Search 78,174 tutors
FIND TUTORS

Blogs Blogs

Newest Most Active

Have you ever been in a situation where comments were made in a negative form. Well I have, I would be 17 years old in my English, History, or biology class and would say to my self, " I hate this", or "teachers are boring", or "I will never be able to understand and figure this out". Well if I could only go back and say that, "yes, yes you can", Learning can be fun, challenging but exciting. Here are some of my creative ways I teach my pupils. Depending on age, attitude, area of subject, and behavior of the person, I can easily make adjustments to different learning plans to focus on their needs.   1) Create useful and relevant learning experiences based on the age group and interests. For example: you love everything outside, well why not create a learning environment outside, full of activities you love to do. Every subject can be implemented into activities of your interest.   2) Explore.... Having multiple different... read more

Wyzant is my favorite hobby, as well as my chosen occupation.  I spend hours at least, on an average, working with the Internet, my own library of teaching materials, and public library resources, preparing for each lesson, plus often an hour in follow-up.  I am a long-time researcher from my completion of:     (1) Paralegal Certificate from the Roosevelt University Lawyer;s Assistant Program,   (2) Associate Degree in Data Processing with High Honors from the City Colleges of Chicago, (3) Graduate school credits, mostly from the Graduate School of Exceptional Education of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, for an Endorsement in Special Education to my K-9 Illinois Teacher's Certificate, and (4) Credits in education with my B.A. in Liberal Arts with an English major from Dominican University.

Wyzant is my favorite hobby, as well as my chosen occupation.  I spend hours at least, on an average, working with the Internet, my own library of teaching materials, and public library resources, preparing for each lesson, plus often an hour in follow-up.  I am a long-time researcher from my completion of:     (1) Paralegal Certificate from the Roosevelt University Lawyer;s Assistant Program,   (2) Associate Degree in Data Processing with High Honors from the City Colleges of Chicago, (3) Graduate school credits, mostly from the Graduate School of Exceptional Education of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, for an Endorsement in Special Education to my K-9 Illinois Teacher's Certificate, and (4) Credits in education with my B.A. in Liberal Arts with an English major from Dominican University.

At the beginning of my senior year of college, everyone was panicking about the possibility of not finding a job before graduation. Hence, job fairs were heavily attended. While attending a job fair hosted by the business school, I was encouraged to discuss finance positions at Abercrombie and Fitch by a recruiter. I decided I had nothing to lose and introduced myself. She then asked me what I scored on the SAT. Yes, she was referring to the exam that I took over five years ago. After awkwardly staring at her in disbelief, I answered her question and kindly ended the conversation. I do not agree with how the recruiter tried to put me in a box, but as Tupac said, “I was given this world, I didn’t make it.” Doing well on the SAT pays dividends and high school students may encounter this recruiter in the future, so I have decided to share my experience with the SAT. Five Years Ago… As many of my classmates prepared to gain admission to the University of Texas, I was... read more

Are these type problems giving you the blues.  Do not fear.  Learn these simple strategies for solving them.   The first thing you want to do is read the problem twice.  Once to get familiar with the problem.  A second time to understand what is being asked.    The second thing you want to do is look for important information that is in the problem.  Information such as numerical values and keywords or phrases.  "How many more", "total", "difference", etc.  These keywords give you a hint on what approach to use to solve the problem.    Here is an example of a word problem:   Naruto and Sasuke are on a retrieval mission to collect scrolls that contain classified content.  They must retrieve 25 scrolls in all and bring them back to the Hidden Leaf Village.  Sasuke is more skillful in search missions than Naruto is.  If Sasuke collected 16... read more

I have been tutoring our future soldiers in helping them pass their ASVAB exams.  I specialize in the Math area, and I have thoroughly enjoyed it!  Helping pave the way for our future soldiers to fight and defend our country is very rewarding.  Most of them already have high levels of English Comprehension, Writing skills, and Science levels.  They just need the extra push in the Math area.  All of my students have went on to pass their exams and are now serving our country!  I can't think of anything more rewarding!

