tutor for both Hawken Upper School and Stanford University, as well as in four years of private math coaching and one year on staff at the non-profit Esperanza, Inc. Though I make a point of tailoring my approach to the individual needs and learning styles of each student, I have found that the key to avoiding confusion and fostering mastery is usually to keep problem-solving as the central focus. I therefore use a very hands-on, active learning approach in which lecturing and formula memorization are avoided whenever possible. Instead, I structure each session around a custom set of problems and extended examples that are personally relevant to each student's interests and learning styles, and which build upon each other to gradually introduce and elaborate upon a given topic. My role is much more to ask questions than to give answers, letting students take the lead in making connections and discoveries while stepping in to clarify concepts and questions as they arise organically. Coupled with extensive use of physical and interactive learning tools such as Desmos®, this approach has enabled me to provide each of my students with a robust foundation in Algebra 2 and the confidence needed to continue building their mathematical career upon it.
Calculus,

Calculus

The leap from precalculus to calculus is perhaps the most daunting in the life of most math students, but it is also a golden opportunity to lay a robust academic foundation for nearly every scientific field. In fact, it can easily be argued that calculus is what makes math useful for real life, and because it is so intimately related to the world we live in every day the principles of calculus can actually be grasped rather intuitively if properly taught. My priority when teaching calculus is always to foster that intuition, making sure that students do not focus on simply memorizing formulas and techniques but on developing the knowledge they need to fully understand and derive them for themselves. Though I make a point of adapting my methods to each individual student's learning style, accomplishing this almost always involves an active-learning approach, in which I design a custom set of problems and extended examples for each lesson that are personally-relevant to the student and that build upon each other to introduce and elaborate on concepts. My sessions are therefore highly student-driven - my role is much less about answering questions as it is asking them, guiding students to make connections and draw conclusions for themselves while stepping in to clarify concepts and misconceptions as they arise organically. This focus on problem-solving can also be adapted to work through a student's own homework assignments if they feel more comfortable completing them in-session than on their own. In either case, I make sure to constantly relate the techniques used in an individual problem back to the core concepts of calculus (namely derivatives, integrals and the idea of infinitesimals) so that working through questions is not merely a rote task, but a contribution to and reinforcement of a fundamental understanding of calculus and its applications.
Chemistry,

Chemistry

I have studied chemistry in almost every conceivable context: I completed a traditional high school Honors Chemistry course, then independently-studied for the SAT Chemistry Subject Test and AP Chemistry Exams (on which I was able to attain perfect scores of 800 and 5, respectively), and am now studying physical chemistry at Stanford University. I also conducted chemical engineering research on nanoparticles at Case Western Reserve University, for which I won 4th-place in Chemistry at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This diversity of experiences has familiarized me not just with a variety of chemistry topics, but with various teaching styles as well, and a pride myself on adapting my methods based on continued feedback from students, parents, guardians and teachers about what works best with their particular learning style. A few things about my approach remain constant however. Whenever possible, I use a "flipped-classroom" active-learning model, in which I end each session by briefly introducing a new topic and then leaving students with a video - sometimes one from a free online resource such as Khan Academy or Crash Course, but often one specifically created for that student by me - that more fully explains it. Our in-person time, then, can be spent on assignments or customized sets of personally-relevant problems that I create for each session, pausing as we work through them together to clarify misconceptions and elaborate on ideas as they arise organically. Chemistry is fundamentally a problem-solving discipline, and in my experience this emphasis on critical reasoning rather than memorization can profoundly increase interest in and mastery of chemical concepts in just a few sessions.
GED,

GED

With a total test time that surpasses even the SAT and ACT, the GED can often seem like the most daunting exam facing a potential high school graduate. In reality, however, since it is designed to conform with a wide variety of high school curricula from across the country, the GED is one of the most predictable standardized tests in existence, and can be conquered with a little guidance and targeted preparation. My GED tutoring always starts with a diagnostic practice test, which I carefully analyze to determine not just how each of the four GED subjects should be prioritized during the study process, but which specific question types (multiple choice, drag and drop, fill in the blank or extended response, for example) need the most attention. By breaking down the test this minutely and learning as much as possible about each individual student's learning style, I can then create a customized study plan to ensure that no question is unfamiliar on test day. Regardless of the particulars, however, one thing about my approach remains constant: I strongly believe in active learning, and eliminate lecturing and rote memorization whenever possible in favor of active problem-solving that develops critical thinking skills. My ultimate goal is to teach students to view the GED "inside-out," recognizing what skill the test-makers are trying to test for each question and then using logical reasoning to arrive at a suitable answer. Consistent practice is key to developing this skill, so I always supplement in-person sessions with optional but recommended practice assignments so that students can spread out their preparation into an effective daily routine. As a tutor, I believe my role is much less about giving answers than it is asking questions, and that so long as students are willing apply themselves in investigating them and making connections, truly anyone can earn the life-changing achievement of a GED diploma.
Geometry,

