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As the school year begins to wind down, I have noticed that many of the students I help have begun the journey of signing up for next years classes or, better yet, deciding where they will start the next chapter of their life in college. I began to reminisce on my Senior year of high school and how stressful that year was for me. It was so easy to become overwhelmed by all of the choices that (seemed to be) abruptly placed in front of me: what college should I go to? What should I major in? Should I choose a college close to home? Should I rush? Should I go to a college with all of my friends? Will I absolutely hate it? I ended up choosing the wrong college and transferred twice until I finally ended up a college that I love! I say all of this to jump into the idea of NOT stressing about this time of year. Yes, I did say not to stress. College is a time of change. That change, no matter how terrifying it may seem, will take you on a wonderful journey that no one can plan... read more

To My Future and Current Students, I can't stress enough the IMPORTANCE of ALGEBRA! Of all the mathematics I have taken in my lifetime...BELIEVE ME IT'S BEEN A LOT, ALGEBRA is the only course that is WOVEN into every single course. I was lucky enough that my first mathematics teacher in High School (Mr. Large), turned me from a B student into an A student such that I graduated High School with a 4.0 in mathematics. The one piece of advice he gave me that I will share with you is that...I NEED TO CHECK, DOUBLE CHECK AND TRIPLE CHECK ALL OF MY ANSWERS! Algebra is a required course (prerequisite) for many of your other math courses, but most importantly in your High School career it is MANDATORY in order to be successful in Algebra 2. It may seem silly to learn and master Algebra, however, it is an integral part of every math course you will take after that except some geometry courses. Algebra teaches you how to think, be organized and how to prove your answers by checking... read more

IF I could go back in time and give my younger self some advice on how to be a better student, be more successful in school, life, etc, I would definitely tell myself that being involved in everything comes at a cost. It is better to find a few things that you like to do, do them well and often, than feeling stressed because there is so much on your plate at one time. Being a 'Jack of all Trades' it is natural for me to dip my toes in different waters- all at the same time, but that does not mean that I can give 100% to any of them at that time. While I was able to get good grades (A- average) while in school, I was impressed by how much better I did- and felt about my work- the few times that I scaled back on my activities. Another piece of advice that I wish that I could bestow upon my younger self would be to learn how to speak up in a group setting when someone is not fulfilling their part of an agreement. Now, this said, the best way to do this would be in a tactful... read more

When interviewing a prospective tutor, parents should ask about the tutor's skills and experience, and find out if the tutor truly enjoys teaching. When the tutor feels enthusiastic about the subject, and communicates well, the student has an opportunity to learn to enjoy the subject too. I recommend for parents to observe the first lesson to see the tutor's skills in action, and watch/listen carefully to future lessons when possible, to make sure the tutor has an encouraging, supportive attitude at all times. (Tutors should welcome and respond positively to the child's questions, and NEVER make the child feel "stupid," no matter what.) It is most important to have a safe and quiet place for studying, without distractions. I like to find a quiet table at a library, and work with students there. I welcome suggestions from parents, and I am always looking for ways to improve my teaching skills.

We've finally entered the final week before the March 9th SAT test. All my students have been working very hard, and your dedication is about to pay off. Just remember during this last week to practice the methods I've taught you so that they're second nature come test time. I wouldn't recommend studying at all past Thursday - remember what I've taught you about cramming vs. resting your brain. You're going to do great, so just remember my face - like you've seen countless times in our lessons - reminding you, "Don't. Panic." Here are some other good reminders for test day: -Get plenty of sleep the night before. You need a rested brain to reason properly -Eat a good breakfast that includes some protein. One of the worst feelings is being hungry halfway through the test -Bring three no. 2 pencils, a calculator (you can use a graphing one), your admission ticket, photo ID, and a snack -Don't. Panic. Good luck to you all. I know that you'll all... read more

Did you ever realize that the SLOPE EQUATION is the SAME as the POINT SLOPE FORMULA???? WHAT?!?! Check it out: POINT SLOPE FORMULA is (y-y1)=m(x-x1) SLOPE EQUATION IS m = (y-y1)/(x-x1) Can you see where I'm going with this? -Take the first equation -Divide both sides by (x-x1) -The result is the second equation!!! So now you've shortened your "list of equations to learn" without really doing anything ;)

