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Kathy T.

Diverse, Committed, Exhuberant

Elizabethtown, PA (17022)

Travel radius
40 miles
Hourly fee
$40.00
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Life-time-member of the Girl Scouts (40+ years), and Tutor and Biology Lab Assistant at HACC, I have been working with scouts and students of all ages for most of my life. Teaching trail building to seven-year-olds, leading process improvement or team-building meetings at work, or showing pre-clinical nursing students the functions of the latissimus dorsi muscle, I am versatile, adaptable, flexible, and committed to excellence. Able to transition from teaching my friend’s 5 year old granddaughter about ice hockey to teaching my Senior Biology Professor mentor html at school, I can use my communication background and skills to successfully interact with nearly anyone. The special training in communication styles and modes helps me target specific analogies, examples, and vocabulary to help nearly anyone understand nearly anything. Balancing working toward a Master’s in Adult Education from Penn State with weekend home health care as a Certified Nursing Assistant, I am diverse, attentive, exuberant, creative, and able to motivate and stimulate the student or scout with a passion for the adventure of learning.
Want to learn Latin? Polish your English composition skills? Master those Geometry proofs? Learn to balance chemical equations and oxidation-reduction reactions? Identify the sternocleidomastoid? I can help.

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Kathy’s subjects

Math:
ACT Math, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Calculus, Differential Equations, Discrete Math, Geometry, Linear Algebra, Logic, Prealgebra, Precalculus, Probability, SAT Math, Statistics, Trigonometry
English:
ACT English, ACT Reading, Bible Studies, English, ESL/ESOL, Grammar, Literature, Proofreading, Public Speaking, Reading, SAT Reading, SAT Writing, Vocabulary, Writing
Science:
ACT Science, Anatomy, Anthropology, Archaeology, Astronomy, Biochemistry, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Ecology, Genetics, Geology, Microbiology, Nursing, Nutrition, Organic Chemistry, Pharmacology, Philosophy, Physical Science, Physics, Physiology, Psychology, Sociology, Zoology
Computer:
Dreamweaver, General Computer, HTML, Mathematica, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Word, Web Design
Language:
ESL/ESOL, Latin, Speech
History:
American History, Anthropology, Archaeology, Classics, Criminal Justice, European History, Geography, Government & Politics, Music History, Political Science, Religion, Social Studies, World History
Music:
Clarinet, General Music, Music History
Art:
Theatre
Elementary Education:
Elementary (K-6th), Elementary Math, Elementary Science, Grammar, Handwriting, Phonics, Reading, Spelling, Study Skills, Vocabulary
Special Needs:
Business:
Accounting, Business, Career Development, Economics, Finance, GMAT, GRE, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Word, Public Speaking
Homeschool:
Accounting, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Economics, Elementary (K-6th), English, ESL/ESOL, Geometry, Handwriting, Physics, Prealgebra, Precalculus, Reading, SAT Math, SAT Reading, Statistics, Study Skills, Writing
Test Preparation:
ACT English, ACT Math, ACT Reading, ACT Science, AFOQT, ASVAB, Career Development, College Counseling, GED, GMAT, GRE, LSAT, MCAT, NCLEX, Praxis, PSAT, SAT Math, SAT Reading, SAT Writing, SSAT, TEAS
Sports/Recreation:
Cooking, Fitness, Needlework, Sewing
Corporate Training:
Accounting, Business, Career Development, College Counseling, Criminal Justice, Economics, ESL/ESOL, Finance, General Computer, GMAT, Grammar, HTML, Latin, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, NCLEX, Proofreading, Public Speaking, Statistics, Web Design

AFOQT

I hold a degree in Communication and the Arts with a concentration in public speaking. I prepare students for academic aptitude, verbal and quantitative sections of the AFOQT by combining printed and online resources. I guide students through a diagnostic assessment to identify their areas of strength and weakness, and target preparation to those areas, including test simulations and exercises, in order to identify the correct responses on the AFOQT to achieve a good score.

