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As an educator, I strive to further the development and understanding of students. As such, when first getting to know a student, I give a quick summary quiz to better inform me of the student's understanding of the subject. This is followed by a general overview of the subject and then detailed study of the areas in need. Each student is unique and the process will vary in the time it takes for the student to fully understand.

As the school year ramps up again, I wanted to put out a modified version of a Memo of Understanding http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memo_of_understanding for parents and students. It seems each year in the rush to get through the first weeks of school parents and students forget the basic first good steps and then the spiral downwards occurs and then the need for obtaining a tutor and then the ‘wish for promises’ from a tutor. Pay attention to your child’s folder or agenda book. A student is generally not able to self regulate until well into high school. Some people never quite figure it out. Be the best person you can be by helping your child check for due dates, completeness, work turned in on time. Not only will this help your child learn to create and regulate a schedule, it prevents the following types of conversations I always disliked as a teacher ("Can you just give my child one big assignment to make up for the D/F so they can pass"; "I am going to... read more

Nearly all high school and college students have a research paper requirement. Many college students are likely facing imminent research paper deadlines as the semester ends. Writing research papers can cause a lot of anxiety. This article will teach you how to narrow your research topic, clarify your thesis statement, and sort and organize your research to help you simplify your final editing process. Editing for Both Quality and Quantity. One common issue is having a research paper that is either too long or too short. Narrowing and clarifying your topic will help you write a better thesis statement and help you use only your most important or interesting facts and information. A properly focused topic will help save time by helping you use more specific keywords and phrases for your Internet search. You’ll be able to collect the facts you need in no time. Narrowing Your Topic. Many teachers or professors give students a broad research paper topic. For example, your... read more

It's ChristmasTime! Can you believe another year will soon be over? As we reflect on this years events and look forward to a bright new year, keep your childs' education in mind. There are so many opportunities we all need to take advantage of. There are so many educational games, cards, books, and even dvd's that would make great stocking stuffers, events to broaden your childs' mind and time spent just talking. And of course, your weekly tutoring sessions! During this free time between the holidays, I will be available and ready to work around your busy Christmas and New Years schedules. They have been working hard, but the long haul will be coming in January. Let's not slack now. Keep them sharp and ready for new challenges. Call, text, email, we can schedule a time that is convenient for you. As always, I am looking forward to working with you and your child in the coming New Year. Happy Holidays to everyone!

To those of you looking for a tutor that has a range of possibilities, I dedicate this blog to you. Being a recent graduate from the University of California, Santa Barbara, I know what it takes to use study skills to focus and remain organized in order to maintain a clean academic record. Graduating in only three years, I have had the opportunity to manage a schedule of work and school and internships, while studying and applying to law schools. Organization is one of my many skills that translates into my tutoring ability. I am currently a tutor. My focus has been editing, proofreading and college applications. However, I am a former kindergarten instructor. That opportunity fine tuned my patience, my understand that each student is an individual learner, and taught me how to approach difficult situations with younger children. I look forward to opportunities to come from this site, and look forward to your commentary. Many thanks, Davina

As you know, all teachers (and tutors!) were once students. So they know all the pitfalls that can cause a student to not get their homework done. The reason can be social - maybe the student wants to get his or her work done but the distraction of all the social media is too much to resist. The reason can also be academic - maybe the subject is difficult, such as challenging concepts or perhaps they're faced with an assignment that didn't get explained well enough to be done independently. Or sometimes it's the dreaded PROCRASTINATION. That can be the worst of all reasons to not get work done because the longer you procrastinate, the more the work piles up and then the student becomes "paralyzed", overwhelmed by the mountain of work that has accumulated. When procrastination has gotten the better of you, the important thing is to not let yourself be so overwhelmed that you don't do the work at all. Here's what you do: PRIORITIZE AND GET STARTED! It is a simple... read more

When using the internet, it is important to make sure you have a quality source to site from. There are a varity of websites and blogs that are written with bias or an agenda, you always want to be confident you've sited a professional and not an ideologue. Colleges and libraries have a database you can access that have quality sources, and most everyone should have free access to them, but if you're like me, and you like to use something your professor hasn't seen or possibly is unaware of, then I suggest you look into the Library of Congress and the National Archives as a primary source. If you are looking for professional opinions, then I would suggest finding professors that have published works. They can be a great secondary source that can either confirm or dispute your thesis and theories. NEVER use blogs! Never use wikipedia, although some material on wiki is a good place to start your research; to gain some perspective on your subject, most professors will not... read more

