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Esther H.

Alexandria, VA

$40/hr

Read (Red) Writing Hood Tutor and Math-odology Maestra

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Read (Red) Writing Hood Tutor and Math-odology Maestra

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I'm an innovative Reading, Writing, and Math tutor with a red "basket" (bag) of Reading goodies, a Careful Reading and Creative Writing Hood, a Math-odology for capturing wolves with Math-ive [massive] jaws, and a predictable rescuer of "Grammar." While my bag and my hood may be "red," it is my lessons which are "read."

I am Mrs. "Poindexter" Esther. Students call me simply "Mrs. Esther" or "Mrs. H." Yes, I am a poindexter of sorts; however, I am a caring, capable, and dependable one, whose chief goal in tutoring these subjects is your child's learning success.

I have taught students successfully in these subjects from 1st grade through 8th grade. I have taught grade-level material to my students as well as advanced-level activities for students with gifts in either subject, and I have also made use of unconventional tools or helps for those with learning disabilities. Additionally, I find that an individual student's primary learning style - auditory, visual, or kinesthetic style - is important to establish right away when beginning to teach them in a subject. (The kinesthetic learning style refers to hands-on learning.)

My goals for the first and second sessions will be to discover basic information from parents and students, as follows:
1. Current school, and curriculum in use there,
2. Current academic standing,
3. Recent academic improvements and challenges,
4. Student primary/secondary learning styles,
5. Student goals and parent goals for tutoring in subject,
6. Problems requiring attention, prioritized,
7. Gifts or learning disability, if any, and
8. Student personality and interests.

The reason I ask about personality and interests is to discover on what levels the student will likely connect with the subject, in order to maximize both learning and retention through student-specific motivation techniques, thereby also training the student towards effectively motivating himself or herself.

It is also possible - only if necessary - that I might ask for a general idea of the student's background and living environment, if it seems crucial towards providing the student with the best academic assistance possible in the subject to be tutored. If so, I would be certain to explain clearly my reasoning for requesting this information. I will adjust accordingly and be diligent to do my best tutoring with what information that I do have. I will seek to communicate any recommended changes in goals or methods to the parents, and also to the student if he/she is old enough to understand, so that we are all continuing on that "same page."

As to my methods in tutoring Reading, I tailor my approach to the student's individual reading needs. Previously, I have successfully tutored students exhibiting primarily visual and kinesthetic learning styles. I have successfully addressed also the challenge of Dyslexia, beginning with context of words and whole word recognition to contribute to more fluent reading and increase confidence in reading comprehension. As fluency and comprehension start to increase, I can better teach the breaking down of words into their phonetic and alphabetic parts.

As to my methods in tutoring Math, I begin with solving a problem on paper, follow up by reviewing the student's approach used and noting good as well as improvable aspects of the solution process he uses. For the auditory learner, I more likely would talk through the student's solving method and highlight words in the instructions that the student might need to pay more attention to. As to the visual learner, I would probably show him what the format of the solution needs to look like, maybe along with a generic format that he could memorize in order to "picture" when working a problem. The kinesthetic learner "connects" well with the hands-on tool found in often in public and school libraries: the abacus. The abacus, originating with the ancient Chinese, is a "calculator" with lined-up beads attached to a frame or base. The abacus immensely helped one 3rd grade kinesthetic learner of mine when I taught the gifted program, such that he went from complete frustration with all 4 basic operations (+, -, *, and /) to confidently demonstrating the "/" (division) operation by abacus in front of his peers.

As to my methods in tutoring Writing, some students with handwriting difficulty, spelling, or "writer's block" are in fact magnificent story-tellers who feel more "at home" communicating verbally rather than on paper. Therefore, I may use verbal story-telling with them as a "springboard" to get them past the hurdle of that pesky pen-on-paper problem.

I also, as the previous sentence demonstrates, have a propensity for periodically and purposefully punctuating lessons playfully with poetic device. A "spoonful of sugar" approach such as that often helps! But, with any student, positive reinforcement through praise for their achievements and improvements is essential.