As members of WyzAnt, we are fully aware of the fact that we are dealing with two different entities when it comes to tutoring. We usually communicate with the clients (parents/guardians) but we tutor the students. Generally speaking, there is almost complete coincidence between these two entities in terms of what direction the tutoring should take. If a particular student is struggling in a class (say, Geometry), and the "client" can tell this from progress reports, report cards, or simple communication with the teacher, then it's pretty obvious that Geometry is the course in question (though what specific sub-topic of Geometry is creating the trouble is not necessarily known). This concept can take something of a twist when preparing a student for a test like the SAT, ACT, ASVAB, GRE, and so on. In the eyes of the "client", from what I have noticed, the student usually needs help on the entire test. The student, on the other hand, having a more in-depth... read more

Hi, I am excited and ready to re-start my tutoring in the Bay Area. I recently moved to San Francisco and started a job recently at Tesla Motors in Palo Alto. I am most available to tutor late in the evenings in the Peninsula, South San Francisco, or on the weekends within a 30 min drive. I am most experienced with high school students and prefer tutoring students at the Algebra and SAT level. I also have an interest in clean energy. I want to work with all students, abilities, and backgrounds - I am willing to work something out to make things work for you! I look forward to working with you! In advance, thanks! Mike

All the major test prep books for the SAT, ACT, and GRE -- published by companies like Kaplan, Princeton Review, Barron's, and Manhattan Test Prep -- are poorly written, conceptually deficient, and, worst of all, riddled with serious errors. Students can't be expected to learn from books that aren't even right! And I don't mean the books are riddled simply with typos, which unfortunately is also true, because they are so poorly edited; I mean they really are riddled with serious conceptual errors. Here's a simple example from the very beginning -- the diagnostic test, of all things! -- of Princeton Review's "1,014 GRE Practice Questions." The problem is on page 24, and the answer key and explanation is on page 38. Not only is their answer wrong; what's worse, their *explanation* is wrong, too! I'll set off the problem by dashes (----) and then add more commentary after. NOTE: The question is a classic GRE "quantitative comparison," so it's hard to... read more

There is an old saying;"We see; yet we are blind" Here is one of my favorite examples::Planck's Radiation LAW. I will not publish it here-you can Google its formula. This law led to the development of Quantum Mechanics The law states every pieces of mass living or non living radiates photons and the frequencies of the photons are determined only by the temperature of the person or object (emitter). It is that simple in it's meaning and allows exact calculations of the frequencies/energies of the photons! A practical trivial application: When a thermometer states that you have a 100 Fdegree you feel ill because you are emitting more photons of energy than you are absorbing at 98.6 F and your metabolism is changing in response to whatever caused the illness.

This is my first time using WyzAnt.I got my first student yesterday. Back home from India and my long journey of loving mathematics made me do a degree in Math. Right from elementary children need good foundation. If we get strong at the basics, we don't need to fear that Math is Hard!! I can make my students feel better and make them get confidence. Practice is the Key. Working more problems, we are going to get familiar with the pattern of questions. I try to encourage students to do more mental math than calculator. Even in my BS Degree in India we never were given Calculator to solve problems. Students can do it!! I am going to soon give links to different topics!! I hope to get more students and I will be happy to guide them to reach their goals.

This area is for students or parents, especially those that are willing to put forth the effort to learn more, and be a better student, to achieve more ;-) To help my students I normally assign them 5 new words a day. Whether they open a physical dictionary or go to the links below, the important thing is that they learn and use new words. Tools ------ dictionary.com - a handy resource with access to multiple dictionaries in one place, especially if you don't have one in the home. worddynamo.com - great website that will send you (after you sign up for free) an email of a quickie multiple choice test of new words. It's a fun way to learn! khanacademy.org - Khan's academy - this is the best resource I've found both for kids and parents. You can sign up your little learner, no matter the age, and they can go out there at any time. - they have all sorts of subjects for free, your child can go at their own pace, and it's a marvelous place to learn with videos online,... read more

