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     Writing and Reading Arts are recursive processes. That is they constantly impact and influence one another. The process of writing has not changed. It consists of seven basic steps: Pre-write, Rough Draft, Revise, Response Group, Edit, Teacher Conference, and Publish, grade, celebrate! The difference then is how the teacher uses strategies to impart this knowledge to the student. Practice does not make perfect, but perfect practice makes perfect! It is up to the teacher to find out what modalities, the student best learns in, and present material in that way. At the same time teachers must have students work on areas of learning they are weak in, because higher education requires you be a thinker that learns from stimuli that is physical or even total physical response, for special needs, (kinesthetic), visual, auditory, graphophonic. The teacher models for the student to self monitor. Many do this by talking to themselves and asking themselves questions... read more

Good morning, lovely learners! Time to rise and shine and, well, learn.   Today's post is the last in three I've done on Aristotle's Rhetoric Trifecta. We've done pathos--persuasion by emotion--and logos--argument by logic--but now it's time to end this with a final powerhouse punch: ethos.   Ethos is persuasion by authority. A little strange, sure, but if you tilt your head and squint your eyes a little, you'll see why I think this is the most important strategy of the three.   See, you can have the cutest, big-eyed puppies campaigning for you, and dozens of scientists out spouting statistics and studies, but unless you yourself come across as someone who knows what they're talking about--as a reliable, trustworthy source of information--no one will listen to you.  So appearing to your audience, whether in writing or in person, as someone worth paying attention to must be a top priority.   Let's take this blog and my... read more

Good morning, writing minions! It’s time for more lessons from a dead white dude. In my last post, I discussed the power of pathos as one of three primary rhetorical techniques Aristotle developed to persuade an audience—techniques that still work today, whether for campaign speeches, college essays, or talking Mom and Dad into a later curfew. Today, it’s time to talk about logos, or the logical argument. And to explain it well, allow one of my favorite television characters of all time take the stage: Abed Nadir, of Dan Harmon’s Community. Abed, a socially awkward young man in community college, offers a piece of chocolate to the female members of his study group whenever they become agitated. This goes unnoticed until his agenda book is opened and the study group sees the calendar marked on certain dates with the female members’ names. It’s alarmingly obvious that he’s been charting the women’s menstrual cycles. Horrified, they ask Abedwhy... read more

I have a thing for old, dead guys. Sure, they're a little dusty, but you just wipe off their tomb--er, tome--and you'll see they can breathe fresh life into your writing.   There's this particular old dude Aristotle whose advice I've taken to heart for myself. He used to be a tutor himself to Alexander the Great in ancient Egypt. He taught biology, physics, geography, oration, and--most importantly for us!--rhetoric.   There's a fancy definition for rhetoric, but the basic idea is this: There're a series of ways to sway an audience to your own opinion and view, be they in person or on paper. The art--and yes, it's an art--of doing this well is called rhetoric.   According to Aristotle, there were three ways to go about convincing people that your way is the right way. He called them "logos," "pathos," and "ethos." You can use one, two, or even all three in combination. In order to use them, however, you... read more

Many students have a fear of learning a foreign language.  Instead of approaching acquiring a new tongue as an exciting challenge, many approach it with the question "Why do we have to learn this?"  Learning a foreign language can be a wonderful experience.  Here a few of my "Dos and Don'ts" when approaching foreign language learning.   DO keep an open mind and be positive about learning something new. DO recognize the similarities of your native language and the new language that you are learning. DO review your notes from class everyday and practice at home. DO find a language/study buddy in your language class. DO think about your future and how a new language is going to benefit you with your future goals. DON'T be negative. DON'T be prejudice about a foreign language and its culture based on stereotypes. DON'T stop trying even when there are words that you do not understand or there is a chapter that is... read more

Proofreading and editing one's own paper for a high school or college English course can be challenging. Sometimes one just needs a second pair of eyes. A tutor will often see the weaknesses in a writing assignment and point them out to a student. Like any teacher, making red marks on a student's paper doesn't necessarily help a student improve his or her writing skills. Working side by side, one-on-one with an English tutor will encourage you to take what you already know and apply it to your assignments. Writing is a skill that is necessary in all disciplines, not just the humanities. Science majors must write well to explain laboratory experiments and correctly compose reports. Biology, Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology, and Chemistry courses in college will require one to write either lab reports or essays, and possibly both. Pre-med students need writing skills just as much as pre-law students. Whatever the discipline, being able to properly convey your ideas, thoughts,... read more