At times, the student may be experiencing more than one difficulty with the subject. Addressing one issue at a time is, I believe, the best approach, so that the student does not become confused or overwhelmed. A lot of patience and many, many "baby steps" can do wonders to get the job done.

Finally, I will simply say "thank you" for your time and consideration of me as your potential tutor. I look forward to meeting and working with you soon!

"Excellent reading coach!"

- Kristin, Alexandria, VA on 10/22/12
Esther replied on 10/22/2012

Thank you, Kristin! Yes, your son is progressing very, very well in his reading - in pronunciation, expression, pacing, and comprehension. It should be fun to see how much further along he is by the time this academic year comes to a close! I look forward to tutoring him in Math as well; if he has the same sharp observation skills in tackling math problems that he does in tackling difficult word pronunciation, I expect great things!

"Excellent Tutor for My First Grader!"

- Cindy, Alexandria, VA on 10/25/12
Esther replied on 10/28/2012

Thank you, Cindy! Your daughter is very lovely, bright, eager to learn, and a joy to be getting to know! I look forward to getting more into growing her ability & love for reading and her interest in and fun with math. I look forward also to you and your husband's active participation in your daughter's learning process, alongside me, to increase her skills and joy in these activities, both of which are not only fundamental academic subjects but also fulfilling careers, fun pasttimes, and foundational skills for daily living. I'm so grateful for this opportunity - thank you again.

"Very patient "

- Lorice, Springfield, VA on 10/17/12
Esther replied on 10/28/2012

Thank you, Lorice! Since you already know your writing "voice," all you need now is to mature and develop that voice, with its unique style and personality, through a practical, down-to-earth (most likely journalistic) approach to grammar and organization of ideas. And do not neglect to regularly practice the principles you learn; apply them whenever you can. I believe that people--including me--need to "hear" the beauty of your written message to everyone around you. Believe in this yourself-- and don't give up!

"Makes reading fun!"

- Lisa, Alexandria, VA on 10/10/12
Esther replied on 10/10/2012

Thank you, Lisa! I am so happy that he and you are finding joy in his learning as he increases his ability to decode unfamiliar words. I am learning a lot more about dyslexia in the process, too! Wanting so much to see him succeed and feel good about his reading is a real motivator for me. Thank you so much for this opportunity, your son is a real joy!

Elementary Education:
Elementary Math,
Grammar,
Reading,
Spelling,
Vocabulary
Corporate Training:
Grammar

Approved subjects are in bold.

Approved subjects

In most cases, tutors gain approval in a subject by passing a proficiency exam. For some subject areas, like music and art, tutors submit written requests to demonstrate their proficiency to potential students. If a tutor is interested but not yet approved in a subject, the subject will appear in non-bold font. Tutors need to be approved in a subject prior to beginning lessons.

Algebra 1

Algebra I is primarily (1) solving basic equations with multiple operations going on (and learning that "multiply" and "divide" have priority over "add" and "subtract"), and (2) solving equations containing one variable ("Solve for x").

I love the subject of Math and love to explain it to other students of varying capabilities, strengths & weaknesses, & learning style preferences. I maintained a 4.0 GPA in all my elementary, junior high, and high school math courses. In college, I took 3 quarters of math courses: Calculus (2 quarters), and Probability and Statistics. I received a 3.0 GPA for these college courses.

I have been advised by colleagues and friends over the years that I have a way of explaining and demonstrating lessons or processes on an easy-to-understand level. I have received this compliment from colleagues in office settings, from colleagues in academic settings, and from friends in both academic and informal settings.

As with most subjects, there is often more than one pathway in Math to calculate the equation or story problem at hand. Often, however, only one or two methods are taught in school, and those methods of choice may not "reach" certain students according to their brains' ways of processing data, thereby leaving those students to make feeble yet futile attempts to catch on. I can help these otherwise "left behind" students by using alternative or innovative methods to reach them according to their particular learning styles and ways of processing the world around them.