I have tutored and taught social science, math, science, and language arts for many years, as well as SAT, GRE, ASVAB, GED. RN-CLEX, TEAS, MCAT, and other boards preparation classes in math, reading, and composition. One young man who hopes to become a Marine raised his ASVAB from 22 to 48. Another dyslexic student raised his SAT high enough to apply for the college of his choice. The ADHD student with whom I started chemistry last summer is earning “A’s” in his class.

AFOQT questions are multiple choice with 4 or 5 possible options and only one correct response. There is no penalty for guessing. My AFOQT preparation will include strategies to rule out multiple choice answers to limit the choices and improve the probability of an accurate guess.

Targeted vocabulary development including the use of word roots, prefixes and suffixes will prepare the candidate for the verbal analogy and word knowledge sections, as well as enabling the correct interpretation of the questions on the test.

Thorough math review covers arithmetic fundamentals, logic, geometry, trigonometry, and precalculus to prepare the candidate for the math sections of the AFOQT.

The AFOQT generally contains the following sections:

1. Verbal Analogies requires a well developed vocabulary and the ability to determine the relationships between words.

2. Arithmetic Reasoning requires correct math operations to solve problems without a calculator. Many find this section limited to addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division..

3. Word Knowledge explores the correct identification and use of synonyms.

4. Math Knowledge tests the candidate’s ability to utilize math logically solve problems. Many find this similar to the properties and logic of algebraic expressions using the properties of math such as the addition property identity/multiplication property of identity.

5. Instrument Comprehension requires reading and interpreting dials and identifying the resulting direction of the plane

6. Block Counting required three dimensional perception to determine the number of blocks adjacent to or touching the selected block.

7. Table Reading includes correctly interpreting data represented in a table. -- 40 questions in 7 minutes -- to pass this one, just understand the tables as quickly as you can.

8. Aviation Information requires the understanding of concepts and terminology of aviation.

9. General Science tests the candidates for thorough knowledge of science concepts.

10. Rotated Blocks require spatial awareness to manipulate various items and set them aright.

11. Hidden Figures, also called template matching, tests the ability to see smaller objects inside a larger object. –

12. Self-Description Inventory gathers information to determine into what general personality categories the candidate aligns.

The AFOQT lasts approximately 3.5 hour, which includes preparation of the answer sheets, administrative time between sections, and a 10 minute break. My AFOQT preparation will include tips and strategies for test taking, as well as for improving test day stamina and endurance.

Thank you

Anthropology

In addition to independent studies, I have earned the grade of “A” in “Introductory Anthropology”, “Social Anthropology”, “Cultures of the World”, and “Survey of North American Indian Culture”. In addition to this, I have taught First Nations/Native American Culture and Arts for more than 40 years in the older-girl program in the former Hemlock Girl Scout Council (now “Scouts in the Heart of PA”) both as a member of the Order of the Red Flame and as a Council volunteer.
Although First Nations/Native American culture is my area of focus, I have also studied various other cultures and people groups in depth, including but not limited to the following geographic regions: Central and South America, India, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and South East Asia. My degree is in “Social Science” and includes a concentration in Anthropology and in Sociology.
I believe that anthropology properly includes the study of the people in context, including belief system, technology, environment, customs, foods, clothing and garb, recreation, occupations and professions, social groupings, and language. I am prepared and willing to address all of these in a manner that promotes greater understanding, respect, and diversity.

