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Clint G.

Credentialed Teacher/UC Berkeley Grad Specializing in English and Math

Hermosa Beach, CA (90254)

Travel radius
10 miles
Hourly fee
$40.00
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Background Check Status for Clint G.

Clint G. passed a background check on 6/26/14. The check was ordered by another user through First Advantage. For more information, please review the background check information page.

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I love teaching, and I am passionate about education. But this was not always the case. I can certainly understand anyone who is struggling in any subject. I am a lifelong learner myself.

I graduated on the honors list from UC Berkeley with a bachelor's degree in English in 2000. After working for several years in a variety of positions in the corporate world, I decided that I wanted to return to school to become a teacher. In order to gain experience in this field, I began working as an English and math tutor in late 2008. In 2010, I started graduate school at CSU Long Beach where I maintained a 4.0 GPA; and, in 2012, I received the SB 2042 multiple subject teaching credential with English authorization. While I explore educational opportunities, I have decided to continue tutoring.

If you or someone you love is having difficulty with any of the subjects listed, I would be delighted to help. For the past three years, I have primarily worked with students K-12 in English language arts, reading, and math with great success. Although I believe there are many subjects I could teach, I have only listed those that I have experience teaching and/or received solid 'A's in at the university level.

The majority of students I tutor do amazingly well.

I look forward to hearing from you.

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Clint’s subjects

Corporate Training:
Grammar, Proofreading
Test Preparation:
ACT Math, CBEST, GED, SAT Math, SAT Reading, SAT Writing
Homeschool:
Elementary Education:
History:
American History, Government & Politics, Social Studies, World History
Science:
Philosophy, Psychology
Math:
ACT Math, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Prealgebra, SAT Math
English:
English, Grammar, Literature, Proofreading, Reading, SAT Reading, SAT Writing, Vocabulary, Writing

Algebra 1

Algebra 1 is the study of elementary algebra. It is the next step, after pre-algebra, in the development of higher level mathematics skills. Algebra 1 emphasizes equation problem solving and graphing. The student's knowledge and confidence of equation work will expand as they learn topics such as: rational expressions, factoring, polynomials, radical expressions, and quadratics. The pace of the material covered will depend on the students' comfort level and understanding.

Algebra 2

Algebra 2 builds on concepts introduced in Algebra 1 and Geometry. It develops advanced algebra skills such as systems of equations, advanced polynomials, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratics, and includes the study of trigonometric functions. It also introduces matrices and their properties. Knowledge of Algebra 2 is important for success on both the ACT and college mathematics entrance exams.

American History

American history is one of the few subjects that American students are expected to study throughout most their educational careers. I have studied it more or less continuously, starting in elementary school and on through the completion of my general education requirements as an undergraduate. Last year I passed the multiple subject CSET exam which tests knowledge of American history from the early European explorations to the impact of 9/11.

Students of American history acquire basic knowledge and understanding of a multitude of topics including but not limited to colonial government and culture, the American Revolution, establishment of the Constitution, territorial expansion, slavery, the Civil War, the Reconstruction, industrial modernization, imperialism, progressivism, the two world wars, the Great Depression, the New Deal, the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, the Civil Rights Movement, and America's changing role in the world. Students of American history acquire a basic understanding of the discipline of history and historical knowledge as well as gain appreciation for the ways the study of the past is related to our current situation.

Art History

The goal of art history is the discerning appreciation and enjoyment of art. Originally I studied art history in college through a course that began with the Renaissance and covered the Baroque, the Rococo, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Futurism, Cubism, and Surrealism as well as other periods. Later, through my studies of literature I became further acquainted with these artistic movements, as well as earlier periods (Classical, Byzantine, Gothic) and more recent developments (Pop Art, Postmodernism, and Deconstructionism).

Currently, I work part-time at MAG Designs, a fine art company which specializes in painting on tile, stone, and canvas. Most of the inspiration for the creative projects there derive from the Italian Renaissance and the Baroque period in Flanders. Through my studies and this job, I have learned to appreciate and enjoy the history of art.

CBEST

On 6/12/10 I passed the CBEST with a cumulative status of "Highest Results."

I graduated with a degree in English from Berkeley with a 3.74 GPA. I was trained for four years to perform critical analysis and evaluation, as well as develop comprehension and research skills. This is what the Reading Section of the CBEST entails.

I also have strong writing skills and could teach others to write essays that would exceed the minimum standards for the CBEST. There are two types of essays on the CBEST, a rhetorical and a personal essay, and I have a great deal of experience with both.