I can also successfully provide enrichment activities or advanced lessons for students who are advanced placement students or who are gifted in the subject of Math. I myself was an advanced placement student in high school and appreciated the challenges offered me in the classroom for those courses. I also taught gifted students in grades 1-8 for one full academic year, so I have a bit of experience in this area as well. For advanced students who do not have the benefit of A.P. classes, I can challenge them to maximize their ability and reach towards their potential.

As to methods, it can be helpful to not only be attentive to individual learning style of the student but also to their level of motivation in the subject. It may be beneficial to have the student work math problems similar to those of their homework assignments, but ones which apply the math to a subject the student is highly interested in. For example, if the student loves to play soccer, it may help to have him or her work a story problem involving "solve for x" in the context of determining whether their current best record (from a previous season) of the ratio of goals to wins is beatable in the current season.

Elementary Math

Elementary Math covers the most basic of all math knowledge, the number system, then on to the 4 operations (+, -, *, /), the basics of geometrical shapes, and fractions.

How these principles are best taught by tutor to student, I believe, depends most particularly upon the student's learning style. Some students will be fairly adept as abstract learners. These are the students towards whom the most traditional math equation-solving methods are aimed. Other students, however, are mostly or entirely kinesthetic learners, requiring a "hands-on" approach in order to understand how to handle Math.

Since the traditional methods are fairly well-known, given that they are most often used in schools, I will give an idea of what my "hands-on" method(s) might be in tutoring these Elementary Math principles.

For tutoring the number system, the "hands-on" approach I would use would be a single object to show "One," two objects to show "Two," and so on. If recall of the word for the corresponding number is problematic, then I would employ mnemonics, that is, memory aids. I would either choose objects whose name begins with the sound that begins the number at hand, or I would try putting the numbers to a tune that the child relates to & likes.

For the 4 operations, I would make use of the hands-on tool, often found in libraries in the Resource / Children's section, called the abacus. This tool of ancient origin proved before in my teaching, specifically in my case with 3rd graders, to be incredibly helpful to ONE student -- but do not back off yet because it was just one. This student had a disability such that, every time he approached the marking board to work a problem, he literally "froze" and could not proceed. He was indeed smart enough to do such a problem. And he was not the least bit shy normally in front of other students. But something about getting out his calculations (or even ideas, as in writing) using a writing instrument, just did not work for him! But when he learned the abacus, and I asked the class for a volunteer to demonstrate one of the 4 operations of their choice one day, his hand shot up and he happily exclaimed,
"Division!" Need more be said.

As to lessons about the basics of geometrical shapes, a hands-on approach is normally, traditionally used anyway, and so there is nothing I have to add about this subject, other than the fact that I would provide one-on-one demonstration to the student, as well as time observing the student trying to imitate what I've done with the shapes, and remediate if necessary.

Finally, as to the tutoring of fraction basics and operations, I would use any one or more of a variety of objects to illustrate the principles being taught. Apples, foam shapes, paper or cardboard shapes, tangrams, cork coasters -- all these can be cut easily (although tangrams already are cut) into a specified number of pieces to represent the fraction in the problem that the student needs to solve. And the student can pick the pieces and move them around to see what happens when he has 2 out of 5, 3 out of 11, etc.

Also, there is learning how to count coins, also telling time, and other math-related concepts, which involve objects anyway, some of which can be used, considering the best size that is most adeptly handled by the student being tutored.

English

The subject of English is composed of several narrower subjects within its broad scope: Reading, Writing, Spelling, Grammar, Vocabulary, and Literature.

The best approach in tutoring any student in an English subject depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject.

For my approach to tutoring Reading, Writing, Spelling, Grammar, and Vocabulary, please see the description for each respective, separately-listed subject in my tutor profile.

As to Literature, this is a subject within English that this tutor studied in college but has not taught, other than Poetry of mostly American authorship. An approach similar to that for the subject Reading is what I tend to want to use. I also, however, make certain to give my students opportunities to try their own hand at writing poetry, to get the "feel" (or "insight" or "inspiration") for creating poetry themselves.