Hi, I'm a new tutor to this site. Within the past few days, I've been working on getting certified in as many subjects as possible. These are all of the subjects I'm certified to tutor in on the website. Most of the subjects are in math or science. Some are in English topics as well like in reading and writing, etc. I also am certified to tutor to prepare for a lot of standardized tests and a few common computer software programs people use. Please read my profile if you need a new tutor in the Hillsboro or Portland area! -Ann

Summer learning loss can affect everyone. Teachers must spend quite a bit of time in the beginning of every year reviewing to get students past the summer slump. There are a variety of ways you can keep yourself or your child from losing to much ground over summer. One of the best ways to keep the brain sharp and active is to keep reading both fiction and nonfiction literature at or above grade level. Even if it is only 25 minutes a day, you will keep the reading skills sharp and continue to learn new things. I also found out that Barnes and Nobles is offering a free new book reward to children who read 8 books. You can check out their website or visit the nearest store for more information. Whether in a cool place during the heat of the day, or as part of the night time relaxation, reading for 25 or more minutes is possibly the best time investment you can make. There are also many kinds of puzzles you can practice solving such as Suduko to keep the math and problem solving... read more

It is often examples that make ideas understandable to students and current events can be a good source of examples. Case in point. Today in Wisconsin, the issue of the day is the outcome of the recall elections and problems with the exit polling. As a tutor, the outcome isn’t interesting, but exit polling like all surveys is key to the usefulness of statistics! In fact, it gives a great opportunity to illustrate some of the basic (and non-mathematical) ideas and concepts of statistics — usually the ideas presented at the beginning of most introduction-to-statistics courses. Statistical inferences are grounded in some basic definitions and assumptions (in bold). A population is a defined collection of individuals that we want to know some data about and a sample is a group taken from the population that we are going to actually collect data from (Sullivan, 2010, p. 5; Triola, 2010, p. 4). If we wanted to know the actual data about a population, which is called a parameter,... read more

This blog is specific to the AP (Advanced Placement Exams). Not to date myself any further but how things have changed. When I was in High School, there were only a handful of exams that a student could sit for in terms of Advanced placement exams. There were your basic sciences, such as Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, and of course English Literature and US Government. However, nowadays, students have up to 34 AP exams to choose from, ranging from Chinese to Art History to French or any other subjects a student could imagine. So why sit for these exams? what are the advantages? First is the tangible benefits, which are: 1. Taking and acing the AP exams are much cheaper than paying for college credits at most major universities. Thus, students who prepared in advanced, no pun intended, could easily see major financial savings. 2. By passing AP exams and earning college credits, you graduate sooner. Also, allowing you to have either a lighter course load or allowing... read more

A study techniques can be utilized to tackle any subject, especially when you are required to retain information on multiple subjects. There are many techniques that can be used and some of which I found helped me survive both undergraduate school and graduate school. I've listed some of them below for you and provide an explanation of each. 1. Mnemonics or mnemonic device - is a learning technique that aids memory. To improve long term memory, mnemonic systems are used to make memorization easier. They do so by increasing efficiency of the process of consolidation of facts and information. This process involves the conversion of short term memory to long term memory. 2. Outlining - This should be a two step process. You should begin outlining at the beginning of the course and continually updating the outline as the course proceeds. During your finals week, you should then take your long course outline and condense it down to a two page key word memory jogger or concept... read more

My emerging tutoring passion is assisting ESL college students with their coursework. Most of them must also hold full-time jobs to support themselves and often their families as well. Many require online courses to get college educations. They could not earn a college degree any other way. Do textbook publishing companies realize how much cultural bias is written into their online ancillary (supplemental) materials? Do teachers of online college courses realize how hopeless these students feel about merely passing a class when their grades depend on online multiple-choice exams consisting of 60 items to be completed in 60 minutes (60 in 60), for example? This may be a subtle form of cultural bias, but bias it is. Frankly, as a native speaker of American English with a master’s degree in journalism from University of Wisconsin—Madison, I’m not sure I could pass a 60 in 60 exam. I would like to challenge the instructors who teach these online courses and college administrators... read more