Geometry

I have been tutoring geometry for a longer period of time than any other subject, beginning with becoming an official peer tutor while completing Honors Geometry as a freshman in high school. I am highly familiar, therefore, with both how geometry is taught in schools and the areas in which confusion often arises, which are often best clarified through guided 1-on-1 instruction. Being a highly visual topic, geometry is best understood I find through active problem-solving and diagram-drawing, so the lesson plans I design are always centered around guiding students through a custom sequence of problems that systematically explain and expand upon a given topic. I also make use of online tools such as Desmos with which students can build and play with geometric constructions and develop a very intuitive grasp of how they change and relate to one another.
Physics,

Physics

Though it is often feared as the most "mathy" of the sciences, the mathematical roots of physics make it possible to master without memorizing terms or even learning to use lab equipment. In fact, at an introductory level, physics is little more than applied algebra, and can be just as simple with a little guidance on how to set-up and solve equations as they relate to real-world phenomena. My teaching method, inspired by my own national-renowned high school physics teacher Robert Shurtz, focuses on just that: a systematic method of translating real-world problems into a list of known and unknown variables, and then selecting, setting-up and solving an appropriate equation that relates those variables. The active-learning lesson plans that I design for every session are customized for each student, sequentially applying this method to a series of problems that build upon each other to illuminate the specific concepts with which they most need help. Once fully understood, this basic method can be used to solve the vast majority of physics problems a student will encounter. Personally, it allowed me to become one of 400 national semi-finalist for the U.S. Physics Team, an experience that changed my life as a student and educator, and I would love to help you use it to achieve your goals in physics, whatever they may be.
Piano,

Piano

With four music-related degrees between my two parents and only sibling, the household in which I grew up lived and breathed music. I personally began my formal classical training at age four in the Preparatory Division at the prestigious Cleveland Institute of Music, where I studied music theory, composition, Dalcroze Eurhythmics, and the complete Suzuki piano curriculum in addition to receiving traditional piano instruction. This well-rounded music education, further supplemented when I began studying and performing jazz piano at age twelve, informs my holistic approach to tutoring piano. I teach all of my beginning students in accordance with the Simply Music Piano Method, which - like the Orff Schulwerk, the Kodály Method and other widely-accepted pedagogical techniques - is a "playing-based" approach that seeks to create an immersive environment for music-learning mirroring the one in which human beings naturally acquire language. Technical knowledge of notation and theory is introduced only after students have learned to play, sing and move their bodies to music. Though my experience in one-on-one piano instruction is mostly limited to children between the ages of 4 and 12, I am also qualified to teach intermediate and advanced repertoire, having competed at a national level in both jazz and classical piano.
SAT Math,

SAT Math

Compared both to other standardized tests like the ACT Math section and to typical math tests from a high school course, the SAT Math section tests the ability to quickly recognize basic concepts and avoid common errors much more than complex problem-solving. Though this can seem daunting, it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to properly prepare for the exam, because it means test-takers will encounter a very finite set of question types. By learning to see each of these questions "inside-out" like a test-writer, identifying not just what the question is asking but what concept it is testing, students can learn to recognize and avoid the most common traps and pitfalls, and from there perform the simple computations needed to arrive at the correct answer efficiently. My teaching method for the SAT Math section is specifically built to develop this skill quickly. A typical session will begin with a quick content review of a mathematical concept such as logarithms or geometric problem-solving, but the majority of each lesson is dedicated to applying that content to various SAT question types, emphasizing how critical thinking can be used to "see through" the question and rapidly identify the correct multiple-choice answer. By test day, students will be armed with: helpful mnemonics and tips for the few mathematical concepts that should actually be memorized; strategies for relieving testing anxiety; knowledge of how to get the most out of their calculator; and, most importantly, extensive problem-solving practice. For each of my past students, all of that has added up to a formula for confidence and success.
Spanish,

Spanish

I am an undergraduate at Stanford University, where I also work as an official peer tutor for the Spanish department. Though I have been speaking Spanish since age five and am a DELE Level C2 (fluent) speaker, Spanish is not one of my native languages, so I have first-hand experience with the way it is taught in high school classrooms and the areas in which confusion can often arise. So, after first carefully assessing the topics with which students most need help, I design custom active-learning lesson plans for each session that include both written and verbal exercises. Whenever possible, I avoid rote memorization of vocabulary and grammar rules, instead trying to organically integrate this knowledge into repetitive practice so that they are eventually second-nature. By using personally meaningful examples and supplementing in-person sessions with recommended listening, reading and online practice on platforms like StudySpanish, I have been able to rapidly increase interest and fluency in Spanish for students at a wide variety of levels. I would love to help you do the same!
Writing,

