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#1. You must lose some battles before you can win the war.-“Timing” you have 2 minutes for every quant question (37 Quant Q’s total) and about 90 seconds for each verbal question (41 Verbal Q’s total.)  There will be a clock on your screen that counts down how many minutes you have left for that particular section. While verbal can be a bit more confusing due to the reading comprehension passages, Quant/Math questions are clear-cut.  How do you get keep pace?  Set some mile-markers by memorizing the ones I’ve listed below.  At each minute, you should ideally be at the question listed.  If you’re too slow, speed up a little bit, but not too much.  If you’re too fast, take a deep breath.   75 minutes-37 Questions 60 minutes- Question 7 45 minutes- Question 15 30 minutes- Question 23 15 minutes -Question 30 10 minutes-Question 33 5 minutes- Question 35 2 minutes-Question 37   #2. Don’t be Late-... read more

There are 3 question types on the verbal section of the GMAT: sentence correction, critical reasoning, and reading comprehension. For sentence correction questions, the key is realizing that you shouldn't learn every single grammar rule. Instead focus on: Verbs - Use subject-verb agreement & correct verb tense according to the meaning of the sentence. Pronouns - Check for noun-pronoun agreement (e.g. "she" when referring to Mary) & fix pronoun ambiguities (e.g. Mary and Kelly are sisters. She likes to eat cake.) Idioms - The list of idioms is limited so memorize it. Here is a great list: GMAT Idioms List Comparison - Only "apples" to "apples" comparisons. For example this is incorrect: "Unlike Italy and France, the economy of the US is awesome." Parallelism: The key is TO LOOK for lists, DETERMINE what needs to be parallel, and KEEP it parallel. Or: The key is TO LOOK for lists, TO DETERMINE what needs... read more

The GMAT has 4 sections: 1) Analytical Writing Assessment: Write an essay in 30 minutes to demonstrate that you can identify the flaws of an argument and provide areas for improvement. 2) Integrated Reasoning: In 30 minutes tackle 12 questions that test your ability to interpret graphs, draw conclusions from tables, analyze word problems, and answer questions using multiple sources of information (e.g. emails and tables). 3) Quantitative Section: In 75 minutes, tackle 37 math-related questions that draw from Algebra, Number Properties, Geometry, Arithmetic and other math areas. Questions are classified into Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency, which is question type unique to the GMAT test. 4) Verbal Section: In 75 minutes, tackle 41 verbal-related questions that cover reading comprehension, sentence correction, and critical reasoning.

Summer is the best time to start studying for college/career entrance exams. Since there is no school and homework, you will not feel overwhelmed when it is time to study. Studying for just an hour a day, 5 days a week, will increase your chances of getting a higher score and you will still have time to enjoy the summer. Alternate subjects weekly. Familiarize yourself with all the subjects on the test. Purchase a test preparation book to get question examples. By the end of the summer, you should have done every problem in the book, including the practice exams. If you need additional help, ask your tutor. Study with others. You will be more motivated to study this summer if you are involved in a study group. Find students that are taking the same exam. Ask your tutor to for a group study session. Knowing that there are other students with the same goal as you can help your study sessions be less stressful. Know your calculator. If a calculator is... read more

Having worked with hundreds of test-takers on standardized exams over the years, I have tutored students of all abilities and levels of commitment to their studies. Most students want to know how many hours of tutoring are necessary to achieve the results they desire. While there is no single number of hours uniformly required for all students, for all exams, I do recommend as a rule of thumb that you spend as many hours working on your own as you have spent working with your tutor. To maximize the benefit of working with a tutor for a standardized test, it is necessary to implement, and then practice, the strategies you've learned on your own. Ideally, a student matches the time spent studying independently hour for hour with the time spent tutoring (similarly, university courses typically advise a minimum of one hour of study for every hour spent in class). It is to your advantage to meet with your tutor frequently, and early, enough that the tools you acquire to succeed... read more

  With the wealth of GMAT prep materials out there, it can be tough to find the best resources for GMAT study. I've been tutoring for the GMAT for five years, and these are the materials I've found to be the most helpful.   GMAT General Study   The best source of practice problems is The Official Guide for GMAT Review, published by GMAC. Working through the questions in this book will prepare anybody for the questions on the test. GMAC also publishes practice tests that are just like what you'll see on test day, and they are a great way to gauge your current score and get used to the CAT format. The software, GMATPrep, is available for download from mba.com. For students who need more practice problems, I recommend The Official Guide for GMAT Quantitative Review and The Official Guide for GMAT Verbal Review. These books offer additional practice, but the problems are not as difficult as the problems in the The Official Guide... read more