Finally, I have worked as a math tutor for the past three years. I have the experience and skills necessary to show college students how to master the three types of math on the CBEST: estimation, measurement, and statistical principles; computation and problem solving; and numerical and graphic relationships.

Elementary (K-6th)

For the past three years, I have provided one-on-one tutoring to elementary school students who qualify for supplemental services under the No Child Left Behind law. I also regularly work on a volunteer basis as a pre-service teacher in a second grade classroom at Adams Elementary in Torrance.

I am currently enrolled in the multiple subject credential program at California State University, Long Beach. This credential will license me to teach students in elementary and middle school at a classroom level. I have already completed most of the requirements for the credential, including attaining a bachelor's degree; passing the CBEST, CSET, and RICA exams; fingerprint clearance; meeting the U.S. Constitution requirement; and all of the required education courses. All that I have left is student teaching, which I will complete this fall.

Elementary Math

Elementary mathematics is essential for all children and provides them with the opportunity to choose among the full range of future career paths. In elementary math children learn the basic concepts of arithmetic, problem solving, number theory, geometry, and the underlying principles of algebra. My goal as a math tutor is for students to:

• Develop fluency in basic computational skills.
• Develop an understanding of mathematical concepts.
• Learn to recognize and solve word problems readily.
• Communicate precisely about quantities, logical relationships, and unknown values through the use of signs, symbols, models, charts, and graphs.
• Make connections among mathematical ideas and between mathematics and other disciplines.

Elementary Mathematics, when taught well, is a subject of beauty and elegance, interesting in its logic and coherence. It trains children to become analytic — providing the foundation for intelligent and precise thinking.

English

As mentioned in my profile, I graduated from UC Berkeley with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English in 2000.

English as a subject is usually comprised of three parts: language, literature, and composition. Most English courses are designed to help students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of contexts and to become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.

English Literature is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative writing. Through closely reading texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students in the upper grades should consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing to evaluate a literary work involves making and explaining judgments about its artistry and exploring its underlying social and cultural values through analysis, interpretation, and argument.

My overarching objective as an English tutor is to enable students to communicate effectively and confidently in their classes and later in their professional and personal lives. Therefore, when tutoring students I emphasize the analytical writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication, as well as the personal and reflective writing that fosters the ability to write about any subject in any context.

GED

The GED consists of a series of tests designed to measure the knowledge and skills expected of a high school graduate. Most U.S. colleges and universities accept a GED credential in lieu of a high school diploma. Nearly all employers accept a GED credential as well. For example, I took the GED when I was 17 years old. Taking this test allowed me to leave high school and work full-time while I formulated my professional and educational goals. I went from taking the GED, to attending Santa Monica City College, to transfering to UCLA, and finally finishing my undergraduate work at UC Berkeley. In California, successful completion of the exam results in the California High School Equivalency Certificate.
The GED exams cover five content areas, requiring about seven hours to complete. The subject areas consist of the following:
1) Language Arts, Reading--This portion consists of various texts (fiction and non-fiction) followed by multiple-choice questions that test reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.

2) Language Arts, Writing--Part I of this section involves multiple-choice questions that cover: mechanics, organization, sentence structure, and usage. Part II requires a written essay on a general interest topic, which should include an introduction, body paragraphs, a conclusion, a strong thesis, and supporting arguments.

3) Science--Multiple-choice questions are 45% life science, 35% physical science, and 20% space and earth science. Most of the questions involve maps, graphs, charts or diagrams. Subjects covered in the section include photosynthesis, climate and weather, geology, energy, magnetism and cell division.

4) Social Sciences--This portion also involves reading short passages and answering multiple-choice questions. Passages will include documents like the Declaration of Independence, United States Supreme Court decisions, editorial cartoons and photographs. It is split up into content sections as well: 25% focuses on American history; 25% on civics and government; 20% on economics; 15% on world history; and 15% on geography.

5) Mathematics--This final portion of the GED is divided into five content sections: numbers and operations; measurement and data analysis; algebra; geometry; and standard grids and coordinate planes. The section that covers standard grids and coordinate planes is not multiple choice. Math topics include square roots, circumference, ratios and proportions, multiplying and dividing fractions and decimals, volume, angles, exponents, and the Pythagorean Theorem. Students will also need some basic knowledge of the English and metric measurement systems to answer many of the questions.

