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As a former camp director (references available), and as a published writer and college English instructor, I can customize a reading and writing group to engage your teen this summer. This will keep them in a safe environment, and they will be learning and practicing their writing and analytical skills for future high school and college success. I will design a custom plan and schedule for your needs. Why not contact another parent and see if their teens would be interested. We can select some appropriate books together, and I will design discussion questions and writing exercises for the workshop meetings. We can decide on public meeting places: libraries, coffee shops, etc. Contact me here through WyzAnt and I will create a special package rate for my services, especially if you introduce additional students that might be interested. There is no obligation to discuss this idea. Please e-mail me if you have questions or to discuss further! -... read more

I always find remarks about anything concerning money interesting. A recent poll asked the reasons for tutoring, and one of the responses possible was to "maximize my income". Tutoring, like most aspects of education, isn't about the money. Sure, there are people who make quite a bit of money here, in relative terms. But is there any concern about the product? Many people here are not teachers or trained educators; so, I presume that this is (a) either your primary source of income, or, most likely, (b) you are a full-time employee and this is a second job to pick up additional money. I am also somewhat surprised at the backgrounds of some of the tutors, but that is their business.

Greetings current and prospective tutees and families!   Today I would like to share with you an optional part of my tutoring services--working with your student's teacher. Since the teacher is the one who works with your student on a daily basis, his or her insight and input regarding students' performance, learning styles, strengths, and weaknesses can be extremely valuable. As a tutor, I would love to be able to work with your student's teacher in order to quickly gain a broader picture of your student's needs and how I can effectively address those needs.   If you are interested in having me work with your student's teacher, let me know. I'd be glad to discuss goals for adding the teacher into the mix in order to maximize our tutoring success!   Happy Learning!   -Sarah J.

As a student, the one learning resource that you can always keep with you 24 hours a day is your textbook. And that makes the book your best friend, because it is always there to help you learn more. But some friends are hard to understand. Some don't speak English well, some whisper, and some are moody. So you might need an interpreter sometimes.   That's where your tutor comes in. The tutor gives you one-on-one attention, taking you step-by-step through the book to help you understand what the book is trying to tell you and what the book is asking you to do. Tutors slowly and patiently take you through the examples, even when your teacher can't.   Use your tutors to explain your lessons in ways that simplify the concepts and clarify ideas. Tutors can help break down problem-solving procedures for you in small, digestible steps. You'd be surprised how much easier things can be when someone skilled and patient gives you individual attention and shares... read more

A few good questions and thoughtful answers can make tutoring an actual learning process. This is substantially different from cramming sessions, emergency sessions to pass a class and homework 'completion'. I ask parents and students (where it is age/capacity appropriate) to explain their goals and expected outcomes. This question serves three significant purposes for the student and myself. (1) Is the student interested in learning or in getting by? (2) Does the student have commitment/perseverance or are they looking for an easy out? (3) Setting realistic expectations for outcomes. If the student is not interested in learning and will not be committed, I am not the correct tutor for the job. There are tutors who specialize in cram sessions. Setting expectations appropriately prevents surprises from happening to ardent wishes. An example of expectation setting is explaining to parents the following examples and being clear on this information: (http://talk... read more

The problem with most word problems is that they're not written by writers. They're written by math people. :-)  Which means that it's not always clear what they're asking you to do.   Every math problem is about totals and pieces. You either have a number of different pieces and need to do something with them to figure out a total; or you have a total and some pieces and need to find out the missing pieces.   Sometimes you even have pieces you don't realize you had. For example, if a problem tells you that Mike "saved 20%," you also know that he SPENT 80%, even though it's not written.   So, start the solution to any word problem with a blank equation. Leave everything blank--no numbers, no signs, just empty spaces.   And draw a chart or simple sketch to help you visualize what you have and what you're missing. As you complete parts of the drawing, you'll be able to fill in pieces of your equation. (You can even lightly... read more

