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James N.

I love to tutor & have Master's degrees in Physics and Philosophy

Denver, CO (80228)

Travel radius
20 miles
Hourly fee
$40.00
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I love to tutor and have Master's in Physics and Philosophy. I am very good at figuring out what it is that's hanging a student up and coming up with an approach to the material that allows the student to understand and master it. My motto is "If the student fails to learn, then I have failed to teach!"

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James’s subjects

English:
Grammar, Literature, Proofreading, Reading, SAT Reading, SAT Writing, Vocabulary, Writing
Elementary Education:
Elementary (K-6th), Elementary Math, Elementary Science, Grammar, Phonics, Reading, Spelling, Study Skills, Vocabulary
Special Needs:
Phonics
Business:
Sports/Recreation:
Corporate Training:
C++, General Computer, Grammar, HTML, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, Proofreading, SQL, Web Design

ACT Math

The Math ACT consists of:
14 Arithmetic Questions
10 Elementary Algebra Questions
9 Intermediate Algebra Questions
9 Coordinate Geometry Questions
14 Plane Geometry Questions
4 Trigonometry Questions
for a total of 60 questions and you have 60 minutes in which to complete the test. That means you've got ~1min/question. They are several tricks to doing well on the exam that have nothing to do with the subject matter, and in addition to helping you with the subject matter, I can help master these tricks (which can be VERY hard to follow).

ACT Science

The ACT Science section has three sections consisting of 40 which you have 35 minutes to complete. The sections are:

Data Representation: understand, evaluate, and interpret information presented in graphs, tables, or charts - 15 questions

Research Summaries: understand, evaluate, and analyze one or more experiments - 18 questions

Conflicting Viewpoints: understand and evaluate conflicting viewpoints, theories, or hypotheses on a specific topic - 7 questions

As with all multiple-choice tests, there are some simple test-taking techniques that can improve your score, regardless of your mastery of the material. But it doesn't hurt to have a firm grasp on the material itself, and I can certainly help you with that -- I have an MS in Physics, AP-tested out of 2 semesters of chemistry, and minored in Math as an undergraduate.

Algebra 1

There's a lot of garbage taught in algebra 1 classes these days. But the simple fact of the matter is that algebra is NOTHING but arithmetic without the numbers. If you can add, subtract, multiply, and divide numbers, then there is very little in public school algebra that one doesn't already know.

It really is a shame that Algebra 1 is the topic that turns so many students off to math, when it ought to be a cakewalk.

Algebra 2

There's a lot of garbage taught in Algebra classes these days, and Algebra 2 continues with scaring students to death with story problems. Math teachers often start every lecture with about hard they are, and so, of course, the students 'learn' that story problems are hard.

But there is one simple, foolproof algorithm (step by step process) for working story problems, and, personally, I find story problems to fun. And I can teach you find them to be fun as well.

Astronomy

In high school, my father and I built a 10in Newton-style reflecting telescope from scratch. The tube was a 12in concrete post tube, and we melted, cast and polished and mirrored the main mirror -- completion of the main mirror took almost 3 months. The eye-piece lenses we bought, but we machined the two eye-piece cylinders from PVC tubes. With that telescope we were able to image Jupiter's Red-Spot and see moons transit it! By the time college rolled around, my my interest had shifted from astronomy to physics, but astronomy is still a topic near and dear to my heart.

ASVAB

The ASVAB is a multiple-choice exam (MCE), and as such, it is like every other MCE and there are certain techniques one can use to improve one's score on any such MCE.

I can help you master these techniques in addition to the all of the topics covered by the ASVAB: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto Information, Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects.