Archaeology

In addition to independent studies, I have earned the grade of “A” in “Introductory Anthropology”, “Social Anthropology”, “Cultures of the World”, and “Survey of North American Indian Culture”. As archaeology was taught as a specialization within Anthropology and as a means of obtaining the material evidence of hte cultures, I believe this connection to be appropriate. In addition to this, I have taught First Nations/Native American Culture and Arts for more than 40 years in the older-girl program in the former Hemlock Girl Scout Council (now “Scouts in the Heart of PA”) both as a member of the Order of the Red Flame and as a Council volunteer. This also included collection, cataloging, and analysis of artifacts and items of material culture related to the cultures, particularly from Pennsylvania.
Although First Nations/Native American culture is my area of focus, I have also studied various other cultures and people groups in depth, including but not limited to the following geographic regions: Central and South America, India, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and South East Asia. My degree is in “Social Science” and includes a concentration in Anthropology and in Sociology.
I believe that anthropology properly includes the study of the people in context, including belief system, technology, environment, customs, foods, clothing and garb, recreation, occupations and professions, social groupings, and language, and that archaeology is a means to discover evidence to reveal those technologies, foods, and other material culture. I am prepared and willing to address all of these in a manner that promotes greater understanding, respect, and diversity.

Dyslexia

Please consider my qualifications to serve students with dyslexia and other sensory challenges to learning and communication.

I learned from many years of working with a close family member that a multi-sensory approach is helpful for dyslexic students, combining visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory (smelling) and, occasionally, gustatory (tasting.) When I made edible molecules from donut holes for my chemistry students, I enabled them to see the molecules with each element, to feel the structure of the molecule, to smell the different aromas of the donut flavors representing the elements (chocolate was nitrogen, plain white was oxygen, cinnamon sugared was carbon, with the miniature marshmallows being hydrogen) I enabled them to use other senses to understand the structure and composition in the amino acids and proteins we were studying.

My young geometry student struggled with surface area and volume until we made models from colored felts and marked the measurements on them. It helped to unroll the rectangle that was the cylinder so that he could see the length and width and understand the formula. For another student, I incorporated the dimensional analytical conversion from cubic centimeters to milliliters, and we filled our container, which he had measured to calculate the volume, with water. When we poured the water into his mother’s measuring cup, he was delighted to see that the level marked the same volume we had predicted with our math. It was a successful use of different senses.

My family member showed me he succeeded in school and in his 43-year career (after completing his Air Force duty) by using these techniques to combat his dyslexia symptoms and challenges:
Understand the big picture and then how the details fit into it.
Work from parts to whole
Progress from the easy to the more difficult
Move from the simple to the complex
Transition from the concrete to the abstract
Shift from the visual to the auditory
Always link new information to known information, projects, and interests.
Draw pictures and diagrams to represent the thing being studied.

Many times, we would read the text or study guide or book into a tape recorder, and he would play it back while following the text. This was tremendously helpful, even with the technology at the time. Now we have computer programs and reading aids that I incorporate into lessons.

I have worked with students of all ages, from preschoolers learning about colors to my mentor, a Harvard graduate with more than 46 years of service in education, whom I am teaching HTML and general computer skills. Each one requires a specialized plan that highlights the learning strengths and the preferred sensory modes. I have worked with cancer survivors, traumatic brain injury survivors, stroke survivors, and a variety of other challenged students, including several with diagnoses of ADHD, Aspergers, Autism, cerebral palsy, hearing impairment, dyslexia, and spina bifida, each of whom was able to improve and progress in the tasks and projects, whether it was class material from school or developing and strengthening executive function abilities and skills or just performing activities of daily living (“ADLs”). My experience as a Certified Nursing Assistant enables me to interpret nonverbal cues and other communication and helps me relate to the student in a supportive role and to respond appropriately.

Do you know your own dominant sensory mode? Do you prefer to see diagrams or hear explanations or assemble models? I have learned to identify and recognize the strengths and challenges in my students and patients, and to adapt not only my teaching style but also an assortment of study styles that will suit them.

Varying sensory modes to learn with dyslexia helped turn the lunch pizza into an enjoyable and edible demonstration of fractions, surface area and circumference of a circle, and even an examination of layers like those found in soil and rocks. The leftover cake still in the 9 inch by 13 inch pan, with various pieces removed, became our exploration of the surface area of irregular geometric shapes.