Is it possible to overstudy for an exam?  Yes.  Unfortunately, I see it happen way too often.  There is a point when studying can begin to have diminishing returns.  (My Economics students should understand that concept!)     I'm a marathon runner, and one important practice that marathon runners follow is a taper period.  It works like this:  In the months that lead up to a marathon, the training intensity and length of runs slowly builds.  About two weeks before the marathon, the runner has built up to one long run a week...perhaps 18 to 22 miles.  However, during the final two weeks before the marathon, the runs become shorter, tapering down to just a few miles a day before the big race.   This concept works well for studying as well.  If a student can maintain a disciplined study routine during the semester, then the few days before the final exam should be shorter and shorter "refresher" study... read more

Rather than droning on about each subject in math at this point, I'm going to make a shift. I'm currently engaged in a conversation with a friend, and my most recent reply to him expresses my opinion on how math is being taught today:   ...The beauty of math is something that I have seen most of my life, and it stands in my mind as one of my fundamental motivations for studying math. As a person with that emotional tie to math, I realize that many students would find it difficult to identify with my assertion that math is beautiful. As a result, I often take a stance that might be a little self-protective, and offer an answer that seems to be weaker but more universal. In short, some aspects of math are of universal benefit, such as the skill of basic calculation, or the benefits of mental exercise. There are some benefits that apply only to a portion of the population, such as the ability to factor polynomials, or to find missing sides of triangles... read more

Schedule for SAT Crash Course: Lesson 1: Test Basics, Sentence Completions (singles and doubles), Short Paragraphs Lesson 2: Long Passages (Narrative, Expository, Persuasive) Lesson 3: Double Passages, Difficult Passages, Essay Lesson 4: Grammar Basics (Voice, Parallelism, Continuity, Conciseness) Lesson 5: Verb and Pronoun Errors Lesson 6: Modifier, Comparative, Idiom, Confused Word Errors SAT English Basics Reading Section: (70 minutes) Sentence Completions 19 Questions Worth 30% Reading Passages 48 Questions Worth 70% Writing Section: (60 minutes)  Grammar: Worth 70% Identifying Sentence Errors 18 Questions Improving Sentences 25 Questions  Improving Paragraphs 6 Questions   Essay (25 minutes) Graded from 2-12 Worth 30% 1 point given for each question answered correctly. -¼ point for each question answered incorrectly. No points for unanswered questions. Tips... read more

Schedule for ACT Crash Course: Lesson 1: Test Basics, ACT Reading Strategies Lesson 2: ACT Reading Question Types Lesson 3: Difficult ACT Reading Passages Lesson 4: Punctuation and Sentence Structure Errors (Basics, Commas, Apostrophes, Run-Ons) Lesson 5: Grammar Errors (Verb, Pronoun, Modifier, Comparison, Coordination) Lesson 6: Rhetorical Skills (Strategy, Organization, Style) and Essay ACT English/Reading Basics: Scored out of 36   Reading Section: (35 minutes) 40 Questions 4 Passages Prose Natural Science Humanities Social Studies English Section: (45 Minutes) 75 Questions Usage/Mechanics Punctuation 13% Grammar/Usage 16% Sentence Structure 24% Rhetorical Skills Rhetorical Strategy 16% Rhetorical Organization 15% Rhetorical Style 16% Writing Section: (30 minutes) 1 essay prompt Scored out of 12 and combined with English score 1 point given for each... read more

1) You can have fun and be silly, but still increase focus on the subject   When I taught piano lessons to a 5-year-old girl, I would start off by asking her to find the weirdest, funniest sound that she could find on the keyboard, and then ask her to play the song she had practiced for that week in that sound! She always would laugh and make faces, but it made the repetition of practicing the same song over and over less monotonous and more fun! This would start our lessons off on a great note, and they would be more of a game or exploration of music than just a class.   2) Take a snack break     After about 30-45 minutes of studying the same subject, it can get tiring and hard to focus. Our brains need a break! Stopping 30 minutes into a tutoring session to have a quick snack or drink can really help to give your mind the rest it needs to be able to refocus and start refreshed after the break!   3) Talk about your... read more

I am new to WyzAnt, however I have been a teacher of English composition and literature for over a decade.  I am excited about meeting area students and guiding on them journey of education.    The core of my philosophy is that everyone is on a journey -- each of us can continue to grow and develop as learners, as writers, and as thinkers.  My job is to discover where you are and assist you in moving to the next step in your journey.  In doing this, our journeys overlap for a season -- you learn from me and I learn from you.  We learn and grow together.    So, if you are a student or a tutor, I look forward to learning with you. 