There are four ASVAB subtests:
Arithmetic Reasoning (AR)
Mathematics Knowledge (MK)
Paragraph Comprehension (PC)
Word Knowledge (WK)

Scores on there subtests are used to generate an Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score that is ranked into categories:
93-99 -> Category I
65-92 -> Category II
50-64 -> Category IIIA
31-49 -> Category IIIB
21-30 -> Category IVA
16-20 -> Category IVB
10-15 -> Category IVC
1-9 -> Category V

Scores category IIIA or higher may qualify for enlistment incentives, so a minimum AFQT score of 50 is what one generally wants to shoot for.

I have a MS in Experimental High Energy Physics from Kansas State Univ and an MA in Philosophy from Univ of Kansas. And up until just a few years ago I did all of my own auto maintenance, so I am more than capable of helping you with all of these topics.

Furthermore, I have taught enlisted personnel at Fort Riley (home of the Big Red One in Fort Riley, KS) math and philosophy so they could receive promotion, so I have a firm understanding of the kind of math and English skills the military looks for.

C++

I have been hacking code since high school. I gained most of my hands-on programming experience while working on my MS and PhD in Experimental High Energy Physics, where I programmed in a number of languages: FORTAN, C/C++, (Visual-)BASIC, and a number of web scripting languages (javascript, PHP, PERL) and specialized in physics programming environments like PAW, PYTHIA/JETSET, GEANT and GRAHMS.

In particular, I developed statistical thermodynamic models of particle flux for a Threshold Cherenkov Detector (TCD) for the Mid-Rapidity Spectrometer (MIDS) of the Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometers (BRAHMS) Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Simulated and documented CERN’s NA44’s TCD as a TCD for MIDS, Demonstrated that NA44’s TCD was inadequate for MIDS, and Participated in design of new a TCD for MIDS using C/C++.

Calculus

Calculus is where math gets serious. It's generally the most advanced topic offered in high school, and required for almost every science class you'll take in college.

Whether you're taking (AP) Calculus in high school or college, I can help you master this topic.

Chemistry

Let me be truthful, I haven't had chemistry since high school, when I took AP Chemistry. I got a 4 on the AP exam, and so got credit for 2 semesters of chemistry when I started school at CU Boulder.

But about 80% of chemistry, the stuff that isn't memorization (I couldn't tell you what the difference between a sulfate and sulfite is -- I thought that's why we made up those funny little one or two letter abbreviations like SO4^-2 and SO3^-2), is simple algebra, and I rock algebra.

Another 10% is knowing the periodic table (memorization), and the final 10% is understanding bonding (valence electrons and rules -- more memorization).

Chess

My father taught me chess when I was in elementary school, and we continued to play regularly through junior high. By that time we fairly equally matched, each of us winning roughly half the time. We would often walk our way through matches of champions in which one of the champions capitulated and then play until one of us one won (as often as not it was the player that won -- this was always hard to explain) and try to figure out what it was the capitulating champion saw coming that caused him/her to capitulate. I haven't played chess regularly in years, but I can generally beat Mac's Chess game when it's set to its easiest mode.

Computer Programming

In addition to teaching software engineers to "write better software faster" (DBS basics, MySQL, Oracle, MSSQL, MS Access, Linux OS, bash and makefile scripting, multi-threaded C/C++, debugging and testing multi-threaded software, multi-threaded software/cyber security) as an Educational Specialist II at Echostar (Dishnetwork's hardware spinoff), I have been hacking code since high school. I gained most of my hands-on programming experience while working on my MS and PhD in Experimental High Energy Physics, where I programmed in a number of languages: FORTAN, C/C++, (Visual-)BASIC, and a number of web scripting languages (javascript, PHP, PERL) and specialized in physics programming environments like PAW, GEANT, PYTHIA/JETSET, and GBRAHMS.

Computer Science

I have been hacking code since high school.

Not being too bright, I spent 3.5 years pursuing an Electrical Engineering/Computer Science degree at CU Boulder before realizing I didn't want to be a EE. Even so, a great deal of graduate work in Experimental High Energy Physics at KSU and KU involved work in computer science.