Grammar

The best approach in tutoring any student in Grammar depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject. An auditory learner, again, best learns how to grasp a grammatical exercise with clear and concise instructions for the assignment and a description of each grammatical part of speech that she can understand and apply. A visual learner best learns to succeed in this subject by visual memorization and also visual placing each part of speech or punctuation in any given sentence construct. A kinesthetic learner will better learn placement of parts of speech or punctuation through use of "cut-outs" for each item, which can then be moved or shuffled either to learn placement in a sentence or as "flash cards." Preferably each "cut-out" is made from a different textured paper (or other textured material). Sentence types (statements, imperatives, questions, etc.) can be taught to the kinesthetic learner through association with actions, behaviors, or body language.

Literature

Literature is a subject within English, which I studied in college. I have experience teaching American Poetry.

The best approach in tutoring any student in Poetry or other Literature depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject.

An auditory learner will likely be assisted by taking turns reading small passages aloud and then answering questions that evaluate and enhance comprehension, and discuss portions of the work that are "open" to some interpretation. Listening to an audio recording of the literary piece may also be incorporated, if available for use.

A visual learner will also likely benefit from an audio recording of the work, as performed by seasoned radio/recording actors who use appropriate vocal inflections as well as good diction, which aids in imagining the characters' faces as they speak, or the setting which the characters describe and in which they find themselves. Reading aloud short passages at a time, interspersed with having the student paraphrase his description of what is happening and what the scene "looks like" is helpful. A video version of the work may possibly also be of benefit (if available), although only after the student's imagination is first elicited via reading and through listening to the audio.

A kinesthetic learner will likely learn best by a combination of reading aloud, listening to an audio recording, and also acting out selected scenes as they recount the dialogue by paraphrasing, preferably with the use of some well-chosen and available props.

I also, however, make certain to give my students opportunities to try their own hand at writing in the form of the genre being studied. For example, if poetry, then write a poem; if a short story, then create their own short story; if period literature, then write a description of their day according to the linguistic expressions of the period for that literary work; if modern literature that uses modern linguistic expression, then perhaps imagine what might have been a "deleted scene" from the work and write that.

Prealgebra

Prealgebra --the preparation of the student for taking the subject of Algebra I-- takes the student to a whole new level and world in the realm of Mathematics, one which may excite and challenge the student's ability and imagination, or possibly one which may frustrate and bore a student into endless cries or complaints of "I don't see how this could EVER apply to me," or quite simply, "I hate Math!!!!"

I love the subject of Math and love to explain it to other students of varying capabilities, strengths & weaknesses, & learning style preferences --and this includes those whose preference or style would be that Math be obliterated permanently from school curriculum.

I maintained a 4.0 GPA in all my elementary, junior high, and high school math courses. In college, I took 3 quarters of math courses: Calculus (2 quarters), and Probability and Statistics. I received a 3.0 GPA for these college courses.

I have been advised by colleagues and friends over the years that I have a way of explaining and demonstrating lessons or processes on an easy-to-understand level. I have received this compliment from colleagues in office settings, from colleagues in academic settings, and from friends in both academic and informal settings.

As with most subjects, there is often more than one pathway in Math to calculate the equation or story problem at hand. Often, however, only one or two methods are taught in school, and those methods of choice may not "reach" certain students according to their brains' ways of processing data, thereby leaving those students to make feeble yet futile attempts to catch on. I can help these otherwise "left behind" students by using alternative or innovative methods to reach them according to their particular learning styles and ways of processing the world around them.

I can also successfully provide enrichment activities or advanced lessons for students who are advanced placement students or who are gifted in the subject of Math. I myself was an advanced placement student in high school and appreciated the challenges offered me in the classroom for those courses. I also taught gifted students in grades 1-8 for one full academic year, so I have a bit of experience in this area as well. For advanced students who do not have the benefit of A.P. classes, I can challenge them to maximize their ability and reach towards their potential.