Hi there I'm Michael; I'm 22 and just graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor's in Political Science. As a native Brooklyner, I attended school in Brooklyn my whole life, starting at P.S. 230, then Mark Twain I.S. 239 and then Brooklyn Technical H.S. I've taken many of those tests to get into school, such as the Specialized HS exam, the SATs to get into college so I'm familiar with testing formats and how to do well on them. My strength is more so on Critical Reading and English so I would just teach that. I am a very patient and understanding person who enjoys teaching others! Feel free to email me for more information. As an undergrad, I studied Political Science, concentrating in International Relations; I studied many different countries, international concepts and theories. To get a sample of what I mean, I will give an example. In International Relations, there are various theories to explain the world and how states (that is countries) behave towards each... read more

America the Giving by Cindy M. “Giving, giving, giving—Americans are always giving,” says Maria, an English-as-a-Second-Language student, as we talk about an upcoming charitable event. American generosity is both a wonder and a puzzlement to her, but she is sincere when she smiles and adds, “I am glad I am here. There was nothing for us in Bosnia. We are American now.” Maria’s words stay with me as I ponder what actually makes an American American. What characteristics do Americans possess that identify us as American as opposed to displaced Bosnians, Italians, Mexicans, Africans, Asians or Cherokees? Could it be as simple as Maria says? Could it be this knack we have of giving freely of ourselves above and beyond the call of duty? Can the character of a people be defined by their simple acts of kindness and charity alone? Is compassionate a sufficient adjective to describe us as a people? But folks like Maria perceive Americans differently. While we see... read more

"Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" is the first line of a famous and often-quoted speech by Mark Antony in the play Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. From my view as a college instructor and sales and marketing rep...some students would rather glue themselves and their chair to the floor before they would come up to the front of the class to speak about an assignment, let alone try public speaking. Well, they're not alone (I felt that way MANY times in high school). However, this is an important part of college--and life: SOMEONE wants to hear what you think and know--and speaking in public about it can be one of the most empowering things you can do (without the chair glued to you). I know: I used to have raging stage fright--I was just terrified of speaking in front of a crowd, let alone the classroom. Naturally, this doesn't go over well with anyone who has plans to be a teacher! The good news (yes, that's right) is that many colleges... read more

What's on your mind to develop an idea for that assignment? "Who, What, When, Where, and How." These are the basics for writing school papers--and they work very easily in planning a thesis too. They are the backbone of good journalism too. They help students prepare notes for public speaking, they are useful for research, and they keep you focused. "Who" is anyone relevant to your subject or idea. If you need citations, the better individuals in a paper or assignment are ones who are experts or noted in the field that you're discussing. Credentials count here, both in a job title as well as academic pedigree (Ph.D. or M.A. as possible. You can also show where they work; a quality source can be referenced by an academic or other professional organizational connection.) The "Who" of your assignment or paper shows the significance of someone who comments or validates ideas that are connected with your thesis and the subject of your paper... read more

This is my first post so I'll tell you all about how I started tutoring! I graduated from The University of Texas last May and began exploring career options. After applying to endless amounts of jobs and finding that 85% of all 2010 May graduates are unemployed, I realized I was going to have to get creative. Since then, I have been homeschooling a high school student named Contessa and it has been a very rewarding experience! I have been working with her since July and its really exciting to see her confidence and eagerness to learn increase over the past 4 months. So far we have almost completed Algebra I and US Government, and we're about half way through Chemistry. In English we've read "The Great Gatsby," "The Open Boat," and various poems. I had Contessa start compiling a list of vocabulary words from everything we read so when she takes the SAT in a few years she will already be prepared! We are currently working on essay writing skills... read more

Cynthia was an ESL student taking an intro to government/ political science class. When I asked her if she had taken English 100 or 101, she said "No" because she had enrolled too late. I figured that this was an opportunity for me to teach her an important tool, otherwise she might struggle in her poli-sci class. Her class assignment was, "What is your dream law?". She had to find out about an issue and take a position on it with supporting research. She requested my help in writing a 5-6 page essay. The problem was that all she had written was 1 paragraph. She knew what she wanted to write about, she even had read two articles to research her topic. BUT WHAT DO I SAY? HOW DO I WRITE IT CLEARLY? These were here concerns. I helped her by saying she needed to OUTLINE her thoughts before writing her entire essay. An outline makes it so much easier. Every outline starts with a Main Idea (Thesis Sentence) which clearly states the whole point of your... read more

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