For anyone that is preparing or thinking about preparing for one of the standardized 'high stakes' tests (you know which ones) -- the SAT, GRE, GMAT, ISEE, SSAT, and so on -- there's something you really should know about test development.   But first consider this. Wouldn't it be sensible for tests to discover what your strengths are and what you do well in?  Of course! But who said these tests or the test developers are sensible?  In fact, why should they be?  Here are two things test developers don't want you to know   1) Test developers usually (meaning not EVERY test is created this way, although most are) try to trick students into providing the wrong answer. Huh?    2) Standardized tests are intentionally designed so that many or even most students will not complete them within the given time limit.   Now why would these nice testing companies engage in these practices?  Select the best... read more

All the major test prep books for the SAT, ACT, and GRE -- published by companies like Kaplan, Princeton Review, Barron's, and Manhattan Test Prep -- are poorly written, conceptually deficient, and, worst of all, riddled with serious errors. Students can't be expected to learn from books that aren't even right! And I don't mean the books are riddled simply with typos, which unfortunately is also true, because they are so poorly edited; I mean they really are riddled with serious conceptual errors. Here's a simple example from the very beginning -- the diagnostic test, of all things! -- of Princeton Review's "1,014 GRE Practice Questions." The problem is on page 24, and the answer key and explanation is on page 38. Not only is their answer wrong; what's worse, their *explanation* is wrong, too! I'll set off the problem by dashes (----) and then add more commentary after. NOTE: The question is a classic GRE "quantitative comparison," so it's hard to... read more

Congratulations to CHRIS, for getting A's in some very challenging business courses. You are taking a heavy load of classes, plus you have other multiple responsibilities. You deserve a lot of credit for your good work in your Information Systems, Financial Accounting II, Management, and other classes. You're headed for success. Keep up the good work!

Have you scheduled a time to take one of the standardized tests listed in the subject line? Are you thinking about signing up to take one of them? Have you taken one already, but have decided to take it again in the hopes of getting a higher score? Have you taken one of the tests, and found the experience so rewarding, you plan to sign up and take the same test simply for the enjoyment? (If you’re in the latter category, I’d seriously examine your core values ; < ). Regardless, if you must take one, and nearly everyone does that plans to enroll in a college, university, professional school, or private school, here is a suggestion that I haven’t read about in any of the testing prep manuals or on any of the websites devoted to improving one’s score on these tests. And that advice is to beware of the “positive I’m correct about this answer ‘rush’” This phenomenon may occur on the multiple-choice segments of these tests because, of course, you want to finish and get out... read more

As you may know, I am a big fan of the well-known author and brain specialist, Dr. Daniel Amen. He mentions in several of his books that Physical Exercise is good for the brain. I have read of research studies that showed a clear correlation between IMPROVEMENT in students' test scores in math and science, and their level of physical activity (for example, when math class followed PE class, the students had significantly higher scores). Maybe we should schedule PE before all math classes in our schools. What do you think about that idea? This morning I read an online article on the myhealthnewsdaily site, entitled "6 Foods That Are Good for Your Brain," and another article about how Physical Exercise helps maintain healthy brain in older adults too. The second article, "For a Healthy Brain, Physical Exercise Trumps Mental Workout" was found under Yahoo News. The remainder of this note is quoted from that article: Regular physical exercise appears... read more

I struck up a conversation with a home-schooling mom the other day. Parent of a middle-school student, she told me I should talk to middle school parents about this topic because, as she put it, “We don’t know what we don’t know.” In my blog post “Test Prep Students 1: Before Our First Session, Please,” I mentioned planning ahead to give yourself more time to prepare. Since then, I’ve come to believe that you can’t have too much time to prepare, regardless of what you are testing for * High school graduation (Minnesota GRAD) * College National Merit Scholarships (PSAT/NMSQ) * Advance college credit (AP, CLEP) * College admission (ACT, SAT, TOEFL, IELTS) * Professional licensure (such as the Minnesota Teacher Licensing Exam—MTLE) * Graduate school admission (GRE, GMAT, and again TOEFL or IELTS). Students as young as 12 or 13 can successfully answer many of the ACT Questions of the Day (QOTD) http://www.act.org/qotd/ and SAT QOTD http://sat.collegeboard... read more

It is often examples that make ideas understandable to students and current events can be a good source of examples. Case in point. Today in Wisconsin, the issue of the day is the outcome of the recall elections and problems with the exit polling. As a tutor, the outcome isn’t interesting, but exit polling like all surveys is key to the usefulness of statistics! In fact, it gives a great opportunity to illustrate some of the basic (and non-mathematical) ideas and concepts of statistics — usually the ideas presented at the beginning of most introduction-to-statistics courses. Statistical inferences are grounded in some basic definitions and assumptions (in bold). A population is a defined collection of individuals that we want to know some data about and a sample is a group taken from the population that we are going to actually collect data from (Sullivan, 2010, p. 5; Triola, 2010, p. 4). If we wanted to know the actual data about a population, which is called a parameter,... read more

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