As a high school English teacher I am constantly asked the same question for writing assignments, “how many paragraphs does it need to be?” I hate this question. I hate that somewhere students were taught that the number paragraphs dictates the quality of the writing. That someone has quantified how many paragraphs make a good essay. I can name names, but for anyone who knows writing instruction and the theories behind it, you know who I am referring to and probably know the disciples of her method. Perhaps you are one of them, preaching the structure of one paragraph for your introduction, complete with hook and thesis. Three paragraphs for your body, full of topic sentences and transitions. Finally the concluding paragraph, I can’t wait to hear you restate your thesis! My question is a simple one. When do we see this method at work after high school?  When in a college class would a paragraph essay be sufficient for talking about the effects of over-expansion... read more

Let me keep this list brief and to-the-point so that the learning can begin ASAP:   1)  Give relevant examples to help illustrate the "answer" or desired outcome.  For example:  Before trying to perfect a piece on the piano, try singing it like a jazz trumpet or tapping out the rhythms on a drum.   2)  Allow time to absorb and repeat back information:  being prepared to teach about something helps ensure that the student really knows what they've learned!    3)  Take some time to discuss other learning success stories and analyze what factors contributed to those accomplishments:  if memorizing vocabulary words and their definitions helped get a high percentage correct on a test, try the same with segments of a musical piece before trying to tackle the entire thing.    4)  Do something tangible to help the information get stored in another part of the brain: ... read more

When I tutor 4th and 5th graders, sometimes I share with them that all everyone really needs to know in life mathematically is a 6th grade level of math.  Then, I hedge that it's still good to know more, just as it's good to be stronger than one needs to be to carry out most tasks!  But a 6th grade level of math is critical for being a good steward and a good citizen and tragically many lack it.  It's not unlike a form of blindness that can too easily be taken advantage of and I like to see my work as helping folks believe they can see better!   But beyond that, I wonder what our world would be like if we all got and used a 6th grade level of mathematics? What would our election campaigns be like if everyone was scrutinizing both sides budget plans and demanding more detail and reasoning than the vague statements politicians prefer to say... Maybe Europe or Asia might give us clues???  But big ideas like these are part of what motivates me...

Overview: Current SAT vs. Redesigned SAT Details of the new SAT have been a mystery since the new format was announced last year. We have been doing our best over the past several months to keep our students up-to-date by scouring the internet for reliable information. Collegeboard.com recently published the key differences between the old test and the new test. Since this information comes directly from the source, we have decided to disply the key differences between the old and new tests here: OLD TEST TIMING: 3 hours and 45 minutes NEW TEST TIMING: 3 hours (plus 50 minutes for the Essay [optional]) OLD TEST COMPONENTS Critical Reading Writing Mathematics Essay NEW TEST COMPONENTS Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Reading Test Writing and Language Test Math Essay (optional) OLD TEST EMPHASIS Emphasis on general reasoning skills Emphasis on vocabulary, often in limited contexts Complex... read more

I think tutoring is fun mostly because both the student and I are putting in a joint effort to help the student become a better student. We are both taking time out of our days to sit down and focus on learning material, because learning it is something that we both value! As a tutor I will always have a plan, but most importantly I will plan with you. Lessons vary based on the student and the material. But, the one thing that will stay the same is the fact that I am not going to sit for an hour, or hours, and lecture you. Tutoring is a way for the students to interact and learn in a way that they may not be able to sitting in a classroom. I will take your interests, strengths, weaknesses, etc. and incorporate them into the lesson plans as much as possible. I give allotted breaks were I see fit and have no problem with saying, "Hey, it looks like you are done for the day. Let's pick up here next time." And I promise to always say if we are entering into an area that... read more

Hello everyone!    I figured I could start off my first post with a little bit more information about what I have to offer to any of my students.   Currently, I am 18 and finishing my Senior year of High School at an all girls' school in Rochester, NY. I will be attending a college nearby in the fall and planning on majoring in English with a concentration in creative writing and minoring in Psychology.    I have completed seven AP courses in my high school career including World History, U.S. History, European History, Language and Composition, Literature and Composition, Biology, and Psychology. I have taken AP tests on all of these subjects and can help students who are preparing to take these tests to prepare effectively considering I myself have taken them.    I am mostly interesting in tutoring English students K-12 as that is the subject I am best at, but I am also able to tutor in any of the subjects listed... read more

I have a MA in Medieval Studies/Classical and Medieval Latin and a BA in Classics and English. I also hold a certification in advanced Latin from the University of Toronto's Centre for Mediaeval Studies. I have six years of experience working as a tutor, helping students with Latin and English grammar and vocabulary, as well as working with them to improve their research, writing, and analytical skills. I find tutoring to be greatly rewarding and enjoy nothing more than seeing my students excel in subjects they once struggled with. I look forward to working with new students this summer and beyond!