After more than 40 years working with students and youth in Girl Scouts, church, school, and the community, I have developed a solid repertoire of techniques and teaching presentations that can translate a mathematics unit on areas and volumes into a tactile experience, a geology lesson into a song, or a DNA explanation into a bead craft. I consult regularly with other educators at all age levels to exchange and share ideas, experiences, challenges, and successes.

I am persistent, patient, and tenacious. I believe that any person can learn and improve to a high level of independence, ability, and dignity.

Thank you

Elementary (K-6th)

Elementary (K-6th) studies and topics introduce, develop, and reinforce the foundational concepts necessary for academic success, as well as preparing the way for a fulfilling career, vocation, or profession. English Language Arts (“ELA”) may include reading, vocabulary development, literature, writing and composition, handwriting and penmanship, dictation, poetry, grammar, phonics, syntax, theatre, oral and written performance arts, linguistics, and public speaking.

While many reading programs and systems have developed to assist remediating students below expected grade level or to enhance and enrich students with a willingness and readiness to advance, the key elements persist, including encoding and decoding information, learning to understand and to be understood, and to communicate appropriately within the recognized parameters and expectations of cultural sensitivity and respect for diversity. In the English language Arts, my academic exposure and preference included the Korsgen Linguistic System, the Science Research Associates Inc (“SRA”) program for remedial and advance reading, The Roberts English Series Linguistic Program, the Scott Foresman Reading Series, and the Warriner English Series. More recently, I have also used Open Court Reading, and various strictly scripted reading programs like the Wilson system or the Orton Gillingham program. Studying Latin for eight years contributed significantly to my understanding of English grammar and syntax, and I convey this knowledge to my students.

My reading approach is individually adapted to each student, compatible with and aligned to local school district practices and current educational and academic standards, such as the Pennsylvania Core Standards, the Common Core State Standards, the Pennsylvania Keystone Exams, the Pennsylvania Early Childhood Education Standards, the Pennsylvania Early Learning Standards for Kindergarten, and the Pennsylvania Assessment Anchors.

In the years immediately following the implementation of the National Defense Education Act, which informed curricula, texts, and lessons in the fields commonly considered “STEM” (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) my school participated in national educational standards with the Modern School Mathematics series created by Dolciani and her associates for mastery, exceptionalism, and advancement. (More than forty years later, my students from the private schools of Linden Hall and Lancaster Country Day school are still using math texts descended from this series.) In recent years I have used Everyday Mathematics and College Preparatory Mathematics Series for students assigned to that series. From Egyptian tiles to Mayan pictographic representations of number quantities to symbolic Singapore math systems, I can render the material understandable to the student while relating the concepts to his or her interests and goals.

Geometry students learn to construct congruent and similar polygons with toothpicks that are already congruent to each other or with foam shapes that can be tangibly manipulated. Chemistry and biology students explore carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids by building edible molecules from donut holes and miniature marshmallows. Binary opposition (comparison and contrast of two completely different things, like hot/cold, light/dark, loud/quiet) that drives everything from molecular structure to assembler “computer” language is introduced with magnets with positive and negative poles; it is a small step to the presentation of protons and electrons and the foundations of atomic theory. Geology students memorize the hardness of minerals by meeting Tall George Collins from Altoona. (Talc-gypsum-calcite-apatite). Humor, as it turns out, helps people remember

I promote vocabulary development by teaching prefixes, suffixes, and word roots, incorporating Latin and Greek origins. This helps with reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. In the tradition of my sixth grade teacher, I still keep a list of words and definitions I learn each day and encourage my students to do likewise.

From flash cards with questions on one side and answers on another to silly rhymes containing class material, I can help the student recognize and adapt the study and learning style that will work for him or her. From identifying important material from lecture and notes to translating this information into a learnable format, I can help the student in every step of the process. I aspire to make it fun and enjoyable as well.


MCAT

I hold a degree in Communication and the Arts with a concentration in public speaking. I prepare students for the MCAT by combining printed and online resources. I guide students through a diagnostic assessment to identify their areas of strength and weakness, and target preparation to those areas, including test simulations and exercises, in order to identify the correct responses on the MCAT to achieve a good score.