Philosophy of Education for M.J. T. To me the purpose of education is threefold: (1) provide students with a basis of knowledge, (2) teach students how to reason so that they can continue their education throughout their lives, and (3) instill in them a life-long excitement about and love of learning. Students must acquire a basis of knowledge, a framework on which to sort out and understand how various aspects of information in any subject area fit together to make the whole picture of where we have been and where we are going as a civilization. Science affects philosophy which affects the arts … ad infinitum. Nothing exists in a vacuum-sealed box. All knowledge is recursive and intertwined - reaches out and affects many areas outside the discipline in which it begins. I liken this basis of knowledge to a needlepoint tapestry mesh framework. The threads of different strands of information are worked in at various points. In some way every thread touches every... read more

I am a native English speaking tutor with UCF writing center and multilingual multicultural center work experience.  Originally from Orlando, I have lived in Central Florida for most of my life.  Not only do I know the area, I have varied work experience and a background which enables me to tutor all ages.  My youngest student was a kindergartener and my oldest student was a lawyer from Russia.  I love meeting new people and learning about other cultures.  I traveled extensively during middle and high school years because my father worked for a major airline at the Orlando International Airport.  My relatives are scattered across the United States and Europe.  German is my second language, although I did not learn German until I was in high school.  If you are interested in improving your writing skills, please review my public profile on this website.  If you have any questions, please drop me a line in my Inbox through the... read more

So as a college student, I write a lot of papers (and I mean a lot!)  I've technically been writing college papers for five years now so I've learned a few tricks and tools when I work with vocabulary that I'd like to pass along.  I've had professors give me handouts on their" do's and don'ts".  I've included the best of them.  Some of these may work for you, some of these may not.  Take or leave what you want. When I am writing a paper I always have open on my web browser dictionary.reference.com Why?  Because sometimes I want to check that I am using a word correctly.  The slightest misspelling can change the meaning of a word to something totally different and you don't want to have point deducted from a paper for something that is easily corrected.  If you are even slightly unsure, check it!  You can even check on the speaker button so it says the word out loud and you can compare it to the word you are... read more

Five tips for surviving the summer slump! 1. Spend time getting physical exercise - it keeps the brain active. 2. Read as much as possible - choose books that interest you, not just what might be on your school's summer reading list. 3. WRITE - write a journal about what you did during the summer, places you went, reflections on books you read. 4. Limit the time you spend on computer games. 5. HAVE FUN.

The most obvious answer is cost. If a tutor charges the same rate for one or four students, it becomes cheaper per hour as you increase students and share the costs with other families. It is often believed a tutor is best when working 1:1 with a student. In some instances it is well worth the time and money to have 1:1 tutoring and sometimes it is appropriate for students to study and do school work in small groups. What is not obvious is the dynamics of small group tutoring. In a variety of circumstances it is invaluable for students to learn how to study “what needs to be studied”. The acts of independence and self regulating behavior have far reaching benefits. Groups need to learn to share and take turns. This seems simple and yet there is the underlying tendency to allow the ‘smart one’ in the group to carry the burden of work. Assuming each student is in the class and has a different point of view/observation about what is happening in class, they should share... read more

So you are halfway through summer and you suddenly decided you are tired of going to the pool, or your usual crowd has become lame, and you are starting to wish it was time to go back to school already. What do you do? Your parents keep hassling you - asking you, "What's wrong?" All you can say is that you are bored! Step #1- Visit your local library - not online - in person. Check the library activities board for upcoming events for your age (adults too). Ask the librarian to help you find how to books of your favorite subject area- or a new area that you think could someday be added to your list of favorites. Some examples of books my children used to check out include: the basics of Karate (and other martial arts), books about drama, foreign language learning, how to make the best paper airplanes, how to draw cartoons, and how to do skateboard tricks. There are hundreds of books on subjects ranging from sports to arts and crafts, and from do it yourself handyman... read more