As to methods, it can be helpful to not only be attentive to individual learning style of the student but also to their level of motivation in the subject. It may be beneficial to have the student work math problems similar to those of their homework assignments, but ones which apply the math to a subject the student is highly interested in. For example, if the student loves to play soccer, it may help to have him or her work a story problem involving "solve for x" in the context of determining whether their current best record (from a previous season) of the ratio of goals to wins is beatable in the current season.

Reading

The best approach in tutoring any student in Reading depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject.

An auditory learner will likely improve with more sounding out of words and practicing the right voice inflections to aid comprehension of a passage. A visual learner will probably read better by practicing the visualization of problem words, and by penciling accent marks where voice inflection should be. A kinesthetic learner will likely learn best by hearing/feeling the sensations in the mouth, along with learning by association of each word or phrase with a physical object that can be picked up and held when reading a passage.

Motivation to better learn to read can also be addressed. For example, reading a book that covers a subject of specific interest to the student can be a motivator. Also, for the more imaginative and talkative student, imagining what "else" could happen, or could have happened, in the story can be a motivator to read the story through in order to add his or her own ideas and word imagery to the story to make it "better" in the even that he/she is feeling bored with it.

Learning disabilities in Reading can be addressed as well. For example, a student exhibiting elements of Dyslexia can be taught to read problematic words possibly by emphasizing whole word recognition, or also by methods which help them distinguish between certain letters of the alphabet, such as "b" versus "d," "p" versus "g," or "f" versus "t." The context (story line) is also helpful to remind the student of, in order to help him or her recognize specific words in a sentence, or perhaps even the order in which the words appear.

Spelling

The best approach in tutoring any student in Spelling depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject. An auditory learner will be especially frustrated when any word is not spelled the way it sounds; hence, one approach is to teach the student to associate that word with what the actual spelling of the word "sounds like" when "sounded out" from the spelling. Association of a word spelling with its sounding-out can help her recall the spelling. A visual learner is most likely to have the greatest success with spelling; however, when difficulties arise, "picturing" either the spelled word or an image associated with any portion of it can help. As for a kinesthetic learner, a word's spelling may be associated with a physical object or action, or the spelling could be put to rhyme, rhythm, or a musical tune for assistance with good recall.

Vocabulary

The best approach in tutoring any student in Vocabulary depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject. The auditory learner is generally satisfied with the dictionary definition of the word being taught, provided that each definition is clearly understood by the learner, and provided there are few or no apparent contradictions among definitions for the same word. If there are contradictions, however, then further explanation by examples or by examining the etymology (history/origin) for the word would be best. A visual learner will probably best succeed by associating the word with its corresponding image, or, if the word is strictly abstract, by associating the word with a related word's corresponding image, until the student can form a ready visual image that makes sense - to him - to aid in recall of the word's meaning. The kinesthetic learner will best succeed also by formulating an associative relationship to the word, except that, unlike the visual student for whom an image is sufficient, he must connect it with the actual physical object (if there is one), or with a familiar place or person.

Writing

The best approach in tutoring any student in Writing depends upon the student's learning style and also upon the student's strengths and/or weaknesses in this subject.

An auditory learner will likely improve with the most clear and sufficient verbal instructions to best convey what is required, plus talking through the assignment and jotting down key words or phrases to kick-start his thoughts. A visual learner will probably write better by visualizing as much as possible just what he wants to write for the assignment. Writing down key words or phrases in the format of an idea web, a sentence expander, a sensory list, a story "map," and an outline, followed by their rough draft, is also helpful for visual learners, in order to see a progression and organization in front of them. A kinesthetic learner, on the other hand, may have more marked difficulty with starting in on writing down his ideas. Such a student needs to feel a physical element within the writing process in order to let ideas formulate and then "flow" onto paper. To increase that physicality or tangibility, the kinesthetic student will need to do whatever physical motions with his body, or to hold whatever physical objects related to the writing topic that will help him to tangibly "connect" with the topic - along with a sense of inner passion and motivation of having something he finds compelling to share - and therefore find the inspiration necessary to go through the arduous effort of translating his tangible ideas into less tangible words on paper.