I gained most of my hands-on programming experience while working on my MS and PhD in Experimental High Energy Physics, where I programmed in a number of languages: FORTAN, C/C++, (Visual-)BASIC, and a number of web scripting languages (javascript, PHP, PERL) and specialized in physics programming environments like PAW, PYTHIA/JETSET, GEANT and GRAHMS.

Later, I taught software engineers to "write better software faster" (DBS basics, MySQL, Oracle, MSSQL, MS Access, Linux OS, bash and makefile scripting, multi-threaded C/C++, debugging and testing multi-threaded software, multi-threaded software/cyber security) as an Educational Specialist II at Echostar (Dishnetwork's hardware spinoff).

Differential Equations

I received an BS in Phyiscs from Metro State Univ of Denver in 1993 and an MS in Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) from KSU in 1996, and completed all of the coursework necessary for a PhD in Nuclear/Experimental High Energy Physics at KU.

On the way to these degrees I took math and physics courses which taught, _e.g._ differential equations (at the undergraduate level), mathematical methods of physics (at both the undergraduate and graduate levels) and made extensive use of differential equations(_e.g._ electric & magnetic fields (at both the undergraduate and graduate levels) and General Relativity (at the graduate level).

In my N/EHEP research at KU, I modeled the quark-gluon plasma created at BNL's RIHC collider which made extensive use of differential equations -- both in terms of flow/rotation and thermodynamics.

Dreamweaver

I have been a off and on web designer since 1994, having working both in industry (KSU, Sager Dental, Andax Industries, Kaiser Permanente and ISSISGlobal) and taking on numerous independent contract jobs (Barbara J Butler's Transitions Simplified International, Jody Rein/Patti Thorn's BlueInk Reviews) and volunteer website design work at Junell Norris's Manhattan Emergency Shelter.

Additionally in most of my teaching jobs (KSU, KU, Bethany College, MSUD, and CU Denver), I have developed websites for my courses.

The overwhelming amount of this work has been done using Dreamweaver, though I learned to code html long before using Dreamweaver, and so I am quite comfortable coding websites without Dreamweaver and think this would be a real bonus when teaching someone to use Dreamweaver.

Electrical Engineering

Not being too bright, I spent 3.5 years pursuing an Electrical Engineering/Computer Science degree at CU Boulder before realizing I didn't want to be a EE.

But having abandoned EE as topic of study, I did a great deal of EE work while a graduate student in Experimental High Energy Physics. A great deal of elementary EE topics are covered in the physics classes I taught at Baker University, KU and CU Denver. Furthermore, I taught two EE classes at Echotech Institute (EEN1440 - Wiring, Schematics, and Blueprints and ELE2000 - Digital Electronics)

As for hands-on experience, as a graduate student in Experimental High Energy Physics, I identified need and proposed device for better measurement and maintenance of bias-current of the Silicon MicroStrip Detector (SMSD) of the MIDS, participated (with Tim Sobering, Director, Kansas State University Electronic Design Lab) in design and manufacture of semi-conductor bias-current devices (BCD) for SMSD and installed the BCD's at BNL.

At Brookhaven National Lab, while participating in the Department of Energy's Science and Engineering Research Semester, I tested and analyzed performance of a prototype pixelated photomultiplier tube (PMT) for a proposed Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector.

At KU, I established and documented rejection criteria (relative and absolute gain, quantum efficiency and noise), developed and implemented testing procedures for ~600 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to be installed in Fermilab (E815) NuTeV’s calorimeter.
I then analyzed and documented frequency response of NuTeV calorimeter wave-shifting bars using Matlab and SimuLink

At Fermi National Accelerator Lab, I identified need for and oversaw (1 graduate and 2 undergraduate student) soft/hardware upgrade (with full documentation) of power supply control (PSC) for NuTeV bending magnets.

Elementary (K-6th)

I have been granted a K-12 Substitute Teachers license by both the states of KS and CO and taken many, many K-6 teaching assignments as a Substitute Teacher.