Writing

In my four years of tutoring English both privately and on staff at the Hawken School Writing Center, I have discovered first-hand that one of the best ways to improve one's own writing is to edit that of others. All writers grow attached to their own work, which can make offering it up for criticism - especially self-criticism - a difficult and daunting task, but examining texts written by others allows students to focus on the mechanics of writing, unhindered by the emotions and intentions attached to their own work. For this reason, I use a "ground-up" approach to teaching writing, starting with simple exercises that teach students to identify and then use the building blocks of language (word choice, conciseness, and structure, for example). With these fundamentals firmly established, we can apply them to tackling larger writing assignments - ideally focused on topics that are personally relevant and interesting to each student - and developing the nuances that separate good writing from great. While math, science and even history are governed by laws and certain objective truths, the ability to write well can often feel like an intangible talent that must be given rather than taught. That idea, that the right words simply come to some people and not to others, is what can make the blinking cursor so intimidating and writers block so common. My priority is to create an environment in which students feel comfortable pushing themselves and making mistakes. In fact, for larger writing assignments, I actively encourage the technique of "free writing" to get students in the habit of simply jotting down ideas that can later be refined in the drafting and editing process. With a careful, customized practiced and a systematic approach, I firmly believe the vague idea of "good writing" can be demystified and deconstructed, and that any student can learn to master the English language.
Biology, Reading, Statistics

Test Preparation

ACT English,

ACT English

The ACT English section is specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. I always supplement these in-person sessions with assignments that can be completed individually so that growth can be steadily maintained up until test day. More often than not, confusion arises in the ACT English section not because students cannot find what they think is a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the English section with confidence.
ACT Math,

ACT Math

Compared both to other standardized tests like the SAT Math section and to regular math tests that a student is likely to encounter during the high school year, the ACT Math section is a fast-paced exam that emphasizes quick recognition of concepts much more than complex problem-solving ability. Though this can seem daunting, it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to properly prepare for the exam, because it means test-takers will encounter a much more limited set of question types. By learning to see each of these questions "inside-out", identifying not just what the question is asking but what concept it is testing, students can learn to recognize and avoid the traps and pitfalls that test-makers often design, and from there perform the simple computations needed to arrive at the correct answer efficiently. My teaching method for the ACT Math section is specifically built to develop this skill quickly. A typical session will begin with a quick content review of a mathematical concept such as logarithms or geometric problem-solving, but the majority of each lesson is dedicated to applying that content to various ACT question types, emphasizing how critical thinking can be used to "see through" the question and rapidly identify the correct multiple-choice answer. By test day, students will be armed with: helpful mnemonics and tips for the few mathematical concepts that should actually be memorized; strategies for relieving testing anxiety; knowledge of how to get the most out of their calculator; and, most importantly, extensive problem-solving practice. For each of my past students, all of that has added up to a formula for confidence and success.
ACT Reading,

ACT Reading

The ACT Reading section is specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on reading comprehension - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. I always supplement these in-person sessions with assignments that can be completed individually so that growth can be steadily maintained up until test day. More often than not, confusion arises in the ACT Reading section not because students cannot find what they think is a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the English section with confidence.
ACT Science,

ACT Science

I was able to score a perfect 36 on the ACT Science section (and the test overall) and am now a physics major at Stanford, so I am highly familiar with both science as a field and the nuances of the subject on the ACT. Using a combination of test-specific tips and tricks and general practice with critical thinking skills and techniques, I have been able to significantly improve several past students scores in just a few sessions, and I would be thrilled to help you do the same.
GED,

GED

With a total test time that surpasses even the SAT and ACT, the GED can often seem like the most daunting exam facing a potential high school graduate. In reality, however, since it is designed to conform with a wide variety of high school curricula from across the country, the GED is one of the most predictable standardized tests in existence, and can be conquered with a little guidance and targeted preparation. My GED tutoring always starts with a diagnostic practice test, which I carefully analyze to determine not just how each of the four GED subjects should be prioritized during the study process, but which specific question types (multiple choice, drag and drop, fill in the blank or extended response, for example) need the most attention. By breaking down the test this minutely and learning as much as possible about each individual student's learning style, I can then create a customized study plan to ensure that no question is unfamiliar on test day. Regardless of the particulars, however, one thing about my approach remains constant: I strongly believe in active learning, and eliminate lecturing and rote memorization whenever possible in favor of active problem-solving that develops critical thinking skills. My ultimate goal is to teach students to view the GED "inside-out," recognizing what skill the test-makers are trying to test for each question and then using logical reasoning to arrive at a suitable answer. Consistent practice is key to developing this skill, so I always supplement in-person sessions with optional but recommended practice assignments so that students can spread out their preparation into an effective daily routine. As a tutor, I believe my role is much less about giving answers than it is asking questions, and that so long as students are willing apply themselves in investigating them and making connections, truly anyone can earn the life-changing achievement of a GED diploma.
PSAT,