Sewing

Trained both at home and at school in sewing and garment design, I can help you learn to sew projects from simple pillowcases and duffle bags to formal dresses, and from reenactment garb to church paraments and vestments. I can teach you the secret to creating original customized bath towels and accessories that capture your own personal interests.

Some of the typical activities in a garment project include the following: identifying the size, choosing the style, selecting or creating a pattern, finding appropriate fabric, obtaining “notions” (such as trim, zippers, buttons), altering the pattern, making a muslin version for fitting, cutting the fabric, and sewing and completing the final garment.

Because of a number of physical conditions in my immediate family, I am skilled at altering garments for accessibility or adapting them for mobility issues. I have learned to create flattering clothing for many different sizes and shapes. From the formal grey skirted business suit in size 26 to the spandex exercise outfit for the brace-wearing youngster, I have completed a variety of original projects and can share the knowledge and methods to help you master the sewing challenges you will encounter.

In addition to sewing clothing, I designed and created the costumes for the amateur science-fiction film, “Insulation,” which was filmed at Penn State in 1977. Other historically-accurate costumes include more than fifty “First Nations”/”Native American” dresses from the recognized cultural areas (such as Pacific Northwest, Northeast Woodlands, Great Lakes, etc) in North America for Native and Aboriginal studies, as well as “garb” for historical re-enactment events from “Viking,” “Medieval,” “Renaissance,” “Civil War,” “Pioneer,” “Fur Trade” and the early 1900’s.

In the late 1990’s, I accepted a request and commission to design and create two vest/overlays for drum majorettes for a school competition. My liturgical dance team costumes have been used at local churches and weddings as well as educational events. My flags and banners, originally adapted to accommodate a dancer with a broken wrist, have sold as far away as Toronto, Canada. I have taught not only the secrets of the spinning flag pole, but also the methods used to combine lame, taffeta, satin, organza, netting, and other fabrics and items into distinctive creations.

From original idea to garment or item completion, I can teach and guide you through the steps, the planning, the problem solving, the adaptations, and the enjoyment of the finished product. From cotton duck to organza and from flannel to spandex, I can help you bring your ideas into reality as you learn to sew.

Social Studies

Dear Sir or Madam
Please accept the following description of my qualifications for tutoring in “social studies” so that I can provide this service to more students.
Social studies would include history, geography, economics, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and other disciplines that investigate human behavior, the causes and consequences.

With a degree in social science, I have learned how to appreciate the history and culture of many diverse people groups, including state-level societies, commonly called “civilizations” like the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as the aboriginal first residents of the various regions of North, Central, and South America, from the Inuit to the Maya to the Susquehannock. Whether we are discussing the first explorers or the natives who encountered them, the early colonists and pioneers, settlers and adventurers, I have spent many years with my girl scouts and other youth groups finding and sharing the interesting stories and information. A member of several historical re-enactment groups, I can also appreciate the experience of dressing in clothes like those worn in the period, eating the foods, from delicacies to every day fare, cooking and working with the implements and tools of the time, and listening to the music and entertainment that would have been common. It is fun and enlightening to read first hand accounts of those who lived in the country or time and left their diaries for us to share their lives. Beyond all this, I enjoy helping the student to discover the technological, environmental, and ecological issues that helped to shape or transform a culture or a people or a society. The overall understanding of the forces at work, from the social to the political to the family to education to the beliefs and belief systems helps make the picture of the time period richer. Even sports and games and crafts and toys reflect the details of the era. Discovery can be exciting, and I enjoy sharing this enthusiasm.
I like to summarize some of the inquiry and exploration of “social studies” with these humorous questions.

Look at those people!
Who are those people?
Where are those people?
What are they doing?
Why are they doing it?
Who taught them or told them to do that?
When do you think they will do it again?
My mentor liked to write “WACTWTA” on the board, to abbreviate “Why are cultures the way they are?”