California State Univ Fullerton
Linguistics
California State Univ San Bernardino
Graduate Coursework

Education

California State Univ Fullerton (Linguistics)

California State Univ San Bernardino (Graduate Coursework)

Excellent reading coach! — Esther tutors my 5th grade son in reading, and he is making great progress. Esther's approach to tutoring includes a thorough understanding of my son, and extensive communications with me, to ensure that my son is getting the most productive learning experience. Esther has a great rapport with my son, and we will be having her expand her sessions to include math tutoring soon! ...

— Kristin, Alexandria, VA on 10/22/12

Hourly fee

Standard Hourly Fee: $40.00

Cancellation: 2 hours notice required

Travel policy

Esther will travel within 10 miles of Alexandria, VA 22304.


About Esther

I'm an innovative Reading, Writing, and Math tutor with a red "basket" (bag) of Reading goodies, a Careful Reading and Creative Writing Hood, a Math-odology for capturing wolves with Math-ive [massive] jaws, and a predictable rescuer of "Grammar." While my bag and my hood may be "red," it is my lessons which are "read."

I am Mrs. "Poindexter" Esther. Students call me simply "Mrs. Esther" or "Mrs. H." Yes, I am a poindexter of sorts; however, I am a caring, capable, and dependable one, whose chief goal in tutoring these subjects is your child's learning success.

I have taught students successfully in these subjects from 1st grade through 8th grade. I have taught grade-level material to my students as well as advanced-level activities for students with gifts in either subject, and I have also made use of unconventional tools or helps for those with learning disabilities. Additionally, I find that an individual student's primary learning style - auditory, visual, or kinesthetic style - is important to establish right away when beginning to teach them in a subject. (The kinesthetic learning style refers to hands-on learning.)

My goals for the first and second sessions will be to discover basic information from parents and students, as follows:
1. Current school, and curriculum in use there,
2. Current academic standing,
3. Recent academic improvements and challenges,
4. Student primary/secondary learning styles,
5. Student goals and parent goals for tutoring in subject,
6. Problems requiring attention, prioritized,
7. Gifts or learning disability, if any, and
8. Student personality and interests.

The reason I ask about personality and interests is to discover on what levels the student will likely connect with the subject, in order to maximize both learning and retention through student-specific motivation techniques, thereby also training the student towards effectively motivating himself or herself.

It is also possible - only if necessary - that I might ask for a general idea of the student's background and living environment, if it seems crucial towards providing the student with the best academic assistance possible in the subject to be tutored. If so, I would be certain to explain clearly my reasoning for requesting this information. I will adjust accordingly and be diligent to do my best tutoring with what information that I do have. I will seek to communicate any recommended changes in goals or methods to the parents, and also to the student if he/she is old enough to understand, so that we are all continuing on that "same page."

As to my methods in tutoring Reading, I tailor my approach to the student's individual reading needs. Previously, I have successfully tutored students exhibiting primarily visual and kinesthetic learning styles. I have successfully addressed also the challenge of Dyslexia, beginning with context of words and whole word recognition to contribute to more fluent reading and increase confidence in reading comprehension. As fluency and comprehension start to increase, I can better teach the breaking down of words into their phonetic and alphabetic parts.

As to my methods in tutoring Math, I begin with solving a problem on paper, follow up by reviewing the student's approach used and noting good as well as improvable aspects of the solution process he uses. For the auditory learner, I more likely would talk through the student's solving method and highlight words in the instructions that the student might need to pay more attention to. As to the visual learner, I would probably show him what the format of the solution needs to look like, maybe along with a generic format that he could memorize in order to "picture" when working a problem. The kinesthetic learner "connects" well with the hands-on tool found in often in public and school libraries: the abacus. The abacus, originating with the ancient Chinese, is a "calculator" with lined-up beads attached to a frame or base. The abacus immensely helped one 3rd grade kinesthetic learner of mine when I taught the gifted program, such that he went from complete frustration with all 4 basic operations (+, -, *, and /) to confidently demonstrating the "/" (division) operation by abacus in front of his peers.