I am new to WyzAnt, however I have been a teacher of English composition and literature for over a decade.  I am excited about meeting area students and guiding on them journey of education.    The core of my philosophy is that everyone is on a journey -- each of us can continue to grow and develop as learners, as writers, and as thinkers.  My job is to discover where you are and assist you in moving to the next step in your journey.  In doing this, our journeys overlap for a season -- you learn from me and I learn from you.  We learn and grow together.    So, if you are a student or a tutor, I look forward to learning with you. 

Definitions: der Geist (noun), depending on context = ghost, spirit, essence, mind, wit, an alcoholic drink / Famous ones: der Heilige Geist = the Holy Spirit---one of three parts; Mephistopheles = version of Satan ---„Ich bin der Geist, der stets verneint!“ (Goethe: Faust); „Weltseele zu Pferde“ = Napoléon Bonaparte, French military and political leader---Embodies and exemplifies Hegels concept of the world spirit. (Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, German philosopher) /   Be:   geistreich, geistreicher, am geistreichsten = ingenious, more ingenious, most ingenious / Be wary of so-called:   Himbeergeist = type of German Schnaps; Kartoffeln mit Geist = unknown ;) ; Zeitgeist = spirit of the age;   „Etwas Bornierteres als den Zeitgeist gibt es nicht. Wer nur die Gegenwart kennt, muß verblöden.“ (Hans Magnus Enzensberger)      

Howdy!   As someone who just graduated from a Master's program, I've been through quite a few classes in my time, and few things are harder to learn from than boring lessons. It's important that a lesson be "engaging", but that's just fancy speak for...fun! Here are my five tips for keeping lessons fun no matter the subject or student.   1 - Always be yourself! A lot of teachers, especially new ones, feel that they need to fit a model of what a teacher is, does, and looks like. Now, of course we all must be professional and driven teachers, but that doesn't mean we have to be cookie-cutter teachers! I am an Aggie, a loud and proud graduate of the 2013 undergraduate class at Texas A&M University. If you've heard of the school, you know we're not short on pride, tradition, and character! I bring that to everything I do. My greetings are "howdy"s, and my students always greet them with grins. Be your own unique teacher, and your... read more

Do some of your students lack focus? Does pent up energy keep them from being attentive during their tutoring lessons? Do they thrive on activity, fun, and games?   If your students are anything like mine, the answer to these questions is a resounding "yes." Today I'd like to share 3 easy, "outside the box" tips for keeping your tutoring sessions fun and exciting.   1. Get Outside If weather permits it, go outside during a session for some outdoor activities and games. Play HORSE to review spelling words. Throw a frisbee; each time your student catches the frisbee they must answer a question to then pass it back to you. Jump rope while counting your ABC's. Often times, we as tutors can use kids' pent up energy to our advantage through games like this.   2. Play Music For memorization activities like the periodical table or the dates of WWII battles, play instrumental music and create a song to remember the facts... read more

Do some of your students lack focus? Does pent up energy keep them from being attentive during their tutoring lessons? Do they thrive on activity, fun, and games?   If your students are anything like mine, the answer to these questions is a resounding "yes." Today I'd like to share 3 easy, "outside the box" tips for keeping your tutoring sessions fun and exciting.   1. Get Outside If weather permits it, go outside during a session for some outdoor activities and games. Play HORSE to review spelling words. Throw a frisbee; each time your student catches the frisbee they must answer a question to then pass it back to you. Jump rope while counting your ABC's. Often times, we as tutors can use kids' pent up energy to our advantage through games like this.   2. Play Music For memorization activities like the periodical table or the dates of WWII battles, play instrumental music and create a song to remember the facts... read more

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