Fortran

I have been hacking code since high school. I gained most of my hands-on programming experience while working on my MS and PhD in Experimental High Energy Physics, where I programmed in a number of languages: FORTAN, C/C++, (Visual-)BASIC, and a number of web scripting languages (javascript, PHP, PERL) and specialized in physics programming environments like PAW and PYTHIA/JETSET.

In particular, I did a great deal of FORTAN programming while participating in the Department of Energy's Science and Engineering Research semester in both the Spring and Summer of 1993 while working on the Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometers (BRAHMS) Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL).

GED

The GED consists of five subject areas: math, social studies, science, reading and writing. One must earn no less than 410 points on each individual subject and must maintain an average score of 450 for all sections and is allowed 7 hours to take the test.

Like all other multiple-choice exams: there are techniques independent of content knowledge that will help one improve one's scores, and I can help with these in addition to mastering the content of all 5 subject areas.

General Computer

My first computer was a Commodore 64 -- if you don't know what that is, it's because you're too young.

I studied electrical and computer engineering at CU Boulder, and not being too bright, I was just a semester or so away from graduating when I realized I didn't want to be an engineer.

Instead, I got my BS in Physics and Philosophy from Metro State, and then MS in Experimental High Energy Physics from KSU. To help pay for grad school, I did telephone technical support for Windows machines, though I prefer Macs. I'm a guru in all MS Office applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access), and do freelance webdesign.

So computers have been a day in and day out part of my life for over 20 years.

Whatever you need in the way of help with General Computer knowledge/skills, I can help you.

Geometry

Geometery is often the first math class taught by means of memorizing theorems without reference to the real world, and this makes the topic unnecessarily abstract and hard to grasp. But everything Euclid wrote came as a result of looking at the world around him, and if geometry is taught from this perspective, it is really fairly straighforward.

HTML

I have never taken a class in web-design -- I am completely self-taught. 90% of the web pages on the web could be as static pages (meaning they would look the same every time they were loaded regardless of who was loading them) using no more than a dozen basic html tags.

CSS adds a great deal of customizability (_i.e._ allows these dozen tags to look different), but construction of basic web-pages using basic html can be mastered very, very quickly.

Linear Algebra

I received a BS in Physics from Metro State Univ of Denver (MSUD) in 1993 and an MS in Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) from KSU in 1996, and completed all of the coursework necessary for a PhD in Nuclear/Experimental High Energy Physics at KU.

On the way to these degrees I took math and physics courses which taught linear algebra, _e.g._ linear algebra and matrix theory (at the undergraduate level), mathematical methods of physics (at both the undergraduate and graduate levels) and made extensive use of linear algebra, _e.g._ quantum mechanics (at both the undergraduate and graduate levels).

At MSUD and In my EHEP research at KSU, I one of my focuses was the physics of neutrinos, specifically flavor-oscillations, which treat neutrinos as a superposition of all three flavors at the same time -- so the math is that of the linear algebra of 3x3 matrices.

Linux

In addition to teaching software engineers to "write better software faster" where there predominate OS was Linux OS as an Educational Specialist II at Echostar (Dishnetwork's hardware spinoff), the overwhelming programming I did in my Experimental High Energy Physics graduate program work was done in the LINUX OS. I am also predominately a Mac user, and since OS 10, the underlying Mac OS is LINUX.

Logic

In both my undergraduate and graduate studies in Philosophy I took both informal and formal/symbolic logic courses.

While an adjunct professor at Barton County Community College, I developed for online delivery and taught the 8 week BARTONline PHIL1605 - Introduction to Logic; this was predominately an class in informal logic though we did cover formal logic to some extent.

As an adjunct professor at Bethany College, MSUD and CU Denver, I taught courses in Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics, and in both cases I always greatly emphasized the informal logic arguments of the material covered in these classes.

