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Based on tone, why is it fitting that "The Lamb" is featured in a volume titled, Songs of Innocence?

Question 9
 
The Lamb
 
Little lamb, who made thee?
Does thou know who made thee,
Gave thee life, and bid thee feed
By the stream and o'er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing, woolly, bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice?
Little lamb, who made thee?
Does thou know who made thee?
Little lamb, I'll tell thee;
Little lamb, I'll tell thee:
He is called by thy name,
For He calls Himself a Lamb.
He is meek, and He is mild,
He became a little child.
I a child, and thou a lamb,
We are called by His name.
Little lamb, God bless thee!
Little lamb, God bless thee! The Tyger
 
Tiger, tiger, burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare seize the fire?
And what shoulder and what art
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And, when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand and what dread feet?
What the hammer? what the chain?
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?
When the stars threw down their spears,
And watered heaven with their tears,
Did He smile His work to see?
Did He who made the lamb make thee?
Tiger, tiger, burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry. 
 
 
CAN SOMEONE PLEASE EXPLAIN TO ME WHAT THIS QUESTION IS ASKING ME TO DO?
:)
 
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3 Answers

if i understand what is being asked, this is what i think..
the lamb is often thought as the most innocent animal because its most vulnerable to hunters. the words "tender "and "meek" show the large contrast to the tiger, who is the fearless hunger.
lambs are ofter thought as pure animals and have kind of a religious connection because of that.
so because the lamb is one of the most, if not THE most vulnerable animal that is hunter,.that is why he is put in this. because his innocence to other predators is what causes him to be so easily hunted.
so it is asking what is the lamb have to do with innocence.
 
 
 
1. The lamb does nothing to harm anyone and actually does not have the power or ability.
 
2.  and 3.  meek and mild, softest fur, etc.   The Jews in the Old Testament used to sacrifice lambs - it was part of their belief system that they would give up something innocent for God.  This happened on the Passover-- this was the night in the Old Testament when the Egyptians had taken the Israelites as slaves in Egypt--- none of the plagues that Ramses had contended with had convinced him to let the Israelites free to go back to Palestine. So, the ultimate plague was that the Angel of Death would go over every door-- the Israelites had been told by Moses to sacrifice a lamb and smear the lamb's blood over the doorpost. The Egyptians did not know about this procedure. The Angel of Death would kill the first born son of any home that did not have the lamb's blood on the post. So, Ramses' son was killed and he gave in. This was the first Jewish Passover because the Angel of Death "passed over" the homes of the Israelites and they were saved.  This sacrificial lamb is a foreshadowing of the Lamb of God in the New Testament who  is Jesus.  He was innocent, could not harm anyone, etc. just like the lamb in the Old Testament. But, he was killed anyway, just like the sacrificial lamb was. Jesus became the New Testament sacrificial lamb, but it was promised that all who believe in him (like all those believed Moses and smeared the real lamb's blood on the door) would also be saved.
1. Why does "The Lamb" belong within Songs of Innocence?
2. Observing the text of the poem, how do the characteristics of a lamb express innocence?
3. What is the religious significance of the lamb?

Comments

To clarify, the religious significance of the lamb is, as a sacrifice for sin. The central question of the poem is religious:  "Who made thee?"  So is the author's answer:  "He calls Himself a Lamb." This is a Biblical allusion to Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. Thus the author identifies Christ as Creator and that "He became a little child."
 
yes-- this is what I answered --- the only difference is that I did not mention "sin" because it has become a word with vey negative connotations over the eons-- so I just said that they were saved.  yes the little innocent baby that Jesus was, was analogous to the lamb in the OT

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