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ADD and ADHD Students in the Classroom

As an individual diagnosed later in life with ADHD (age 20) as well as a college student, I've had to readjust how I look at school as well as my my goals for the future.

My ADD wasn't diagnosed until I reached college because I never had to pay attention in high school to get good grades despite being in advanced classes. It was only in college that school became a challenge. For the first time, I had to start paying attention in class and doing hours of home work each night. This became quite challenging and I noticed a difference in my behavior.

I made a change in my field of study from history to Human Services. A degree in history would have required me to attain a graduate degree if I really wanted a chance at a decent job in the history field. That meant many more years of schooling and a job that might require me to sit behind a desk. As much as I loved history, I did not want to continue to struggle like I was, nor sit behind a desk after graduating. So, I stepped back and evaluated my options.

I knew that I liked working with people, psychology interested me, and I could attain a associate's degree within a year in Human Services. So, Human Services seemed like the perfect field for me. Jobs in this field allow me to work with others, change jobs frequently, and not have to go to school for years if I didn't want too.

The diagnosis of ADHD forever changed my life. I am grateful for that change though. I really enjoy my studies and I am excited to get out and help others who suffer from the disorder and show them they can achieve their goals. I am still in school and am successful at it. I let all my teachers know I do have the disorder so they are aware if I need to get up during long lectures or if I space out for a second it is not due to lack of interest or disrespect rather that is just how my brain functions. I am a big supporter of working with doctors and school resources to help ADD/ADHD children function at the highest levels possible. They just need a different course of action from regular students to achieve maximum learning capabilities in the classroom.