Macintosh

I have been using Macs since the early 1990's, and intimately familiar with both OS <9 and OS 10.x.

While a graduate student in Experimenatal High Energy Physics student at KU, I managed a network of Macs and installed Yellow Dog LINUX on Macs running Mac OS 9.x before we replaced these older Macs with Macs running OS 10.x.

I also managed a network of Macs at Sager Dental when I was doing web design work there, where I performed wide variety of IT consulting tasks – researched and recommended technology to meet company needs, e.g. data backup, teleconferencing, personnel training regarding Mac OS 9.x and 10.x and Mac software. I purchased, installed, and integrated new Mac hard/software (computers and peripherals), performed Mac desktop support (hardware and software) when necessary. I also installed
Mac hard/software and arranged for several VOIP, IP video, conferences between Manhattan KS, WI, FL, Germeny and Switzerland;

Mechanical Engineering

I have a MS in Physics and have studied classical mechanics, which is the basis for mechanical engineering. I have also tutored Architechural Engineering students; and in my experience, mathematics and physics, which I know in spades, has been sufficient to help them.

Microsoft Excel

I am a MS Excel guru. Whether it's entering basic formulae, formatting the page and data in it to look nice when viewed/printed, I can teach everything you might ever want to know about Excel, including writing Visual Basic for Application (VBA) macros to make your Excel spreadsheets into powerhouses.

Microsoft PowerPoint

As an Educational Specialist II at Echostar, I developed a number of courses for the computer engineering staff to help them "write better code faster." Every one of these classes were developed to be delivered as MS PowerPoint presentations, and some of them were quite complicated making use of animation and fades of different kinds. I can certainly help you master MS PowerPoint.

Microsoft Windows

I have extensive experience using and administering Windows (98-Vista -- I don't have much experience with Windows 7 yet, but I'm a quick study) machines. Working for SmartSource as a Field Technician, I have performed soft/hardware (kiosk, workstation and POS computers, network printers and HD TVs) refreshes and installations for Best Buy, Rent-A-Center stores, Grainger Industrial Supply, and Sheraton Hotels -- these were all Windows machines. Working for QualxServ (now Worldwide TechServices) as a Field Service Technician, I performed on-site soft/hardware diagnosis, repair and support of Dell and IBM desktop and laptop computers running Windows (98-Vista), and earned the #1 Field Service Technician ranking out of 16 technicians in my Denver service area for 10 weeks, including 6 consecutive weeks.

Perl

As a web designer a number of my projects have required a database back end, and for a number of these projects I have used PERL as the interface language.

For instance, as a TA at University of Kansas, I had to take a TA-prep class that included a communication styles 'test'. It was a paper test with 36 questions that you had to answer with "1=never", "2=infrequently", "3=sometimes", "4=frequently" and "5=often". Then you had to 'grade' the test by hand, and this unbelievably tedious, as each question gave you a different number of points toward 9 different communication styles. I've got a MS Experimental High Energy physics, and in getting this degree, I accidentally took sufficiently many graduate level math courses to earn an MS in Mathematics, and I had to grade that %&@# test three times to get the right scores to indicate my gradation in these 9 communication styles.

So, I wrote a web-based version using PERL of the test for the class's instructor so she wouldn't have to waste so much class time on administering the test.

I also built a highly PERL driven user-interactive website for a dentist in Manhattan Kansas that used PERL as the interfaced to a MySQL database. This site is no longer except on my localhost, as part of its purpose was to attract investment capital which never appeared. But this site employed 2 tables with 42 columns and 23 columns, respectively, which shared a primary key to link registrants in the latter table to messages and requests for information about the product being peddled by the site stored in the latter.



PHP

As a web desinger a number of my projects have required a database back end, and for a number of these projects I have used PHP as the interface language, in particular, the webistes I designed for Kaiser Permanente and ISSIS Global have used PHP as the interface language.