As a student, as a Girl Scout, as an active member of community groups involved in promoting awareness, diversity, understanding, and mutual respect, I have participated in activities to learn about other peoples, cultures, times, and countries. We wore the clothes, or approximations of them. We ate the food, listened to the music, played the games, discussed the pressing issues of the time. I will also encourage and promote these experiences in my students and my scouts to enable them to understand the conditions and circumstances in which others live.

The study of people and people groups and all the interactions, forces, hierarchies, and relationships helps us understand others as well as ourselves. I love to share the ability to question and to learn, from the most common act to the most complex ritual and ceremony. Studying people can be so much fun, and we always learn more about ourselves.
Thank you.

Sociology

With a degree in social science, I have learned how to appreciate the history and culture of many diverse people groups, including state-level societies, commonly called “civilizations” like the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as the aboriginal first residents of the various regions of North, Central, and South America, from the Inuit to the Maya to the Susquehannock.

Whether we are discussing the first explorers or the natives who encountered them, the early colonists and pioneers, settlers and adventurers, I have spent many years with my girl scouts and other youth groups finding and sharing the interesting stories and information. As a member of several historical re-enactment groups, I can also appreciate the experience of dressing in clothes like those worn in the period, eating the foods, from delicacies to every day fare, cooking and working with the implements and tools of the time, and listening to the music and entertainment that would have been common. It is fun and enlightening to read first hand accounts of those who lived in the country or time and left their diaries for us to share their lives. Beyond all this, I enjoy helping the student to discover the technological, environmental, and ecological issues that helped to shape or transform a culture or a people or a society. The overall understanding of the forces at work, from the social to the political to the family to education to the beliefs and belief systems helps make the picture of the time period richer. Even sports and games and crafts and toys reflect the details of the era. Discovery can be exciting, and I enjoy sharing this enthusiasm.

I like to summarize some of the inquiry and exploration of “sociology” with these humorous questions. Look at those people! Who are those people? What are they doing? Why are they doing it? Who taught them or told them to do that? When do you think they will do it again?

My mentor liked to write “WACTWTA” on the board, to abbreviate “Why are cultures the way they are.”
The study of people and people groups and all the interactions, forces, hierarchies, and relationships helps us understand others as well as ourselves. I love to share the ability to question and to learn, from the most common act to the most complex ritual and ceremony. Studying people can be so much fun.
Thank you.

Special Needs

I have worked with students of all ages, from preschoolers learning about colors to my mentor, a Harvard graduate with more than 46 years of service in education, whom I am teaching HTML and general computer skills. Each one requires a specialized plan that highlights the learning strengths and the preferred sensory modes. I have worked with cancer survivors, traumatic brain injury survivors, stroke survivors, and a variety of other challenged students, including several with diagnoses of ADHD, Aspergers, Autism, cerebral palsy, hearing impairment, and spina bifida, each of whom was able to improve and progress in the tasks and projects, whether it was class material from school or just activities of daily living (“ADLs”). My experience as a Certified Nursing Assistant enables me to interpret nonverbal cues and other communication and helps me relate to the student in a supportive role and to respond appropriately.

Do you know your own dominant sensory mode? Do you prefer to see diagrams or hear explanations or assemble models? I have learned to identify and recognize the strengths and challenges in my students and patients, and to adapt not only my teaching style but also an assortment of study styles that will suit them.

Try this a moment: which phrases are you more likely to use? “I see your point.” “That looks good to me.” (That’s visual) “That sounds fine.” “”I hear what you are saying.” (That’s hearing) “It feels okay.” “I can’t grasp what you are telling me.” (That’s touch) “It is just rotten.” “This is a fishy situation.” (That’s smell) “It leaves a bad taste in my mouth.” “They will just eat this up!” (That’s taste) Can you understand how important it may be to match the learning style to the student’s sensory mode?

After more than 40 years working with students and youth in Girl Scouts, church, school, and the community, I have developed a solid repertoire of techniques and teaching presentations that can translate a mathematics unit on areas and volumes into a tactile experience, a geology lesson into a song, or a DNA explanation into a bead craft. I consult regularly with other educators at all age levels to exchange and share ideas, experiences, challenges, and successes.

