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How Should You Organize Your Speech?

Why organize your speech?

If your speech is organized, you help your audience understand, follow and remember the main ideas of your speech.

Conversely, a disorganized speech quickly frustrates your audience—causing them to immediately tune you out early. Thus, they will hardly remember the main ideas you are trying to convey—and you will have simply wasted your time.

The following is a speech outline for a general speech. (For highly-specialized speeches, such as a persuasive speech using Monroe's Motivated Sequence or a problem—solution speeches, I will post the specific outlines in a later post.)

Speech Title:­­­­_________(Note: Make it Interesting)

I. Introduction

A. Grab Attention immediately: say a bold quote, bold statement, short anecdote, or a physical gesture.

B. State your Thesis (one concise sentence): what you want audience to specifically think, feel or do?

C. Summarized ALL Supporting points

Say Transition (from Introduction to Body)

II. Body

A. State Main Point #1

* Subordinate points #1,2, & 3

1. Supporting material (e.g., example, statistic, visual, testimonial)

Summary of Supporting Point #1
State Transition to point #2

B. State Main Point #2

* Subordinate points #1, #2, & 3

1. Supporting material (e.g., example, statistic, visual, testimonial)

Summary of Main Point #2
State Transition to point #3

C. State Main point #3

* Subordinate points #1,#2, & 3

1. Supporting material (e.g., example, statistic, visual, testimonial)

Summarize All Main points (in this sequence: points #3, 2, & 1)
State Transition from Body to Conclusion

III. Conclusion

A. Restate Thesis (as in the Introduction—or you can paraphrase)
B. Summarize main points (sequence: Main Points #1, #2 #3—as in Introduction—or you can paraphrase)
C. Build-up your energy and enthusiasm to a memorable close (anywhere from 1-3 sentences), such as a bold closing statement (one concise sentence)
If appropriate, your bold closing statement can be in the form of a "call to action" (specific examples: write to your congressman, write to your local newspaper, talk/persuade other people, start believing in yourself, have more faith in other people or God, etc.). A "call to action" is a fantastic way to profoundly interact/connect with your audience/listeners.