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Jordan V.

Physics and Math Tutor for All Types of Learners

Chicago, IL (60611)

Travel radius
15 miles
Hourly fee
$55.00
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Jordan V. passed a background check on 6/6/14. The check was ordered by Jordan through First Advantage. For more information, please review the background check information page.

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Discover how you too can think like a physicist!

As a student myself, I realize that physics and mathematics can often appear as the most daunting of school subjects. And the puzzles posed by such demand a knack for creativity and the resolve for intense contemplation. Additionally, I propose that the seed for successful comprehension resides in you as much as it does in the most accomplished of scholars.

Let me show you that you don't have to be a 'natural' to tackle the analysis and theories of nature. Whatever your style of learning may be, together we will identify and use your existing academic strengths as a basis for how to approach every mathematical/theoretical nut you may need to crack from the classroom, thru your homework problems, all the way to the big tests.

Prior to receiving my B.S.E in Engineering Physics from the University of Michigan College of Engineering in 2005 I spent 3 years tutoring fellow college students in precalculus, calculus I & II, differential equations, as well as physics I & II. The tutee and I met one-on-one in an agreed upon location, such as the library or a dormitory study lounge. The student would not be asked to pay, for I was employed as a tutor thru a university department known as the Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP). The purpose of CSP is to provide academic support to any incoming or existing university students that have shown outstanding potential for success at the U of M even though he/she may lack some of the basic perquisites for college level courses.

Also, while working with CSP, I had the opportunity to work with incoming freshman in a summer math course. For three consecutive summers I was the student instructor for the precalculus class. As a compliment to the lecture given by the main instructor, students were required to attend my 90 discussion session three times a week. In a classroom setting I would review the latest material and individually address any questions or problems the students may have had. This precalculus course covered one of four core subjects which were part of CSP's Summer Bridge Program, a program intended for students from underprivileged/underrepresented backgrounds/high schools and to prepare them for the everyday college environment.

As a physics graduate student at San Diego State University I continued my tutoring experience again as a university employee. This time I tended the General Math Studies (GMS) 'Math Lab' where students could drop in for help with math at their own convenience. The lab restricts its services to students currently attending one of the three GMS courses: geometry, beginning algebra, or intermediate algebra. As a GMS tutor, it is our duty to assist any of the students in attendance of the lab. Within the four years spent there I also scheduled and conducted several review sessions held in an available lecture hall for any last-minute questions or explanations before a particular exam day.

During the summers I also worked as a teacher's assistant in a summer bridge program structured very similarly to the one at the University of Michigan as noted above. One main difference (besides focusing on algebra and geometry instead of precalc) included myself in attendance during the main lecture to aid students during in-class exercises and quizzes. These classes were a bit fast-paced in comparison to those during the main school year. In one summer we would hold classes for two entirely different groups of algebra pupils.

In my stretch of tutoring it has become very clear that there is no sole strategy for helping all students to absorb information or to understand a concept. As a tutor, I make a personal effort to become familiar with a student's 'learning personality' so that I may steer clear of lecturing (something already available in a conventional classroom). A lecture can be recorded and replayed perpetually; however, if your instructor is not speaking your language, unfortunately the recording of his voice cannot regress. Truthfully, I have witnessed actual humans, as professors and as tutors, who act very much like a tape-recording. They seem to march on, concerned not with whether they have left you far behind. Rather, I find it much more efficient to aide learning with conversation, marching side by side and never to lead too far ahead. I do my best to pause and retrace our route so that when you inevitably ask the same question multiple times, the solution is never explained twice in exactly the same way.

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Jordan’s subjects

Homeschool:
Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Calculus, Geometry, Physics, Precalculus
Science:
Math:
Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Calculus, Geometry, Precalculus, Trigonometry

Algebra 1

I have had at least 4 years of experience tutoring prealgebra, beginning, and intermediate algebra as a university employee while studying graduate physics at San Diego State University.

Our program consisted of a "Math Lab" where beginning college students taking these classes could come in and work on their homework with free resources, including on-duty math tutors. As one of these tutors it was my responsibility to assist students with questions and to periodically check in on students who were studying in the lab.