“If you want to become a better reader, you need to become a better writer. If you want to become a better writer, you need to become a better reader.” Reading and writing are integral parts of one another. Ask any published author what he or she wrote about and he or she will be quick to tell you most of their ideas came from what they’ve read. Literature, in whatever form, is about life. What do writers write about? Life. They write about what they know, what they’ve experienced or what someone they know has experienced, or how they imagine something happening. Whether its fiction or non-fiction, writing is about the experiences, people, places, and events we encounter in every day life or about what we imagine the characters we create or encounter experience and their perspective of those experiences. “Life” itself is a very broad topic – overwhelming is more like it. Think about it. Over the course of 23 hours and 59 minutes and 59 seconds, what do you experience?... read more

If you are homeschooling your children, as you know, this can be overwhelming sometimes. I can help design lessons in writing, English, grammar, public speaking, research and related areas. For first-time clients, I will be flexible with my rate. Review my profile at WyzAnt and let me know what questions you have - would love to help! Good teaching, Tim N.

Summer is an awesome time to be a student - free time and less stress can help you clear your thoughts and really establish your goals. Regardless of age or reason, there is no better time than summer to really hone your skills. If you'll be applying to college in the coming school year, now is the time to really set your goals in stone and get working on those applications. Personal statements take time to craft and make perfect, and if you haven't caught on by now, let me repeat it: there is no time like the present to get started. The earlier you begin planning, the more prepared you will be when the application deadlines start rolling in, and ultimately, that means you will be less stressed and more likely to succeed. Or, if you're just someone looking to get better at a particular skill, you can think of summer as an "off season," of sorts. You have a ton of skilled professionals at your disposal to help you sharpen your presenting skills or communication... read more

Following are a few testimonials that have been provided by people who have seen and/or benefited from our language teaching skills and experience. Bovic L. taught French at the University of Indianapolis in 2004. It is my recollection that he did a very admirable job. He is a native speaker of French who has an engaging style and who is very interested in the success of his students. I might add that my wife studied with Bovic and was very pleased with his classes. He is a conscientious instructor who can adapt his teaching approach to reflect his students' learning styles. In summary, I believe that Bovic L. is an excellent teacher. Daniel B., Special Assistant to the Provost,University of Indianapolis I was Principal of Fall Creek Valley Middle School in Indianapolis/Indiana, when Bovic L. was a French teacher at the school. Bovic was a very competent teacher. He planned and delivered engaging lessons. He had excellent classroom management. Bovic was able to get... read more

For parents who are trying to do any of the following: 1. Engage your child in reading 2. Increase your child's reading skills (fluency, comprehension, rhythm, expression, tempo, etc.) 3. Increase your child's language acquisition, vocabulary, grammar skills, and spelling skills This blog post is for you!!! There are some really unique ways to help your child become a "reader." I myself wasn't a "reader" until about the age of 10. Up to that point, though I loved books and collected books and asked for books for birthdays/holidays, I was not a reading self-starter. However, I loved being read TO! At the age of 6, I took a great interest in Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little House" books. Not only, was I fascinated with the time period (late 1800's), I also found a kindred spirit of sorts in Laura. She stood up for things in which she believed strongly, she was stubborn, and she was short! I found a heroine that was very much like... read more

Hello! Thank you for visiting my site! I have 8 years of language teaching experience. I taught for 7 years at Princeton University and 1 year at the University of Notre Dame. It is truly a joy for me to help people reach their academic and personal goals. Please contact me as soon as possible to inquire about scheduling a tutoring session with me. I specialize in language arts, particularly Spanish, French, and English. I also have experience tutoring people of all ages, and helping them prepare for standardized tests. I look forward to hearing from you soon! Best regards, Valerie

One of the more frustrating things about tutoring is when students or their parents want to treat tutoring like a quick fix. In other words, sometimes they want to meet the night before a test and cram for said test in hopes of getting a better grade. On the surface, this problem might work, but it treats the symptoms rather than the root of the problem. If you're going to take the time to invest in a tutor, then here are a couple of suggestions. First, try to catch the problem early. If you (or your child) is struggling in a subject, get help right away. Don't wait until you (or your child) feels that overwhelming feeling that comes when one is completely lost in information. The sooner a tutor can get involved, the better the tutor can help a student to stay on track. Work with your tutor to adopt a thorough approach to the subject. It is not enough to learn the facts of a subject, but also to learn the reasons behind those facts. If you want to do well in a subject,... read more

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