During the brief semester as a research assistant for Penn State’s Center for Healthy Child Development (CHDC), I developed more comprehensive and advanced child and family observation skills, as well as interacting with clients from a variety of high risk and challenging environments, backgrounds, and health, educational, cultural, socio-economic situations. Experience as a Youth Development Aide in a residential treatment facility for court-adjudicated youth was one of the most rewarding, and the in-service training in identifying, confronting, and correcting “Criminal Personality Traits” and “Thinking Errors” continues to enhance my interactions with all my students, clients, patients, and families.

I am persistent, patient, and tenacious. I believe that any person can learn and improve to a high level of independence, ability, and dignity.

Study Skills

As far back as kindergarten, I remember helping my classmates learn their names and addresses, as well as the colors and numerals we recited in a group each day. When we learned a Christmas poem in first grade, one line per child, I memorized the entire whole by hearing the phrases repeated. This was an early introduction to study skills and different methods for learning.

Do you know your own dominant sensory mode? Do you prefer to see diagrams or hear explanations or assemble models? I have learned to identify and recognize the strengths and challenges in my students and patients, and to adapt not only my teaching style but also an assortment of study styles that will suit them.

Try this a moment: which phrases are you more likely to use? “I see your point.” “That looks good to me.” (That’s visual) “That sounds fine.” “”I hear what you are saying.” (That’s hearing) “It feels okay.” “I can’t grasp what you are telling me.” (That’s touch) “It is just rotten.” “This is a fishy situation.” (That’s smell) “It leaves a bad taste in my mouth.” “They will just eat this up!” (That’s taste) Can you understand how important it may be to match the learning style to the student’s sensory mode?

My geometry students construct congruent and similar polygons with toothpicks that are already congruent to each other or with foam shapes that can be tangibly manipulated. My chemistry and biology students learn carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids by building edible molecules from donut holes and miniature marshmallows. My geology students learned the hardness of minerals by meeting Tall George Collins from Altoona. (Talc-gypsum-calcite-apatite). Humor, as it turns out, helps people remember.

I promote vocabulary development by teaching prefixes, suffixes, and word roots, incorporating Latin and Greek origins. This helps with reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. In the tradition of Mrs. Korsgen, my sixth grade teacher, I still keep a list of words and definitions I learn each day and encourage my students to do likewise.

From flash cards with questions on one side and answers on another to silly rhymes containing class material, I can help the student recognize and adapt the study and learning style that will work for him or her. From identifying important material from lecture and notes to translating this information into a learnable format, I can help the student in every step of the process.

I have worked with students of all ages, from preschoolers learning about colors to my mentor, a Harvard graduate with more than 46 years of service in education, whom I am teaching html. Each one requires a specialized plan that highlights the learning strengths and the preferred sensory modes. I have worked with cancer survivors, traumatic brain injury survivors, stroke survivors, and a variety of other challenged students, including several with diagnoses of ADHD, Aspergers, Autism, cerebral palsy, hearing impairment, and spina bifida, each of whom was able to improve and progress in the tasks and projects, whether it was class material from school or just activities of daily living. My experience as a Certified Nursing Assistant enables me to interpret nonverbal cues and other communication and helps me relate to the student in a supportive role and to respond appropriately. I am persistent, patient, and tenacious.

Study skills are so important to our student that my mentor spends at least two classes presenting a variety of methods. I made a printable handout of study tips for the pre-clinical nursing students that can be used by students of all ages. http://faculty.hacc.edu/cljeffre/Secrets%20of%20Successful%20Students.doc

I made the biology website where these tips are hosted while I studied for my own class, and combined a number of approaches to help myself study. I can help you develop your study skills too, so that learning is easier and more enjoyable.