All the major test prep books for the SAT, ACT, and GRE -- published by companies like Kaplan, Princeton Review, Barron's, and Manhattan Test Prep -- are poorly written, conceptually deficient, and, worst of all, riddled with serious errors. Students can't be expected to learn from books that aren't even right! And I don't mean the books are riddled simply with typos, which unfortunately is also true, because they are so poorly edited; I mean they really are riddled with serious conceptual errors. Here's a simple example from the Introduction (page 23) to Manhattan's Strategy Guides for the Revised GRE. This passage appears in all eight of Manhattan's strategy guides, so it somehow went unnoticed after at least eight rounds of editing by allegedly "expert" readers and test-takers. See if you can spot the error! ---- "If ab=|a|x|b| which of the following must be true? I. a=b II. a>0 and b>0 III. ab>0 A. II only B. III only C... read more

One way you can be very well prepared to tackle your exam is by taking practice tests. You probably already knew this. However, here is something you might not have known. The best way to do the practice tests is to replicate real testing conditions as much as possible. In other words, wherever you take a practice test, try to make that space feel like the testing environment. This is very much the same philosophy as the "train as you fight" theory used by the military. it does them no good to practice their combat techniques in ideal conditions because they will not have those ideal conditions when they have to implement the techniques. In the same way, taking long breaks and doing only one section per day will not prepare you for the real testing environment. Here are some tips to help you create your own test-taking environment at home: *Get your parents to assist by planning with them when you need your home to be quiet. Make sure siblings are all in agreement... read more

One key to success when you are preparing for your standardized test - or any test, for that matter - is to use visualization exercises. This may seem unscientific, and perhaps it is, but it is a techniques used by athletes, business professionals and successful test takers the world over. Many of my students have benefited from this type of exercise, saying it helped them settle their minds and focus on the test. The technique is to imagine how good it will feel after the test, knowing that you did your very best. Think about walking out of the test center, your head held high, with the knowledge that you did your best. That is a great feeling to imagine, no? In addition, make plans to do something fun after the test. This could be having lunch with friends, going to see a movie, maybe playing a pick-up soccer game, or even just relaxing. Whatever it is you do to celebrate, make concrete plans to do that after the test. This way, you will be looking forward to the test... read more

Now is the time I receive a lot of questions from prospective students and current students about the SAT. So here are my steps to achieve success with the SAT. 1. With any goal, you want to look at goal completion and move backward. With that I mean, say you want to take the SAT test on May 4, 2013, move back at least 3 months and that is the time you should start prepping for the test. In this example, you will need to commence your studying by February 1. 2. Go to http://www.collegeboard.org, create a profile and sign up to take the test. Take a tour within the collegeboard website, as they have some great resources. 3. Did you purchase the official SAT study guide? You can purchase at Amazon http://www.amazon.com/The-Official-SAT-Study-Guide/dp/0874478529/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357660680&sr=8-1&keywords=sat+book or through the collegeboard website. 4. Take one of the practice tests in the back of the SAT book. That will give you a baseline idea... read more

How do you decide? Well there is a KEY piece of information that most students/parents don't consider because: (1) they don't know about it, and (2) it's definitely counter-intuitive, if not downright irrational. And what is this critical, missing nugget of knowledge? Why it's "SUPER SCORING," also known as "SAT® Score-Use Practices." Super scoring comes in six delectable flavors: 1. Highest Section Scores Across Test Dates — Version 1 (Highest M, CR, W) 2. Highest Section Scores Across Test Dates — Version 2 (Highest M, CR, W) 3. Single Highest Test Date — Version 1 (Sum of M+CR+W) 4. Single Highest Test Date — Version 2 (Sum of M+CR+W) 5. All SAT® Scores Required for Review and the ever popular 6. Contact Institution for Information What does all of this gobbledygook mean? It means that a student applying to my Alma Mater (Columbia University), which uses "Highest Section Scores Across Test Dates... read more

What a way to start off the New Year! First I met with a student for US History and Living Environment. She is taking the Regents exams in three weeks. When I first met with her, Cee had a fear of taking exams, and was very nervous. She struggled with understanding both subjects; the Historical Events and dates, as well as the vocabulary words for Biology. Her next struggles were understanding and answering the document based questions for US History and the short responses for LE. Now she answers them much more confidently and accurately, and has even improved in writing her document based and thematic essays for US History. I am so proud of her and is certain that she will pass both Regents exams. Then I met with my grade 4 student for Math, English Language Art and Science. He has gone from scoring 31% to 83% on his practice science exam. He is much more confident with doing Math and ELA assignments. I am so proud of him. Then it was on to my grade 6 Math student. When... read more

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