Algebra 1 (or Elementary Algebra) introduces the use of variables in equations and usually concludes with the basic concept of functions.

The subject generally covers these topics:
*Substitution (replacing expressions with values)
*Simplifying Algebraic Expressions (cancelling comon factors, etc.)
*Writing Expressions and Equations (translating a paragraph into math)
*Solving Linear Equations (finding intersection points)
*Multiplying Binomials (F.O.I.L.)
*Inequalities (greater than or less than)

Algebra 2

During my time as a graduate student at San Diego State University, I spent at least four years tutoring prealgebra, beginning, and intermediate algebra as a university employee.

Our program was based in a small room on campus, called the 'Math Lab' where young college students taking algebra classes were welcome to come in and work on their homework with free resources, including on-duty math tutors. As one of these tutors it was my responsibility to assist students with questions and to periodically check in on students using the lab.

Algebra 2 (or Intermediate Algebra) revolves mainly around the introduction, classification, and manipulation of functions of an indeterminate variable (i.e. equations symbolized by 'f(x)'). Successful completion of the course serves as an essential foundation for the future calculus student.

Algebra 2 generally covers these topics:
*Solving and Factoring Quadratic Equations (polynomials of degree 2)
*Solving Systems of Equations (finding the values of "x" and "y")
*Relationships between the Sides of an Equation (direct and inverse variations)
*Functions (mathematical relation between a dependent and independent variable)
*Matrices (used to solve systems of linear equations)
*Logarithms (inverse functions of exponential functions)

Calculus

For over three years the University of Michigan employed me as a peer tutor for calculus students. This tutoring experience may well be my most significant qualification as a calculus tutor.
When you major in physics, you must be fluent in calculus and differential equations because physics cannot survive without advanced mathematics.
However, neither the time I spent earning my bachelors in Engineering Physics at U of M nor my time studying graduate physics at San Diego State University would help me efficiently share the methods of calculus. It was personal interaction with fellow students that gave me an edge.
Years of tutoring calculus sharpened my sense for how people learn math and science. I discovered the ability to connect any type of inquiring mind with abstract concepts by using concrete examples.
Consider the operation d/dx( f(x) ). It is difficult to know what these symbols are implying unless you might see that d/dx( x^2) = 2x, d/dx( x^3) = 3x^2, d/dx( x^4) = 4x^3, d/dx( x^5) = 5x^4. Eventually you might catch that the power of x in the parentheses drops down and becomes a coefficient in each equation. This is just one pattern you are guaranteed to learn with plenty of repetition.

Physics

For over three years the University of Michigan employed me as a peer tutor for physics students. This tutoring experience may be my most significant qualification as a physics tutor.
Neither the time I spent earning my bachelors in Engineering Physics at U of M nor my time studying graduate physics at San Diego State University could prepare me for efficiently sharing the knowledge of physics. That is, my studies did not prepare me nearly as well as did actively and personally working with fellow students.
Years of tutoring physics sharpened my sense for how people learn science. I discovered the ability to connect all types of inquiring minds with abstract concepts by using concrete examples.
Consider the formula d=vt. It is difficult to process the practical use of these symbols unless you might multiply 60mph by 2hrs to get 120 miles. Seeing this, it takes just a hint to realize this product tells us that driving 60mph for 2 hours straight can get us 120 miles down the road.

Read all subject qualifications »

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Education

B.S.E. from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) (Engineering Physics)

San Diego State University (Graduate Coursework)

Great Tutor! Jordan has been fantastic at helping me understand calculus. Before working with him I felt like there was no chance I was going to be able to understand calculus. Jordan has been extremely patient with me and continues to teach me how to work through the problems not just explaining how to do them but the reasons behind why it works the way it does. He is a fantastic tutor and I recommend him to ...

— Carly from Chicago, IL on 1/16/12);

Hourly fee

Standard Hourly Fee: $55.00

Cancellation: 12 hours notice required

Groups may divide cost among the group's members. Cancellation fees will be equal to the cost of a session at the agreed upon rate.

Travel policy

Jordan will travel within 15 miles of Chicago, IL 60640.

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