PSAT

The latest version of the PSAT was specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency, for example - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the test is focused - word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions, and simple algebraic reasoning - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. More often than not, confusion arises on the PSAT not because students cannot find an answer they think is correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments and tips for tackling anxiety, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer every part of the PSAT.
SAT Math,

SAT Math

Compared both to other standardized tests like the ACT Math section and to typical math tests from a high school course, the SAT Math section tests the ability to quickly recognize basic concepts and avoid common errors much more than complex problem-solving. Though this can seem daunting, it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to properly prepare for the exam, because it means test-takers will encounter a very finite set of question types. By learning to see each of these questions "inside-out" like a test-writer, identifying not just what the question is asking but what concept it is testing, students can learn to recognize and avoid the most common traps and pitfalls, and from there perform the simple computations needed to arrive at the correct answer efficiently. My teaching method for the SAT Math section is specifically built to develop this skill quickly. A typical session will begin with a quick content review of a mathematical concept such as logarithms or geometric problem-solving, but the majority of each lesson is dedicated to applying that content to various SAT question types, emphasizing how critical thinking can be used to "see through" the question and rapidly identify the correct multiple-choice answer. By test day, students will be armed with: helpful mnemonics and tips for the few mathematical concepts that should actually be memorized; strategies for relieving testing anxiety; knowledge of how to get the most out of their calculator; and, most importantly, extensive problem-solving practice. For each of my past students, all of that has added up to a formula for confidence and success.
SAT Reading,

SAT Reading

The new SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section was specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. More often than not, confusion arises on SAT Reading and Writing questions not because students cannot find a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the Reading and Writing section.
SAT Writing

SAT Writing

The new SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section was specifically designed to test reasoning skills and critical thinking rather than prior knowledge. This can make preparing for the exam seem like an elusive task - it is much easier to measure concrete progress when memorizing vocabulary flashcards than working on word-choice and fluency - but it is actually good news for anyone who knows how to prepare effectively. By becoming familiar with the skills on which the new test is focused - command of evidence, word comprehension in context, analysis, expression of ideas and standard English conventions - and learning to identify which of these concepts is being tested on a given question, students can quickly begin to see the test "inside-out" and breakdown a seemingly daunting exam into a series of simple tasks. This is exactly what I aim to do with each of my students, using an active-learning approach that heavily favors problem-solving practice over lecturing. I always supplement these in-person sessions with assignments that can be completed individually so that growth can be steadily maintained up until test day. More often than not, confusion arises on SAT Reading and Writing questions not because students cannot find a correct answer, but because they misunderstand the essence of the question. By individually addressing each of the question types that students can expect on the exam, however, and supplementing in-person sessions with individual practice assignments, I make sure that any student willing to put in the time can divide and conquer the Reading and Writing section.

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Best Tutor we've ever had !

Aric is an amazing tutor. He's excellent at tutoring various subjects. Lately we've been focusing on Spanish and math but honestly no matter what subject my daughter has had challenges with Aric has been able to not only help her understand the material but also engages her critical thinking skills so that the she can confidently complete her assignments and later be tested on the subject earning exceptional marks. I highly recommend this tutor to all of you

Tamara, 1 lesson with Aric

Very Knowledgeable and Friendly Tutor!

Aric is teaching my son Algebra 2/Trigonometry. He has a great teaching style and my son really likes him and is "re" learning Algebra 2/Trigonometry! I highly recommend Aric.

Susan, 2 lessons with Aric

Very knowledgeable in Geometry. Very patient.

My daughter says that "Aric helped me understand concepts of geometry. He taught me to think more deeply about the concepts. " As the parent, I am very happy with the all the help that Aric is giving my daughter. He has made it easier for us to get through the quickness of our daughter taking Geometry over the summer. I'm hoping he'll be able to help with other subjects once school begins.

Chana, 15 lessons with Aric

Amazing tutor!

Thank you for helping me prepare for my Chemistry final. You explained everything in a way to help me better understand the concepts I was having difficulty with. I truly felt more confident and prepared. I appreciate all the research you did ahead of time, reviewing all my past exams/quizzes and focusing on areas where I needed improvement. You really go the extra mile as a tutor and I'm so appreciative! Thank you so much Aric.

Brittany, 3 lessons with Aric
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Aric F.

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Response time: 3 hours