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Print, Script, or Ten Finger Typing?

My first WyzAnt tutoring student was actually signed up to learn handwriting, both print and script. Back then, only "writing" was offered, so it was assumed to include all aspects.

Handwriting, now, is listed under "elementary education", however, back in the day, it was considered a proper business class skill. The better one's handwriting, the higher one was expected to be or to rise in the business world, where power and finance were located.

I grew up in the shadow of that historical approach, inspired by a mother with beautiful script.  It led to some backlash among peers, once I entered the world of medicine, moreso among surgeons in general, but the nurses and other support staff loved how they could quickly, clearly and accurately read my patient care notes and orders.  Some twelve years ago, ethical leaders in the medical world began promoting legible writing to decrease patient care errors. Those who knew me used mine as an example.

It is only rather recently that the pendulum has swung away from developing handwriting skills in general and script in particular.  That pendulum of history is poised to swing back, now.  One reason is that our Founding Fathers wrote in script, as evidenced by the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and other important, historical documents.  Another suggests it helps in the development of eye-hand coordination, though research yet needs to be done.  Personally, I find script ergonomically better than print:  It can be written faster than print while remaining at least as legible -- done correctly, that is.

Granting that ten finger typing has become an important computer-interface skill, and that it, too, teaches dexterity of a sort, there still is no clear reason why a student cannot learn all three:  print, script, and ten-finger typing.  Those of earlier generations (including mine) -- before computers were available or even invented -- successfully accomplished them.

And, to write well in script is to present oneself is a professionally qualified light.