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The holidays are almost upon us - school will be out soon - and parents and students are looking at a 2-4 week hiatus from the regular routine of school work.  What happens to all of the knowledge and skills learned from school and tutoring during those weeks? Well, having been a high school principal for years, as well as a classroom teacher, my experience is that students often will not read on their own, review math on their own, or if in an AP class "read ahead" on their own.  If you have tutors in the educational profession, we also have that time off and our lesson times can be flexible - so instead of all of those late afternoon, early evening, or weekend appointments, most of us can now meet with our students in the morning or afternoon. So, what would your student gain from tutoring in the winter break? 1.  Weekly reinforcement of knowledge and skills  already... read more

One topic which can be transformational for students preparing for standardized testing, especially logical-mathematical students who are underperforming on the writing SAT, is formally learning English grammar.  A large proportion of writing MC questions in particular focus on the sequence of tenses, and tense sequence errors or unintentional tense shifts can greatly harm submitted writing.  The English language does not have a "past tense".  It has multiple past tenses which are non-identical and which all have their uses.  Working with a tutor on grammar can be a great help to the student who is not well served by whole-language and literature-centric approaches to English class (i.e. the students most likely to seek SAT verbal but not math tutoring in the first place).

Okay, guys. I hate to do this, but I need to put on my teacher hat for a moment. (I don’t think teachers actually wear hats, but I’m sure you’re picking up what I’m putting down.) Here’s the thing: YOUR GRAMMAR AND SPELLING IN YOUR COLLEGE APPLICATION ESSAY MUST, MUST, MUST BE PRACTICALLY PERFECT IN EVERY WAY! You may be rolling your eyes and saying, “What’s a little mix-up between ‘there’ and ‘their’ between friends?” While I don’t think your entire acceptance hinges on one spelling error, I do know that mistakes cast a shadow on your application. For example, if your transcript says that you’ve taken Honors English since freshman year but your essay has several grammatical errors, then an admissions officer might assume that either your grades were inflated or your mom was giving you a little too much help on those final papers. Don’t give the admissions department a single reason to doubt your school smarts. What can you do to perfect your essay? Start with... read more

English Composition: for many, it is a course that breeds anxiety and procrastination. Students often feel like they are at the mercy of red ink wielding professors. They squiggle notes about unity, clarity, and transitions in the margins of what you thought was a well crafted essay. You may find yourself on the receiving end of a big fat “F” even if your essay has perfect spelling and grammar. How does this happen? What mysterious criteria are at play here? What does your professor want from you anyway? Rubrics: Unlocking the Mystery Well, this might surprise you, but your professor is not assigning arbitrary letter grades based on whether or not they like you or your essay. Your professor is actually measuring your essay against a standard set by the college. This standard usually takes the form of a rubric: a tool used to assess the quality of individual components in a college essay. These components include how well you address the purpose and audience... read more

Philosophy of Education for M.J. T. To me the purpose of education is threefold: (1) provide students with a basis of knowledge, (2) teach students how to reason so that they can continue their education throughout their lives, and (3) instill in them a life-long excitement about and love of learning. Students must acquire a basis of knowledge, a framework on which to sort out and understand how various aspects of information in any subject area fit together to make the whole picture of where we have been and where we are going as a civilization. Science affects philosophy which affects the arts … ad infinitum. Nothing exists in a vacuum-sealed box. All knowledge is recursive and intertwined - reaches out and affects many areas outside the discipline in which it begins. I liken this basis of knowledge to a needlepoint tapestry mesh framework. The threads of different strands of information are worked in at various points. In some way every thread touches every... read more

So as a college student, I write a lot of papers (and I mean a lot!)  I've technically been writing college papers for five years now so I've learned a few tricks and tools when I work with vocabulary that I'd like to pass along.  I've had professors give me handouts on their" do's and don'ts".  I've included the best of them.  Some of these may work for you, some of these may not.  Take or leave what you want. When I am writing a paper I always have open on my web browser dictionary.reference.com Why?  Because sometimes I want to check that I am using a word correctly.  The slightest misspelling can change the meaning of a word to something totally different and you don't want to have point deducted from a paper for something that is easily corrected.  If you are even slightly unsure, check it!  You can even check on the speaker button so it says the word out loud and you can compare it to the word you are... read more

If you are homeschooling your children, as you know, this can be overwhelming sometimes. I can help design lessons in writing, English, grammar, public speaking, research and related areas. For first-time clients, I will be flexible with my rate. Review my profile at WyzAnt and let me know what questions you have - would love to help! Good teaching, Tim N.

Although learning is an awesome thing, it can be a difficult and frustrating journey for many students. This difficulty, however, is often times quite normal although most feel it means that a child may not be able to learn or that he/she is so frustrated that learning is no longer taking place. This is where the experienced tutor steps in; for frustration in learning is a part of the learning itself. I have taught and tutored many students and have seen first hand how this frustration can leave some students, and their parents, feeling helpless and hopeless. But there is ALWAYS Hope!!! What they have failed to realize is that as the brain learns difficult concepts, it can only take in parts at a time, little parts at a time. So although it may seem no learning is taking place, it actually is, just in smaller segments. In fact, the most frustration comes right before a new concept is achieved. This is when most give up. Had they stayed focused for perhaps one or two more... read more

