Search 72,340 tutors FIND TUTORS
Search for tutors
Ask a question
0 0

Is Ender's Game worth reading?

Tutors, please sign in to answer this question.

4 Answers

Yes, Yes, a million times, Yes! Ender's game is a fantastic sci-fi book that delves into the mind of a tactical genius. I have read the book three or four times and each time I learn something new. The biggest part of this book is that it teaches what it means to be human, not so much by comparing the humans against the invading alien species, "The Buggers", but by analyzing the mind of this one being- Ender. The author of the book, Orson Scott Card, brilliantly gives the reader a chance to look at the world through a whole different perspective. 

Throughout the book, however, (and the rest of the series) is a more subtle theme of racism and genocide. The buggers, while being an invading force, are also an intelligent species. Their mistake was to not realize that the humans were also an intelligent species, because of their differences, until it was too late. The first book ends with the brutal, near-complete destruction of the bugger race. During the course of the story, Ender learns more about them and comes to realize that though they are different, they too deserve a chance to live. This cross-species friendship speaks to the idea that all beings, no matter how different, deserve the basic right to life and the possibility of coexistence. On a simpler scale, no matter what people believe or what they look like, they still deserve respect and the opportunity to participate in the world just as much as the next person.

Yes! Ender's Games and Ender's Shadows are the greatest of series. The story is immensely easy to get into, understand, and get enveloped in. The plot never tires and will continue to surprise you until the very end! The series has undertones of series world issues, such as racism and genocide. 

This is one of those books that will easily find a place in your heart. You will feel what the characters feel and be rooting for them and feeling pain when they are faced with hardship. This book is an easy read and will take no time to get into!

Yes, you should absolutely read Ender’s Game and not just because the movie is coming out this year. This book has been such a foundational piece of literature for me; I read it every single year. It is in my collection of “I will never let it go” novels. There is a reason that it won awards and a reason that it begins a beautifully illustrated series of books. It is great!


Orson Scott Card entranced me with Ender’s Game. He has such an amazing ability to weave a plot that you can never predict and, while doing so, introduce you to the inner workings of his characters. Ender is extremely complex. I am always learning more about his personality every time I read it.


I especially love the character Bean, a “launchy” put under Ender’s command. Bean became so popular and so multifaceted that he was later given a ‘spin-off’, per se. Card wrote the book Ender’s Shadow, a complete retelling of the exact same story, but from Bean’s point of view. By reading them both, you see even more growth and connection in their relationship. Read them both. You will be glad that you did.

If you enjoy them, I highly recommend picking up some of Card’s other series; the Homecoming series is my second favorite and the Alvin Maker series is my third.

Yes, yes, yes indeed! Many of my well-read friends had been recommending that book to me for several years, but I was not really into sci-fi, so I wasn't very interested. Finally, I decided to give it a try. Orson Scott Card is a fantastic writer, eloquent storyteller, excellent at creating and portraying dynamic and interesting characters, and is able to cook up multifaceted plots that evoke intense emotion and communicate profound ideas and philosophies. Unlike many sci-fi authors, his science is only fiction in the sense that the hypothetical scenarios he narrates have not actually occurred, but that is not to say that they are not realistic or possible in the future. He bases much of his fictitious accounts on actual, plausible scientific theories. I quickly devoured the four books following Ender's Game (Xenocide and Speaker of the Dead were both as equally brilliant as their predecessor, which rarely happens.) READ and ENJOY!!!