Physical Science

'Physical Science' generally includes the following topics: physics, chemistry and 'Earth Science', which in turn includes the topics, the atmosphere, hydrosphere, oceans and biosphere, as well as the solid earth.

My MS in (Experimental High Energy) Physics, but I have a fairly thorough understading of chemistry.

'Physical Science' is generally a class taught in junior high school, and I am confident that I could help a student at these levels gain a firm grasp of all of these topics at these levels.

Physics

I have an MS in Experimental High Energy Physics from KSU and completed all of the coursework necessary for a PhD at KU. I have taught physics as an adjunct at a number of colleges and universities in both Kansas and Colorado and tutored many, many students physics -- I can supply references, if you wish.

My motto is: if the student fails to learn, then the teacher has failed to teach.

Prealgebra

There's a lot of garbage taught in pre-algebra classes these days. But the simple fact of the matter is that algebra is NOTHING but arithmetic without the numbers. If you can add, subtract, multiply, and divide numbers, there is very little in grade school algebra that one doesn't already know. But the topic is seldom presented this way so students are often intimidated/scared by it and wind up not doing well. When I teach algebra at any level, I ALWAYS relate the current topic back to a basic problem in arithmetic and then abstract to algebra so the student realizes that s/he's not really learning anything new.

Precalculus

In my experience pre-calc students have the most trouble with the subject because of a less than optimal background in trigonometry.

Trigonometry is at once one of the math classes I found to be both the least and most fun. The least fun because there's just a lot of memorization without which you simply cannot succeed. Fortunately, there are alot of mnemonics (_e.g._ SOHCAHTOA, sin respects sign, etc) that can make all this memorization almost painless. The most fun because a many trigonometry problems are like puzzles and you just have to figure out how to fit the pieces--the stuff you have to memorize--together to make the picture you want.

For me, the fun almost always outweighed the not-fun, and I'm sure I can help you find the fun in trigonometry.

Once this fun is found, pre-calc becomes much, much simpler. And dare I say it, fun as well.

Probability

My first probability class was in high school, and I got an A. My second probability class was at CU Boulder (UCB), I got an A, and the professor was BLIND! This should tell you something about probability -- except for very advanced topics, if you can count (the UCB professor taught the majority of the class by making hashmarks on the board), multiply and divide, you can do 90% of probability.

Reading

I have been granted a K-12 Substitute Teachers license by both the states of KS and CO and taken many, many K-6 teaching assignments as a Substitute Teacher where I was often subbing for a reading teacher or for which a major part of the day was spent on reading.

SAT Math

The SAT Math test consists of:

11–13 Numbers and operations questions,
19–21 Algebra and functions questions,
14–16 Geometry and measurement questions, and
6–7 Data analysis, statistics, and probability questions.

There are 44 standard multiple-choice questions and 10 'essay' questions for a total of 54 quesitons to be answeredd in two 25-minute sections and one 20-minute section for a total of 70 minutes. That means you have ~1:15min per question.

There are several tricks to doing well on the exam that have nothing to do with the subject matter, and in addition to helping you with the subject matter, I can help master these tricks (which can be VERY hard to follow).

SAT Reading

I completed all but my PhD dissertation in Philosophy and have taught philosophy at several colleges and universities -- and that meant learning how to read critically and teaching my students to do likewise.

I also write ficiton (short-story and novels), belong to the Rocky Mountain Ficiton Writers (RMFW), and attend 3hr long RMFW critique sessions twice a week in which my work is critiqued by others and I critique their work so I can certainly help you with your reading skills.

SAT Writing

I completed all but my PhD dissertation in Philosophy and have taught philosophy at several colleges and universities -- that's a hundreds of pages of my writing graded by professors and thousands of student pages of writing graded by me.

I also write ficiton (short-story and novels), belong to the Rocky Mountain Ficiton Writers (RMFW), and attend 3hr long RMFW critique sessions twice a week in which my work is critiqued by others and I critique their work so I can certainly help you with your writing.