Following are a few testimonials that have been provided by people who have seen and/or benefited from our language teaching skills and experience. Bovic L. taught French at the University of Indianapolis in 2004. It is my recollection that he did a very admirable job. He is a native speaker of French who has an engaging style and who is very interested in the success of his students. I might add that my wife studied with Bovic and was very pleased with his classes. He is a conscientious instructor who can adapt his teaching approach to reflect his students' learning styles. In summary, I believe that Bovic L. is an excellent teacher. Daniel B., Special Assistant to the Provost,University of Indianapolis I was Principal of Fall Creek Valley Middle School in Indianapolis/Indiana, when Bovic L. was a French teacher at the school. Bovic was a very competent teacher. He planned and delivered engaging lessons. He had excellent classroom management. Bovic was able to get... read more

For parents who are trying to do any of the following: 1. Engage your child in reading 2. Increase your child's reading skills (fluency, comprehension, rhythm, expression, tempo, etc.) 3. Increase your child's language acquisition, vocabulary, grammar skills, and spelling skills This blog post is for you!!! There are some really unique ways to help your child become a "reader." I myself wasn't a "reader" until about the age of 10. Up to that point, though I loved books and collected books and asked for books for birthdays/holidays, I was not a reading self-starter. However, I loved being read TO! At the age of 6, I took a great interest in Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little House" books. Not only, was I fascinated with the time period (late 1800's), I also found a kindred spirit of sorts in Laura. She stood up for things in which she believed strongly, she was stubborn, and she was short! I found a heroine that was very much like... read more

Hello! Thank you for visiting my site! I have 8 years of language teaching experience. I taught for 7 years at Princeton University and 1 year at the University of Notre Dame. It is truly a joy for me to help people reach their academic and personal goals. Please contact me as soon as possible to inquire about scheduling a tutoring session with me. I specialize in language arts, particularly Spanish, French, and English. I also have experience tutoring people of all ages, and helping them prepare for standardized tests. I look forward to hearing from you soon! Best regards, Valerie

My students and I are celebrating my first month with WyzAnt! Although I have tutored extensively in the past, these past 30 days with WyzAnt have been the most seamless tutoring experience so far. I am loving getting connected with students all over the five boroughs, as well as Westchester! Tutoring is an excellent way to get out and see the City. I've met with students in small coffee shops, huge bookstores, the New York Public Library, and my own cozy study space in my Upper East Side apartment. I have students of all ages, and they all have one thing in common: they are looking toward a bright, grammatically perfect future. :-)

If you had asked my middle school students to describe our class routines, you might have thought I was their English teacher, not Social Studies. As a teacher and tutor, I’ve tried to pass on a legacy for the love of reading to my students. I often tell them, “If you can read, you can teach yourself anything.” In this article, I will give you some tips on how to get your children to read more, and more often. It’s Not Magic! Occasionally, parents visited my classroom to ask, “How do you do it?” They were usually referring to the success of my Friday Silent Reading routine. Each fall, I explained the importance of literacy to my students and said that practice is best way to improve reading skills. I told them that I expected them to bring a book of their choice to class every day, to read it if they finished all the day’s scheduled activities I’d given them, and that the first 20 minutes of class every Friday was reserved for sustained silent reading. Parents... read more

This Spring and Summer, why not invest in yourself or your child? Effective written communication is key to success in the competitive academic and career markets. Get help with Getting Started with Writing, Discovering Writing Topics, Finding Focus Responding to Writing Assignments Reading for Comprehension and Understanding - Retaining Key Concepts, Theme, and more ... and, of course, that always challenging concept of Grammar. I teach Grammar as Tools ... not Rules. Looking forward to hearing from you and hearing about your tutoring needs. See my profile for more information and my Subject Qualifications. - Tim published writer & poet, teacher, tutor

I learned in my human development class that babies learn through repetition = Rote memory You may have also witnessed the ease with which the ABC's were learned. Mary Had a Little Lamb? Twinkle Twinkle? It is easier to commit something to memory through a song. Why is it so easy to remember that annoying tune on the radio? To better memorize - Words - Phrases - Rules (Grammatical, mathematical etc) Try putting it to a simple song tune. Ex My 2 year old learned how to spell his name BINGO style. L-O-G-A-N.

Do the terms "preposition," "verb," "article," and "modal verb" sometimes stump you? Typically, students are taught the word "preposition" in 1st grade. I don't know about you, but I'm pretty sure that if I had seen that long word at the top of a worksheet in 1st grade, I would have skipped right over it, coding "preposition" as a long word that simply did not fit in my schema of the world. Fast forward to middle, high school, and college, and I see that many native speakers often find one or more grammatical device or structure challenging. Grammar lessons learned in elementary school can easily slip from one's mind, leaving students to struggle when applying their skills to essay writing, earning them phrases such as "wrong modifier!" "run-on!" and "awkward!" splattered in red ink all over their graded assignments.   It is one thing to not remember rules of grammar... read more

I love sandwiches. In fact, to say I love sandwiches would be an understatement. Sandwiches are a staple for me. I occasionally like to buy them from a deli or bakery, as it’s important to me to experience the work of a fellow sandwich connoisseur; however, I do spend a great deal of time making them in my own kitchen. I like to use a variety of breads – dark Jewish rye, croissant, focaccia, rosemary olive oil. The choices are endless, but once I’m finally able to decide on what type of crust I’d like, I’m usually much faster at choosing the meat and cheese. I like to keep it simple. Honey ham, bacon, grilled chicken, or herb turkey. If I’m feeling fancy, I’ll pull the Havarti cheese out of the refrigerator. If I’m feeling ordinary, I’ll choose pepper jack. Sometimes I’ll add banana peppers or jalapeños if I’m feeling especially risqué. And then there’s the ultimate question: romaine lettuce or spinach? Both are healthy for you, but you usually don’t get the crisp texture... read more

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