Last weekend was a blast. I was helping a client and they were very kind to invite me to their godson's communion party on Sat. Since they are from Mexico, I was really looking forward to dancing with my wife.   We got to meet more of their family and also enjoy more of the Mexican culture. There was a professional Taco Stand that served taco "a la orden" or "to order." You could choose from chicken, pork, beef and any type of toppings your heart desired. You had to be careful of the tomatillo salsa, that was so spicy it could melt your face off.   And I still have it. It may have been a while and I can still dance a good salsa. Everyone like to watch the chubby guy dance. 

This post is inspired by an article I read, “Be Less Helpful” by Joshua Zucker (can be found at this link: http://www.mathteacherscircle.org/assets/legacy/newsletter/MTCircularAutumn2012.pdf) and I am here to relate it to my teaching and tutoring experiences. When working with students, it can be easy to watch struggling students and thoughtlessly just give them the answers. Why do we do this? Well, for a variety of reasons. Maybe we empathize with the struggling student and want to alleviate their pain. Perhaps we are impatient and have already solved the problem mentally several times over. Maybe we think the question is asking too much of the students. Perhaps we’re worried that they are taking too much time and should move on to the next problem. Maybe they have made three incorrect guesses and we feel it’s time to just give it to them. Perhaps we are really enthusiastic about teaching and are overly anxious to show them how to do it. (Remember, depending on the subject... read more

Absolutely!  My tutoring lessons are fun for several reasons.  First of all, I really love my work and that excitement is contagious.  I can help you appreciate and enjoy English, including Grammar!  Secondly, I work really hard to understand your needs and your learning style.  I can design lessons that are easy for you to connect with.  Another thing I bring to my tutoring is variety.  Most people learn in a multitude of ways, and I connect with these through different venues such as games, puzzles, and music, along with the traditional methods of written and oral assignments and assessment.  I will help you apply what you are learning to your real life situations.  Finally, and most importantly, I will listen to you - what you want, what you need, what you hate, what you already know how to do.    Five Things Your Tutor Should Do To Make Learning Fun Love teaching and love their subject Understand how you... read more

CBS News - http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/07/08/upper-west-side-school-teaches-pre-schoolers-chess/ ABC News - http://7online.com/archive/9191201/   TestingMom.com - https://www.testingmom.com/blog/new-york-city-chess-expert-%E2%80%93-testingmom-com-approved/  

1. Find out what your student likes to do and incorporate it into your lesson when possible.  2. Games, games, games! Involve other family members when possible.  The more, the merrier. 3. Give your student ownership of their lesson. Give choices and let them pick what to do first, next, last. 4. Build relationships with your families.  Be friendly and professional.  Talk with parents before you leave in a relaxed atmosphere.  5. Have fun yourself. Kids are great and love attention from another adult. Talk to them, listen to them, enjoy your time with them.

Here in the Southeastern US, schools are getting out for summer vacation.  It has been a great year for me, working with my students and getting to know my families.  Here are a few tips to help your child get through the summer with the minimum amount of lost information from the year just completed.  1. Read! Library cards for the family are a wonderful thing. Plan weekly trips to the local library.  Great books, free of charge (if you return on time), and a way for your child to select books they can read by themselves.  2. Play! Find board games that stretch your child. Chess, Chinese checkers, Monopoly,  Risk...find games that make you think. 3. Work! Find flashcards and academic games that target the area where your child is challenged. 15 minutes 3 times a week will do wonders.  I hope you all have an awesome summer. Don't forget to keep in touch with your tutor and plan lessons through the summer break to keep things sharp... read more

My name is Tyler Cianciulli I am a syndicated columnist for several regional papers, including The New York Times. Additionally, I scored a 34 on the ACT, and currently attend Villanova University's School of Business. I am available for tutoring in person, or online, and will work to create an affordable rate. Tyler Cianciulli

RSS Blogs RSS feed