Prealgebra

In the typical sequence of mathematics courses, Prealgebra occurs after several years of basic math and precedes Algebra 1. The objective of Prealgebra is to explore mathematical concepts that are foundational for success in Algebra 1 including algebraic expressions, integers, equations, decimals, fractions, ratios, proportions, percents, area, volume, and probability.

When tutoring any mathematics subject my aim is to encourage and enable students to: appreciate the usefulness, power and beauty of mathematics, and recognize its
relationship with other disciplines and with everyday life; develop mathematical skills and apply them; and develop patience and persistence when solving problems.

Reading

Reading is one of the most important skills that children develop in school. There is practically no area of human experience where literacy is not important. It is not always easy to teach, however. Unlike math, it can be difficult to tell why exactly a student is struggling with decoding words. In my experience, overcoming reading difficulties requires extensive guided practice with texts at the student's reading level. My overarching goal as a reading tutor is to teach students to read with confidence, accuracy, fluency, and comprehension.

Study Skills

Study skills are an important part of achieving academic excellence. Effective study skills are generally associated with critical success in school, acquiring good grades, and are useful for learning throughout one's life. For students that are having difficulty in a subject, learning how to apply effective study skills can often make a crucial difference in their grade.

There is a vast array of study skills and a wide variety of schools of thought on the subject as well. I teach evidence-based strategies that help students improve their organizational skills, study effectively, succeed on assignments, and pass exams. I also take into account that each student is different and will benefit primarily from skills that complement his or her learning style.

Some students, for example, are visual learners. They benefit greatly from taking verbal information from their studies and using visual techniques to help encode and retain it in memory. For this learning style, using graphic organizers (such as webs or mental maps), flashcards, and diagrams are most beneficial. Other students have a more auditory or verbal learning style. They benefit primarily from methods based on acronyms and mnemonics. Since all students are unique, it is necessary to teach them how to learn new information and tackle assignments in a manner that best suits them.

Often, improvements to the effectiveness of study may be achieved through changes to things unrelated to the study material itself, such as time-management, avoiding procrastination, and maintaining a neat and well-ordered study space. In the upper grades of high school and at the college level, strong note-taking skills and time management strategies are especially important. Students at these levels are expected to learn enormous amounts of complex information in a short period of time. It is crucial, therefore, that their study sessions aim to ensure that activities which achieve the greatest benefit are given the greatest focus. It is helpful to develop a system which allows them to identify the importance of information and highlight or underline concepts according to their significance. Students in high school and college greatly benefit from learning to prioritize, starting with information which will provide the quickest benefit and ending with information that is the least vital.

Vocabulary

A “vocabulary” is simply the list of words a person knows in a given language. In other words, it is the primary tool we use to communicate meaning. For this reason, increasing knowledge of vocabulary is crucial in order to read, speak, and write fluently in English. The methods used to increase word knowledge vary depending on a student’s age, grade, or ELD (English Language Development) level. For beginners, basic words are taught with an emphasis on the context of different situations (i.e., we use different terms when talking with a doctor than we would when ordering breakfast). Dictionary skills are also important for the early grades and beginning ESL students as they will be able to learn common words, prefixes, suffixes, basic root forms, and idiomatic expressions. For intermediate level students, it is important to build on their recognition of basic words and word forms by teaching synonyms, antonyms, words with multiple meanings, and additional prefix, suffix, and root formations. For high intermediate and advanced students, the emphasis shifts to knowledge of academic language. Students at this level benefit from learning common Latin and Greek roots and developing denotation, connotation, and word context analysis skills, as well as increasing knowledge of advanced idioms and technical terminology.

Writing

My objective as a writing tutor is to enable students to communicate effectively and confidently in their classes and later in their professional and personal lives. For this reason, I emphasize analytical writing which forms the basis of academic and professional communication, as well as personal and reflective writing which fosters the ability to write about any subject in any context.

Read all subject qualifications »

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Education

University of California, Berkeley (English)

CSU Long Beach (Enrolled)

Excellent writing tutor! My 8-year-old son has very messy writing normally. We parents, several teachers and relatives have warned him to write more carefully, but he resisted. Clint and he met once a week over the summer to improve this messy writing. Each week my son practiced writing a few letters on wipe off cards and then wrote a draft of a journal entry. The following week he wrote the final draft into a journal and ...

— Jill from Rancho Palos Verdes, CA on 8/17/14);

Hourly fee

Standard Hourly Fee: $40.00

Cancellation: 24 hours notice required

Travel policy

Clint will travel within 10 miles of Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

Email Clint

Usually responds in about 7 hours

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