You will learn
How to outline
How to figure out the meanings of words
How to learn scientific names
How to learn formulas
How to identify the important parts of a lecture
How to find a writer’s emphasis
How to manage your study time
How to prioritize your assignments
How to organize your homework
How to make studying fun

Thank you

TEAS

With degrees in Communication and the Arts with a concentration in public speaking, and in social science with a concentration on anthropology and sociology, I prepare students for the TEAS by combining printed and online resources with careful practice and review. I guide students through a diagnostic assessment to identify their areas of strength and weakness, and target preparation to those areas, including test simulations and exercises, in order to identify the correct responses on the TEAS to achieve a good score. Test taking preparation and strategy also includes techniques for improved concentration, focus, and recall.

Most students preparing for standardized tests such as SAT, ACT, ASVAB, AFOQT, GRE, MCAT, LSAT, and TEAS benefit from a thorough review of math, reading comprehension, analytical thinking and problem solving.

Using the sample questions from current and archived tests, I work through the various math and analytical reasoning problems with the student to identify areas needing review, development, re-teaching, correction, or initial teaching. Beginning with the review of basic arithmetic concepts such as the properties of addition and multiplication, the order of operations, and operations on fraction, including, but not limited to, least common multiple and greatest common factor, I will cover conversions between fractions, ratios, percentages, including pertinent clinical and real-world “word problems”. After a thorough review of exponents includes powers, roots, radicals, logarithms, negative exponents, and imaginary numbers, according to the problems expected on the test, I will address geometry definitions, concepts, theorems, postulates, and proofs, as well as trigonometric principles, especially ratios of sides of triangles in problem solving. (Sine, cosine, tangent are frequently used in calculations.)

Using a classic method of encouraging vocabulary development by teaching prefixes, suffixes, and word roots, I adapt my lessons to children learning first reading skills, students whose first language is not English, and advanced students hoping to enrich an existing understanding of the language. My knowledge of English figures of speech, including the familiar simile (“red as a rose”) or alliteration (“Pick a peck of pickled peppers”) will help the student better analyze and appreciate the various levels of meaning in the passage, poem, or reading. This method also develops critical thinking and analytical skills. My English and Reading students range from the fourth-grader mastering spelling and sentences to the 72-year-old professional educator who likes to exercise his extensive vocabulary to the 82-year-old who is profoundly gifted in math and science and problem-solving but who has struggled with reading challenges all his life. Presentation of syntax and grammar rules that dictate the proper choice of verb to correlate with the given subject, including classic English verb conjugation in all tenses and proper use of participles, present perfect, past perfect and future perfect irregular forms, will equip the student to accurately identify sentence construction errors and corrections, as well as to improve essay writing and communication skills overall.

For the TEAS, the test preparation will include a review of chemistry, biology, anatomy and physiology, according to the expected science problems. Typical test problems address molecular structure and electron configuration, thermodynamics, inter and intra-molecular forces, reactions and reaction rate calculations, equilibrium and equilibrium constants, pH, acids, bases and buffers, stoichiometry, and dimensional analysis. (The student will find dimensional analysis crucial in dosage calculations in nursing school). Study includes the foundational concepts of naming conventions, polyatomic inorganic nomenclature, organic chemistry, formulae conversion, oxidation-reduction reactions and balancing equations, and the Ideal Gas Law.

As particular needs or issues are identified, I will adapt the activity and topic to address the areas of concern in order to prepare the student to confidently and accurately master the material for the TEAS.

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Education

Penn State University (Comm, Bio, Soc Sci)

Penn State Universit (Enrolled)

Great Help! Kathy did a wonderful job with my daughter. I feel certain that one of the main reasons my daughter feels that she did well on her final exam (I just talked to her), is the well-reasoned and exuberant tutelage she received from Ms. T. She did a wonderful job, and my daughter would be happy to work with her again. ...

— Ann from Wilmington, DE on 6/3/14);

Hourly fee

Standard Hourly Fee: $40.00

Travel policy

Kathy will travel within 40 miles of Elizabethtown, PA 17022.

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Usually responds in about 11 hours

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