As to my methods in tutoring Writing, some students with handwriting difficulty, spelling, or "writer's block" are in fact magnificent story-tellers who feel more "at home" communicating verbally rather than on paper. Therefore, I may use verbal story-telling with them as a "springboard" to get them past the hurdle of that pesky pen-on-paper problem.

I also, as the previous sentence demonstrates, have a propensity for periodically and purposefully punctuating lessons playfully with poetic device. A "spoonful of sugar" approach such as that often helps! But, with any student, positive reinforcement through praise for their achievements and improvements is essential.

At times, the student may be experiencing more than one difficulty with the subject. Addressing one issue at a time is, I believe, the best approach, so that the student does not become confused or overwhelmed. A lot of patience and many, many "baby steps" can do wonders to get the job done.

Finally, I will simply say "thank you" for your time and consideration of me as your potential tutor. I look forward to meeting and working with you soon!

Testimonials

"Excellent reading coach!"

- Kristin, Alexandria, VA on 10/22/12
Esther replied on 10/22/2012

Thank you, Kristin! Yes, your son is progressing very, very well in his reading - in pronunciation, expression, pacing, and comprehension. It should be fun to see how much further along he is by the time this academic year comes to a close! I look forward to tutoring him in Math as well; if he has the same sharp observation skills in tackling math problems that he does in tackling difficult word pronunciation, I expect great things!

"Excellent Tutor for My First Grader!"

- Cindy, Alexandria, VA on 10/25/12
Esther replied on 10/28/2012

Thank you, Cindy! Your daughter is very lovely, bright, eager to learn, and a joy to be getting to know! I look forward to getting more into growing her ability & love for reading and her interest in and fun with math. I look forward also to you and your husband's active participation in your daughter's learning process, alongside me, to increase her skills and joy in these activities, both of which are not only fundamental academic subjects but also fulfilling careers, fun pasttimes, and foundational skills for daily living. I'm so grateful for this opportunity - thank you again.

"Very patient "

- Lorice, Springfield, VA on 10/17/12
Esther replied on 10/28/2012

Thank you, Lorice! Since you already know your writing "voice," all you need now is to mature and develop that voice, with its unique style and personality, through a practical, down-to-earth (most likely journalistic) approach to grammar and organization of ideas. And do not neglect to regularly practice the principles you learn; apply them whenever you can. I believe that people--including me--need to "hear" the beauty of your written message to everyone around you. Believe in this yourself-- and don't give up!

"Makes reading fun!"

- Lisa, Alexandria, VA on 10/10/12
Esther replied on 10/10/2012

Thank you, Lisa! I am so happy that he and you are finding joy in his learning as he increases his ability to decode unfamiliar words. I am learning a lot more about dyslexia in the process, too! Wanting so much to see him succeed and feel good about his reading is a real motivator for me. Thank you so much for this opportunity, your son is a real joy!


Education

California State Univ Fullerton
Linguistics
California State Univ San Bernardino
Graduate Coursework

Education

California State Univ Fullerton (Linguistics)

California State Univ San Bernardino (Graduate Coursework)


Tutor Policies

Cancellation
2 hours notice required
Travel Radius
Travels within 10 miles of Alexandria, VA 22304

Esther’s Subjects

Elementary Education:
Elementary Math,
Grammar,
Reading,
Spelling,
Vocabulary
Corporate Training:
Grammar

Approved subjects are in bold.

Approved subjects

In most cases, tutors gain approval in a subject by passing a proficiency exam. For some subject areas, like music and art, tutors submit written requests to demonstrate their proficiency to potential students. If a tutor is interested but not yet approved in a subject, the subject will appear in non-bold font. Tutors need to be approved in a subject prior to beginning lessons.


Background Check Status for Esther H.

Esther H. passed a background check on 1/8/15. The check was ordered by Esther through First Advantage. For more information, please review the background check information page.

After sending a message to Esther, you will be able to order a new background check for $7.99. As part of your tutor selection process, we encourage you to run updated background checks. Please also review the safety tips for hiring tutors.