SQL

While teaching software engineers to "write better code faster" at Echostar (DishNetwork's harware spinoff company), I developed and taught an introductory course to SQL databases (including Oracle, MySQL, and yes, even MSSQL -- even talked very briefly about MS Access).

Study Skills

Half of my tutoring and what I've done on my own has been teaching students study skills that they didn't learn or weren't taught. This includes underlining key passages of the text, making notes in the margin about material in the text that one doesn't understand so that one has a record of questions to ask the teacher/professor. Working problems for which one answers, whether they be examples in the text or problems for which their are answers in the back of the text. And so on.

Trigonometry

Trigonometry is at once one of the math classes I found to be both the least and the most fun. The least fun because there's just a lot of memorization without which you simply cannot succeed. Fortunately, there are a lot of mnemonics (SOHCAHTOA, sin respects sign, etc) that can make all this memorization almost painless. The most fun because a many trigonometry problems are like puzzles and you just have to figure out how to fit the pieces--the stuff you have to memorize--together to make the picture you want.

For me, the fun almost always outweighed the not-fun, and I'm sure I can help you find the fun in trigonometry.

UNIX

I have worked in a UNIX environment on Solaris workstations, while doing my Master's research in Experimental High Energy Physics. From a user's point of view, UNIX and Linux are interchangeable, and I taught software engineers to "write better software faster" where their predominate OS was Linux OS as an Educational Specialist II at Echostar (Dishnetwork's hardware spinoff). The overwhelming programming I did in my Experimental High Energy Physics graduate program work was done in the LINUX OS. I am also predominately a Mac user, and since OS 10, the underlying Mac OS is LINUX.

Visual Basic

I have extensive experience with VBA, having written MS Word, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint macros (routines) to generate monthly payroll reports, monthly expense reports, instructor, student class lecture notes, and multiple static html pages from a single MS Word or PowerPoint file, and (functions) to calculate student grades and GPA's , a variety of statistical analyses (financial and for research in physics), and ongoing/continuous budgeting.

The macro's were written for use at home, the Manhattan Emergency Shelter, First Command Financial Services, Echostar, and Kaiser Permanente, and every school I've taught at.

Web Design

I have been an off and on web designer since 1994, having working both in industry (KSU, Sager Dental, Andax Industries, Kaiser Permanente and ISSISGlobal) and taking on numerous independent contract jobs and volunteer website design work, for example, at the Manhattan (KS) Emergency Shelter.

For the last two years, I've paid the bills as a freelance web designer and you can see some of my work upon request.

Additionally in my almost of my teaching jobs (KSU, KU, Bethany College, MSUD, and CU Denver), I have developed websites for my courses.

I am an HTML, CSS, Javascript and PHP guru, and can help you with just about any aspect of web-design.

Writing

I have taught philosophy at all levels of higher education, and a 5-10 page was always a requirement for these classes.

I've been published in several peer-review journals in philosophy and physics (unpaid) and a gaming magazine (paid).

I also belong to Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, and many people in my critique group tell me I'm the best critiquer in the group. I've also had several several articles and short stories posted at the group's blog sites.

So whether it's fiction or non-fiction, I'm sure I can help you polish it if it's already written or write it if it isn't.

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Education

Metroplitan State University of Denve

Kansas State University (Master's)

University of Kansas (Master's)

Amazing tutor What can I say about James? What an amazing tutor this guy is! Not only is he a great tutor, but he's also a great friend with a huge heart and a great since of humor. James really pays attention to what you need to work at and he will help you target that specific area. Overall what an an amazing tutor James is, and I highly recommend him. ...

— Kathy from Aurora, CO on 7/15/14);

Hourly fee

Standard Hourly Fee: $40.00

Travel policy

James will travel within 20 miles of Denver, CO 80228.

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